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Special registration issue 



The Summer 



vol. 1 No. 1 




MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 




Photo by Steve Ruggles. 
Taken on High Speed Infrared film with a 25A red filter with 50mm lens, Nikon F. l 125 of a second at f 8. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 




Preservation Hall Jazz Band in concert. 

El Grupo Folklorico Neoyorquino 

New-look folk music 



Within recent years, as in cen- 
turies past, Cuban Folkloric Music 
has accomplished an era of fame 
more immense than the depth of 
the seas. 

El Grupo Folklorico Neoyorquino 
will perform Cuban music at 7:30 
p.m. on July 10 on the Metawampe 
Lawn. Admission is free. In case of 
rain, it will be held in the Student 
Union Ballroom, and an ID must be 
required. 

Cuban Folkloric Music is fire, 
taste, and vanity; its syrup and relief 
make life more dynamic, as a rum 
absorbed through the ears leaving 
behind a remedy that equalizes and 
closely unites the Cuban peoples' 
sentiments. Cuban Folklpric Music 
known as Guaguauco has been 
defined as a diversity of more than 
one cultural contribution 
crystallizing the Cuban people. 

Let us say then that the for- 
mation of Cuban Music leaves 
behind two large cultural currents: 
firstly, the native of European in- 
fluences — white cultures, and 
secondly those they brought out of 
Africa — that of the Black cultural 
influences. With the concurrence of 
Black and White music, according 
to its grade of mestisoizsui in Cuba, 
there has originated a Euro-cubano 
music. European elements welded 
into the climate of the tropical 
native being: for instance, the 
romantic song for la guajira (native 
woman) and that of the African 
accentuating the Black element 
with the rumba and el son. 

Black music was imported to 
Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Haiti, 
and Cuba with the African slaves 







p. H.J. B. 'blasts-off' mid- July 



many years ago, and still survives 
through tradition. The music has 
persisted in the "Cabeldos", or 
societies, organized by the Afro- 
cubans thru generations, and is 
composed mostly of religious 
themes, since most of the 
"Cabeldos" have a religious basis 
devoted mostly to supplication and 
praise of the various dieties and-or 
supernatural beings. 

In an attempt to portray Cuba's 
artistic musical talents a group of 
NYC Puerto Rican musicians have 
compiled and created a variety of 
performances to bestow upon the 
community of U Mass a touch of 
traditional gaiety with rhythm and 
skill. The talents of El Grupo 
Folklorico Neoyorquino have been 
known to perform in previous 
events with well known musicians 
in the realm of NYC such as Dizzie 
Gillespie, Charlie Palmieri, Eddie 
Palmieri, Mongo Santa Maria, Jr., 
Ray Barreto, and the Orchestra 
Flamboyan. 

The group consists of: 
Nick Marrero — Drums, 

Tamboril 

Andy Gonzales — Bells, 

Gourds 

Jerry Gonzales — Conga 
Manny Oqeundo — Conga 
Tommy "Chaki" Lopez — 

Batu, Drums, Vocals 

Eladio Perez — Vocals 
Charlie Santiago - Drum, 

Tambor 

Harry Niggiano — Gourds, 

Casabelles 

Frankie Cruz — Vocals, 

Tambor, Maquey 



When the Preservation Hall Jazz 
Band arrives at Haigis Mall for their 
concert on Thursday Julv 18 at 7 
p.m., they will play New Orleans 
Jazz. The music is the root of all 
that we now know as jazz, plus the 
sound that changed the orchestras 
and the playing styles for all of our 
popular music, and has influenced 
many classical composers. Fine... 
but what is the music that will be 
heard here? 

It is easy to say what New 
Orleans Jazz isn't, but what it is to 
an audience is very subjective; what 
it is to a musician is equally per- 
sonal. The sources for New Orleans 
Jazz have been explored many 
times. 

There are labels. You can call it 
Blues, and be right, Ragtime and be 
right sometimes. You can hear the 
marches of funeral parades or of 
John Philip Sousa. You can hear 
the spirituals of Pineywoods 
churches in Louisiana or the songs 
of gospel quartets. The music of 
the Creole people in New Orleans 
with their quadrilles and even their 
minuets and their other special 
music is there. 

New Orleans Jazz is not slick and 
arranged on paper to be played the 
same each time. It is not Dixieland 
and it it is not the Vaudeville and 
night club brand of vaudeville 
music. It is not straw hats and 
funny jackets and cheap tricks. 

When you finally reach New 
Orleans music, it is five or more 
musicians who are playing a 
tradition, and still reaching into a 
deep well of creative genius to 
improvise. The trumpet plays the 
melody, the clarinet plays the 
counter melody, the trombone 
plays the harmony, the piano plays 
the chords on which it is all based, 
and the rhythm section keeps 
everyone inside the limits of the 
tempo... and then suddenly the 
melody moves to a different in- 
strument and that player improvises 
and changes everything and the 
excitement builds and your spirits 
soar along with the music and the 
happy sounds or the sad sounds 



and you know you are listening to 
New Orleans Music. 

On another level you are hearing 
the "jazz" of the bands that 
marched to and from the cemetery 
for funerals, of the wagons that 
drove up and down French Quarter 
streets and battled it out when two 
bands met at a corner. These were 
the people who heard Freddie 
Keppard or Buddy Bolden or King 
Oliver or Johnny Dodds or Kid Ory 
or Jelly Roll Morton or Baby Dodds 
play that melody and that change 
for the first time 55 years ago and 
you are hearing people who have 
played it for that long and have 
answered the demands of 
audiences at home in Louisiana 
Parishes for that many years, 
playing their music. 

So New Orleans Music doesn't 
submit to the confines of words. 
The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 
plays it the way it was played by 
the same historical people when 
they created jazz. The members of 
the Band are: Billie Pierce, co- 
leader and vocalist, who at age 15 
was Bessie Smith's accompanist; 
Percy Humphrey, co-leader and 
trumpeter, the only member of the 
Band listed in Who's Who; Willie 
Humphrey, on clarinet, who played 
with the Excelsior Brass Band, King 
Oliver, and Sweet Emma; 'Big Jim" 
Robinson, on trombone, who 
played with the Sam Morgan Jazz 
Band, Bunk Johnson, and George 
Lewis; Josiah "Cie" Frazier, on 
drums, who play for Bessie Smith; 
and Alan Jaffe, on tuba, the 
founder of the Preservation Hall in 
New Orleans. 

They play it with as much vigor 
and joy as they did then. Never 
mind that each member of the band 
is more than 60 years old now. They 
know what New Orleans Music is... 
and they'll be here to play it for you 
in concert. The music won't die; 
they are teaching other young 
musicians at Preservation Hall. But 
the music will never be just the 
same when these creators, who 
have stayed as young as their 
music, have left the stage for the 



lasi time. For they were there when 
it happened and their technique 
and their souls have never 
forgotten how to make it happen 
again, night after night, on the 
road, at a dance, or at Preservation 
Hall. 

Whatever New Orleans Jazz is, it 
will be on stage here. Those who 
remember previous UMass con- 
certs by the Preservation Hall band 
will want to bring their friends to 
this one. The audience will hear 
something that has never been 
heard before, and never will be 
heard again, just as the audience on 
any other night will hear a unique 
concert. Every one is different 
because the musicians, all now in 
their 60's, 70's or even 80's play 
improvised music. It is not an 
historical experience to hear the 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band — it is 
a happy, musical, enriching ex- 
perience that makes it more than a 
concert. 

Admission is free. There will be 
one intermission during the 2-2% 
hour concert. In case of rain there 
will be two shorter sessions at 7 and 
9 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom, and a UMass ID may be 
required. 



Gallery open 

The University of Massachusetts 
Art Gallery, located in Herter Hall 
Annex, will be open to the public 
Tuesday-Friday 1:00-4:00 p.m. 




Ij?Of^J??? Steak Hh Brew Presents 

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Connors 




Norm Connors 



"Dance of Magic", a concert 
with Norman Connors, will take 
place Aug. 7 at 7:30 p.m. on the 
Metawampe Lawn. In case of rain it 
will be held in the Student Union 
Ballroom and an ID may be 
required. Admission is free. A 
workshop may also be scheduled. 

With growing success, that 
beautiful, progressive and ex- 
perimental music that has been 
known as jazz, is again making itself 
felt as an irresistible force 
throughout contemporary music. In 
the flute playing of Herbie Mann, in 
the genius composing and electric 
piano of Herbie Hancock, a new 
spirit is coming into its own, born of 
the giants of the jazz past and 
fusing with the new sophistication 
of rock audiences. Mann, Hancock, 
Phoroah Sanders, Sun Ra, Rashaan 
Roland Kirk are now familiar names 
to young listeners. And to this 
charmed circle it is time to add the 
name of a brilliant young drummer, 
Norman Connors. 

A composer, performer, band 
leader and a charismatic force in his 
own right, Connors has captured 
the imagination and allegiance of 
the finest of his musical con- 



temporaries. As on his previous 
albums, Connors' debut album on 
the Buddah label. Love From The 
Sun has been recorded with the 
assistance of musicians like Herbie 
Hancock, Hubert Laws, Billy Paul, 
Gary Bartz, Carlos Gannett, Dee 
Dee Bridgewater and Eddie 
Henderson. There is no simple way 
to describe Connor's music. It is like 
walking into a garden of vivid 
musical colors. Melody, energy, 
nervousness, sensuality, per- 
cussion, space... these are some of 
its mesmerizing qualities. 

Connors' accomplishments are 
the fruit of an entire young lifetime 
of music. Born "some twenty odd 
years ago" in Philadelphia, Connors 
has been playing drums and writing 
music since the age of five, and has 
performed, written and recorded 
with some of the biggest names in 
contemporary music. Among these 
is the Pharjah Sanders Quintet, 
about whom Connors says, 
"Workinj with Pharoah has been 
one of my most rewarding 
associations so far. Pharoah's 
concepts have given me the op- 
portunity to develop as an in- 
fluential stylist in the art of per- 



cussion." A good listen to the 
sinewy precision and the driving 
flexibility of Connors' playing amply 
shows his accomplishments as a 
master of percussive style. 

His musical studies are 
prodigious; with Gilbert Stanton at 
the Henry Glass School of Music in 
Philadelphia, with Ellis Tollin and 
Paul Patterson at Music City, 
composition at the Settlement 
House School of Music also in 
Philadelphia. Connors attended 
Temple University for two years, 
and then the Julliard School of 
Music in New York, majoring in 
percussion and composition. 

Following school, Connors 
became involved in an intense 
career of musical activity; in 1968 
with the Marion Brown Quartet, in 
1968-68 with Archie Shepp he 
recorded The Magic of Ju Ju on the 
Impulse label. In 1969 he worked 
with Sun Ra, and 1970 saw him 
collaborating with Carlos Garnett 
and Jackie McLean and with Dam 
Rivers at the Jazz Workshop in 
Boston. In July 1971 he joined 
Pharoah Sanders, traveled around 
the world with him and recorded 
two albums: Black Unity and Live 
At the East. 



Music hours 

As a form of relief from the 
summer's heat and early morning 
work, music will be provided for the 
entire communities enjoyment. 
Utilizing the Campus Center 
Concourse as a promenade, dif- 
ferent musical styles will be 
presented as a means of relaxation 
and listening pleasure. The Tanner 
Family will employ piano, per- 
cussions and miscellaneous in- 
struments. Two different styles of 
guitar will be presented by Bob 
Phelps and Brian Newark. 

Dr. Fred Tillis, a prolific composer 
and arranger for the UMass Jazz 
Orchestra will play some of his 
original works on the saxophone. 
Dr. Dan Jordan, of the Center for 
Human Potential, also a classical 
pianist will give us a rendition of his 
music and his philosophy on life. 
Employing a wide variety of brass 
instruments the trumpet virtuoso, 
Walter Chestnut will also perform. 
, To round the program out a 
superb dancer from East India 
named Sumathy Khaushal will 
perform her dance rituals. So if you 
have nothing better to do at lunch 
hour on Wednesdays, please join in 
for a memorable summer of Music 
Hours. 



Bicentennial prelude 



Arts Comm. sets Valley talks 



As a prelude to the Bicentennial of these United 
States, the Summer Arts Committee of Student 
Activities will present five informal discussion 
sessions dealing primarily with some of the historical 
aspects in the Pioneer Valley. This will be an excellent 
opportunity for students, staff and faculty to become 
aware of the wealth of information that exists right in 
their own geographical area. The series will also add 
some relections for tne upcoming events that are 
going to be celebrated on a national scale. One of the 
speakers will be Ms. Polly Longsworth who will 
concentrate on the Life and Times of Poetess Emily 
Dickinson. Ms. Longsworth has done a very thorough 
job researching the life of Emily Dickinson. The 
gravesite and family estate of the Dickinsons are still 
very much intact in Amherst. 

Historic Deerfield is not only one of the most scenic 
areas in the Pioneer Valley but also significant for a 
host of historical and political beginnings. In the early 
formation of the New England society, Deerfield was 
to play an important role. Much of the infornnation 
that relates to the early settlement of this area can be 
found in the Old Deerfield Library. Peter Spang of Old 
Historic Deerfield Inc., who is very knowleable on this 
subject, will be the second speaker in the series. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College was one of the 
focal points for both social and educatiomi 
development. Goodell Library until quite recently was 
the repository of the University's history and quite 
often valuable manuscripts and artifacts were 



donated to the University's archives. Ms. Katharine 
Emerson, Librarian and Archivist at the new Library 
will discuss some of the important papers that are in 
possession of the University and that are available for 
research. Ms. Emerson will also trace the different 
phases of the University's development. 

Lord Jeffrey Amherst after which the town was 
named figures very prominently in Indian affairs as it 
related to the settlers contacts with the original 
inhabitants. One of the most well known situations 
concerning Lord Amherst and the Indians was his gift 
of smallpox vaccinated blankets to them. Dr. 
Frederick Turner, renowned folklorist, will talk about 
the influence and presence of Indians in this area. 

Boston was an abolitionist stronghold and anti- 
slavery sentiment ran throughout New England in 
both church and school politics. Amherst was a part 
of that elaborate system called the underground 
railroad and escaped slaves on their way to Canada 
used homes in Amherst as rest stations. Dr. Sidney 
Kaplan, Distinguished professor of English, has 
devoted many years of dilligent investigation of the 
subject of the American experience. Professor Kaplan 
will bring to the discussion many unknown facts 
about the events that shaped the character of these 
unsuspecting Massachusetts towns. 

All of the informal sessions will take place on 
Wednesdays at 3:00 p.m. in the Colonial Lounge of 
the Student Union from June 27 to August 8, 1974. 



Bo Diddley gig 

On July 30th, a blues concert 
featuring Bo Diddley and Mighty 
Joe Young will be presented. Bo 
Diddley established his reputation 
as one of the leading blues artists in 
the 50's, along with such greats as 
Chuck Berry and Little Richard. The 
famous "Bo Diddley beat" has 
been copied by many, but none 
have been able to totally capture 
that unique, pounding rhythmn that 
is truly Diddley' s own. As a 
guitarist, he can only be described 
as outstanding. His music remains 
as contemporary as today, and 
should delight blues, soul, and rock 
fans alike. 

Mighty Joe Young, a five- 
member group whose sound has 
been described as "funky soul," is 
presently performing in Argentina 
and Brazil. In addition to numerous 
club dates, the group has planned a 
tour of various campuses across 
the country. Mighty Joe himself is 
an accomplished musician and has 
played with Tyronne Davis, Magic 
Sam, and CoCo Taylor. 
The concert will be held on 
Metawampe Lawn, behind the 
Student Union, at 7 p.m. In case of 
rain, the concert will move to the 
Student Union Ballroom, and 
student I.D. may be required. 



Summer 

Entertainment 

Wednesday Friday ft 
Saturday 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 
SpiM 

SUNDAY. MONDAY & 
TUESDAY <^o» 

Includes Salad Bar *||1»' 

STCAr 
€IJT« # ■ 

Corner University Drive and 
Route 9 




McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte.9) 
Hadley, 584-2277 



CYCLE REPAIRS 



Ail Makes ft Models 
Parts ft Accessories 



For people 
who walk 
the earth . . . 

Shoes, Sandals, Sabots 
and Boots for Men & Women 
from $23.50 - $42.50 
Brochure Available 




earth 




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264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413) 256-8911 

14 Story St. 
Brattle Arcade 
Cambridge, Mass 02138 
(617) 492-6000 



Closest Bike 
Sliop to 
U. Mass 





Our Soft Clog 

U.S. Patent No. 330iV4/ 



Amherst Hours: 

10 5:30, Men. -Sat., 11-7 p.m., Fri. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



Summer art summary 



Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


June 


24 

Sunnnner 
School 
Begins 


25 

Film: 

"The Good, the Bad, 

and the Ugly" 


26 

Music Hour: 

Walter 

Chestnut 


27 

Bicentennial 

Discussion Hour: 

Katharine 

Emerson 


28 


29 


JULY 


1 

Rim: 
"The Graduate" 


2 

Music Hour: 
Tanner 
Family 


3 

Holiday 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 

Film: 
"Easy Rider" 


10 

Music Hour: 
New Ark 

Cuban Folkloric 
Music 


11 

Bicentennial 

Discussion Hour: 

Peter Spang 


12 


13 


15 


16 

Film: 
"The Lion Has 
Seven Heads" 


17 

Music Hour: 
Bob Phelps 


18 

Bicentennial 

Discussion Hour: 

Fred Turner 

Preservation Hall 
Jazz Band 


19 

Indian Movie 
Thop^pson 104 


20 


22 


23 

Film: 
"Dodes Ka-Den" 


24 

Music Hour: 
Fred Gillis 

Lecture: 
David Toma 


25 

Bicentennial 
Discussion Hour: 
Polly Longsworth 


26 


27 


29 


30 


31 

Music Hour; 
Dan Jordan 


1 Bicentennial 
Discussion Hour: 
Sidney Kaplan 

**HA 


2 

IR" 


3 










August 


5 


6 

Film 
"Klute" 


7 

Music Hour: 
Sumathy Khaushal 

Norman Connors: 
"Dance of Magic" 


8 

New England 
Dinosaur Co. 


9 

toad To The Deep I 


10 






12 


13 


14 


15 


16 

Summer 

School 

Ends 


17 



NOTES: 

1 . Films - Tuesdays at 8 p.m. (CC Aud.) 

2. Bicentennial Discussion Hours — Thursdays at 3 p.m. (Colonial 
Lounge) 

3. Music Horns - Wednesdays at 12 noon — 1 p.m. (CC Concourse) 

4. Concerts — Metawampee Lawn (Exception: Preservation Hall Jazz 
Band at Haigis Mall; if rain, in SUB. 



Northampton V.W. 
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1967 CHEV. IM- 
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1966 DODGE Polara 

^295 

1965 FORD Galaxy 

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1964 LINCOLN 
Continental *395 

Northampton 
V.W. @ 

246 King Street, 
Northampton 
584 8620 
Open till 9 every nite 
Saturdays till 5 




WBM 
HAROIPS 



• NEW and USED Clottiing featuring the lowest prices 

in town 

• Used jeans, denim jackets, leather jackets, western 

shirts, much more . . . 

•New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 

PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 

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Friday Nite, fill 9 




^tH€ OIPTNM'9 i^Am 



offerinfT a 
summer of 

GOOD TIMES 

• Complete Dinner Menu 

WEDNESDAY SI >.DAY, Featuring 

Broiled Live Lobster '3''! 

• Happy Hour Daily 4-6 p.m. 
all drinks only 49' 

• Entertainment Sunday & 
Monday Nites 

• Luncheons Daily 11:30-3:00 



4S DAMON ROAD. NOKTIIAIVIPTON 

.>84-fiOH« 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Jocks plan active I.M. season 



AM. schedule 



Activity 



Entry piay Minimum 
Dua Begins Players 



Tlme- 
Days 



Facility 
Location 



Type Of 
Touiney 



Schedules 



Softball 

Men's 

Women's 

CoRec 



7/2 7/8 12 

7/2 7/8 12 

7/3 7/9 14 



4-7 p.m. 
M& W 
M& W 
T& TH 



Fields west 
of Boyden 
Building 



League Klay: 
RR B P. 
Playoffs: 
Single 
elimination 



Seasonal 

Participants 

pick up at 

IM Office on 7/5 



Volleyball 

Men's 

Women's 

Co-Rec 



7/2 7/9 
7/2 7/9 
7/3 7/8 



4-7 p.m. 

T&TH 
T6TH 
M& W 



Fields west 
of Boyden 
Building 



League Play: 
RR it P. 
Playoffs: 
Single 
Elimination 



Partic'pants 
pick up at 
IM Office on 
7/5 



Badminton 
Men's 
Women's 
Mixed Doubles 



7/5 
7/6 

7/5 



7/10 
7/10 
7/10 



Open 
Open 
Open 



4-9 p.m. 

M-F 
M-F 
M-F 



Main Gym 
in Boyden 
Building 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office on 
7/9 7/10. 



Handball Singles 
Men's £t Women's 



7/5 



7/11 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Horseshoes 

Men's Singles 
Women's Singles 
Mixed Doubles 



7/5 7/11 
7/5 7/11 
7/5 7/11 



Open 
Open 
Open 



3-8 p.m. 

M-F 
M-F 

M-F 



Pits west of 
Southwest 
Residence 
Halls 



To be 

announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Paddleball Singles 7/5 7/11 

Men's And Women's 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Squash Singles 
Men's & Women's 



7/5 



7/11 



Open 



Anytime 



Lower level 
in Boyden 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office 



Tennis 

Men's 
Women's 
Mixed Doubles 



Anytime 



7/5 
7/5 
7/5 



7/11 
7/11 
7/11 



Open 
Open 
Open 



N.O.P.E. 
courts, 
Boyden 
courts 



To be 
announced 



Participants 
pick up in 
IM Office on 
7/9 7/10. 



Swim Meet 

Men's 
Women's 



6 p.m. 



7/19 
7/19 



7/23 

7/23 



Open 
Open 



Meet: 
Boyden Pool Sprints, 
Relays, 
Diving 



Cross Country 

Men's 
Women's 



7/16 
7/16 



7/16 
7/16 



Open 
Open 



7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 



Stadium 
Road 



Rac* 

1.7 Mi. 
1.0 Mi. 



Bike Race 

Men's 
Women's 



7/30 
7/30 



7/30 
7/30 



Open 
Open 



7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 



Stadium 
Road 



Race 



1.7 
1.0 



Mi. 
Mi. 



^^0^0^0t0t0^0^0^0*^^0*0^^^0^^^^^0 ^ 



Classifieds 



BU vn.Ks 

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Sairs of all mmtrrii biryrlrs. IVInton. I 
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II Allt .STYLING 



(onvrnlrncr. style and cnol pipasurr all 
suniiiirr lonK. l-el us shapr and maintain 
\our hair lhr»uRh thr long, hot summer 
with conditioners and moisturizers hy KK 
.ind .\MI\»> IM(\ Your Style (enter. 2.VJ- 
<tKNI. ( ollegeloMn Inisex. IK:t No. Pleasant 
St.. .\mherst. Mass. 

(f 



IIK.I.I' \V.\NTKI> 


)>fficials neede 
Intramural office. 


d part 

Km. 2 


time. Contact 
.'> Hoyden. 



Infirmary 

(In An 
Emergency) 

(54)9-2671 




The intramural Activities 
Department is happy to announce 
that they will conduct a Summer 
Intramural Sports Program 
commencing on June 24th. 
Organized sports will include 
Softball, volleyball, tennis, bad- 
minton, horseshoes, a swim meet, 
bike race and cross country race. In 
addition, squash, hand ball and 
paddleball tournaments will be 
conducted for both men and 
women. The Boyden Physical 
Education Building will be available 
at specified posted hours for 
general recreational activity. 

The Intramural Department will 
administer a three part program 
consisting of Competitive Sports, 
Co-ed Recreational Sports Ac- 
tivities, and Open Play. 

The Competitive Sports Activity 
Program will include a variety of 
team and individual sports for both 
men and women. In addition. Co-ed 
competition will also be available. 



For those students who prefer 
informal, leisurely workouts on their 
own, or a relaxing dip in the pool, 
the Open Play Program will avail all 
recreational sports facilities for use 
when not otherwise scheduled. 
Last year about 2,(XX) students, 
faculty and staff who actively 
participated found the program to, 
be a rewarding experience 
physically, mentally and socially. 
Information concerning specific 
activities will be distributed at 
Registration and is available at 
residence halls, as well as the In- 
tramural Office, 2'\3 Boyden 
Building. Al Morris and Steve 
Hardy will conduct the summer 
program with the assistance of the 
regular intramural staff. The In- 
tramural Office (5-2693, or 5-2801) 
may be contacted anytime between 
the hours of 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and 
the staff will gladly answer any 
questions pertaining to the 
Summer Program. 



Help us help you. 
Use Zip Code. 

Yo\xr Postal Service 




.^^\ia(«i|il*il<)ii|i<ii<iiilli>iii'iil<M<ii»ii|«>(ii>tMllll»l|iilM*l(MiiiM>liMfi^|^4^jy^|0^__ 

^COLLEGETOWN ~ ' 



a 



^BARBER SHOP 

IS3 No. Pleasant St., Amherst 253-9884 

ummaiie in Hair Care 




Ems 



SCIENTIFIC 
HAIRICARE 
CENTER " 



8:00-5:30 
Monday thru Sat. 



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Top of fhe Cd^mpos 




dinner 

tues.-sat. - 5:30-9:30 p.m 

feafuririg 

PRIME RIB SPECIAL 

entertainnnent 
thur., fri., sat. 
9:00 p.m. - 12:45 a.m. 

reservations 

call 549-6000 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 




MONDAY, JUNE 24, I974 



Dave Toma to speak 



Dave Toma. The cop of a 
thousand faces. The cop who 
hasn't fired his gun in 17 years, but 
has made 9,000 arrests with a 98 
per cent conviction rate. The cop 
who makes the Syndicate nervous. 
The cop who has saved many lives 
and who has wept for the lives he 
couldn't save. He believes in 
compassion and understanding. 

Toma will lecture on the "New 
Cop" at UMass on July 24, at 8 
p.m., in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. His opinions are 
strong, and they. are his own. He 
has firm ideas about drugs and 
addiction, about prostitution, about 



street crime and organized crime, 
about violence, and about the role 
of the policeman. His specialty as a 
detective is disguise-he has used 
the roles of derelict, clergyman, 
beggar, doctor, small-time street 
hustler, prostitute (female), and 
health inspector, to get close to his 
quarry and gain their confidence. 
The mobsters in Neward, his city, 
have even circulated posters with 
his picture on them, and a warning. 
He has published a book about his 
activities, and a TV series has been 
done about him, in which he plays 
small parts. He's been injured and 
hospitalized more than thirty times 



A nice cop 



Bluewall 



The Bluewall cafeteria serves 
luncheon meals from 11:30 a.m. to 
2 p.m., Monday through Friday 
(closed Saturday and Sunday). The 
bar is open Monday through Friday, 
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 a.m., and on 
weekends, from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. 
Entertainment will be offered four 
nights each week (Wed., Thurs., 
Fri., and Sat.) from 9 p.m. until 
closing. 

The first night of entertainment 
will be June 26th. Monthly en- 
tertainment calenders will be 
available at the C.C. Information 
Desk and the C.C. Food Services 
Office. 



SUMMER IN 
AMHERST? 




529 Belchertown Rd.. 



Amherst 



HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 
4 p.m. -6 p.m. 
25c Beer — 50c Mixed Drinks 
Entertainment Wed. -Sat. 
DINNERS SERVED 
Mon. -Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 



5:30p.m-10:00p.m. 
5:30 p.m.-ir.OO p.m. 
5:00 p.m.-tl :00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 



I 






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MON DAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



o^ SUMMER SOUNDS 

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15 E. Pleasant St. 
AMHERST 

S f I T T T H F P U H 

549-1105 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 




Sctn* from "TIm Lion Has Sovon Hoods' 



THE SUMMER 




EDITORS 



Rudy Jones 



Michael D. Kneeland" 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 



ISSUE PRODUCTION 



Steve Ruggles 



COORDINATORS 



John Woods 

Augustine J. Blount 

Sisay Bezu 



Bill Hassan 
Jim Riley 



^ ^ OPEN Srao^ gjoo ~~)j 




f 



SCARVfS 
COATS 



'(^p^rwfHr^a^roffiti --MMmR^ 



Summer film schedule 



June 25 "The Good, the Bad, and 
the Ugly" 8 p.m. CC Auditorium 
(1967) Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, 
Lee Van Cleef d. Sergio Leone 
§ The story involves hostility and 
uneasy alliances, $200,000 hidden 
in a cemetery, and the Civil War. 
With this film, Leone created the 
essence of the "spaghetti western" 
and established a new genre. This is 
a modern western, where the 
values are confused, the en- 
vironment desolate. Godless, and 
beautiful. 

July 2 "The Graduate" 8 p.m. CC 
Auditorium (1967) Dustin Hoffman, 
Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross d. 
Mike Nichols 

S in graduating, Benjamin is forced 
to confront the real world: parents, 
coclctail parties, wealth, and 
boredom. He copes by having an 
affair with Mrs. Robinson, a friend 
of his parents. Besides bringing 
Dustin Hoffman and Mike Nichols 
to the world's attention, this film 
made the concept of "anti-hero" a 
popular one, and helped bring 
attention to the director as artist. 

July 9 "Easy Rider" 8 p.m. CC 
Auditorium (1969) Peter Fonda, 
Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson d. 
Dennis Hopper 

§ In this "search for America" we 
see hippies, a commune, rednecks, 
surrealistic drug sequences, and 
motorcycles, with a rock music 
score. At the time it was made, 
these representated a national 
fantasy totally realized. The film 
rocked the motion picture industry, 
and began a new genre: the hippie 
on the road. 



July 16 "The Lien 
Heads" 8 p.m. CC 
(1970) Jean-Pierre 
Glauber Rocha 



Has Seven 
Auditorium 
Leaud d. 



July 23 "Dodes Ka-den" 8 p.m. 
Auditorium d. Akira Kurosawa 



CC 



Aug. 6 "Klute" 8 p.m. CC 
Auditorium (1971) Jane Fonda, 
Donald Sutherland, d. Alan J. 
Pakula 

§ Here is a vivid look at high-priced 
prostitution, the depraved fringes 
of the New York undenrt/orld, and a 
tortured romance between the two 
stars,. 



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Nothing. No chicken liver salads. No spaghetti. No ice creonr^. 

No potato salad. No kidding. We deal in pizzas only. 

The finest pizza we can make. And we osoally 

deliver it within 30 minutes of your call. And our pizza is made 

of fresh ingredients only. They are never frozen. 

Never. So give us a try the next time you crave really good 

pizza. See why Domino has grown from a single shop in 

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Offer Expires July 1st 
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Student Union Art Gallery presenting shows 



The Student Union Art Gallery 
will open with an exhibition of 
paintings by Emily Marshall, which 
will run until July 6. The artist 
describes her work as "a variety of 
oils on canvas, all sizes, some 
monochromatic, some full of 
vibrant and rich colors, all new in 
their textural composition, some 
actually resulting in bas- 
relief... concerned with shapes and 
indications of movement which 
most exactly reflect the grace of 
nature, and utilizing a technique of 
deep and rhythmic ridges and 
indentations dome by a chemical 
invention of my own, I strive for 
expression of the emotional as 
well as expressing natural 
phenomena..." 

Her work has been exhibited 
during 1973 at the Peterson Gallery, 
Nantucket, Falmouth Artists Guild, 
Provincetown Art Association, The 
Ballroom in Soho, New York and 
the Wheeler Gallery in Concord. In 
addition to many private collections 
in New York and New England, her 
paintings have been purchased for 
collections in England, South 
Wales, and Africa. Fans of Ms. 
Marshall look foward to another 
major showing in New York 
planned for the fall. 

Our second showing this summer 
will be Joe Sam's Nudes. This 



exhibit, running from July 8-July 19 
consists of ink drawings and prints, 
most of which have never been 
shown before. 

Last year Joe Samuel left his job 
A'ith the University of Mass School 
of Education to pursue his artistic 
carreer full time. He identifies 
strongly with other minority artists 
and is particularly pleased with his 
"home exhibitions" which he feels 
show that good art can be created 
with minimal facilities. 

In addition to his "home shows", 
Joe can be pleased with his major 
New York presentations. 

The third exhibition will be of 
paintings by Scott Prior, a 1971 
graduate of UMass, will be held in 
the Student Union Art Gallery 
(second level Student Union) at 
UMass. July 23 to August 4. Prior's 
work consists primarily of interior 
scenes, though his award-winning 
"Nimrod's Engineers" includes 
details of hardhat engineers, 
buildings, and landscape. The spirit 
of his work has been described as 
"a unique synthesis of contempory 
New England and the late Gothic- 
early Renaissance period in the 
Netherlands." 

Prior's work was first exhibited in 
the fall of 1971, with the Cape Cod 
Art Association at Gallery on the 
Green in Canton, Conn., and 
Bridgton Art Show, Bridgton, 
Maine. Other exhibits include the 
Texas Fine Arts Association 61st 



Give 

tm 

helps 



+ 



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IMCtom. f 

ThcCood ] 

Nevhboc 



f 



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than the name 
on the frame. 




See your specialists with: 

• Rentals 
M Hour Repair Service 
Sales, New & Used 
Touring & Racing Accessories 
Personal Attention to all Cycling 
needs 




• /I 

1 E. Pleasant St. 
Amherst 
349-6904 



Annual Exhibition (1972), Two Man 
Show at Optik Gallery, Amherst 
(1973), and New Talent Show. 
Dintenfass Gallery, New York 
(1974). 
The final showing in the art 



gallery this summer will be of our 
own aquisitions collection, running 
from Aug. 4 through the close of 
summer school. Unlike other shows 
this summer it will feature a wide 
variety of artists, some very well 



known, and an interesting 
assortment of topics and 
techniques. We think this should be 
a particularly exciting exhibit as 
there shoukJ be works pleasing to 
all tastes. 



P!(gs^©® 



090 15 wmm 




We are open all summer, 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Mon.-Fri. and selected Saturdays. 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES - GREETING CARDS - CALCULATORS - NOTE 
BOOKS - SNEAKERS - TENNIS BALLS - PENS & PENCILS. ART SUP- 
PLIES-KITES-T-SHIRTS-STATIONERY. HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS - 
RECORDS - FILM - HEAD GEAR. CANDY - FRISBEES - JEWELRY - 
GIFTS - WATCHES. 
... And a lot of other things you might not think we carry. 



^ 



UNIVERSITY STORE 

Campui Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 01002 



(413)545 2619 



IT 

THEnNASTwnr 




it It it It it it It 

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THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



MONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



MONDAY, JUNE, 24, 1974 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



11 



Group performing Bond p\aY \Workshops aval/ab/e 



The Summer Theatre Ensemble is 
proud to announce that English 
playwright Edward Bond's piay^^ 
Narrow Road to the Deep North, 
will be presented on the UMass 



Hair here 



"...Long, straight, curly, fuz- 
zy,. ..oily, greasy, scraggly, 
nasty,..." Hair is coming to UMass. 
This 1967 Broadway hit will be 
presented in Bowker Auditorium 
July 29th through August 3rd. The 
play's original theme, an inside view 
of contemporary youth, has been 
held intact, while changes have 
been made to keep its social and 
political satire in tune with current 
world issues. 

The rock-musical will be per- 
formed by the Connecticut Music 
Theatre Company. CMT is an 
educational company sponsored by 
the Sate of Connecticut through 
Greater Hartford Community 
College. The company works under 
the direction of a staff of 
professionals, one being producer- 
director Jack Tierney, who holds a 
B.A. in music education and a 
Masters in Performance from 
UMass. Tierney considers the over- 
riding spirit of the company to be 
"a commitment to the essence of 
professionalism." The company is 
said to represent some of the finest 
college age talent on the East coast. 



MEET THE 





AT THE HUHOr^-U 




103 M PLEASANT ST. 
253-9080 

PIZZAS TOO!! 



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campus August 8, 9, and 10. 

Virtually unknown and surprisingly 
rarely produced in the country, 
Bond is currently regarded as one 
of England's most exciting and 
theatrical authors — second only to 
Harold Pinter. Critics have hailed 
him as "the worthy successor to 
Bertholt Brecht." 

Utilizing Brecht's "Epic Theatre" 
techniques of improvisation, story- 
telling, movement, and song. 
Narrow Road presents a fictional 
Odyssey of the Japanese poet 
Basho's search for 'enlightenment' 
Bond calls the play 'a comedy* — 
the setting is "either the 18th, 19th 
or 20th centuries" — and the varied 
and humorous people Basho en- 
counters range from a crotchety 
English Colonel and his dotty, 
tambourine-shaking wife eager to 
bring 'Civilization' to the heathens, 
to a Warlord deperately trying to 
create an empire while hampered 
by the antics of a chorus of Shinto 
priests (one of whom has got his 
head stuck in a clay pot). 

The Summer Theatre Ensemble's 
production will be played in an 
"environmental" setting, in- 
corporating such elements as 
Japanese dance and English music 
hall, and the audience will follow 
Basho as he makes his journey to 
the North. S.T.E. is pleased to offer 
the Pioneer Valley an opportunity 



to experience this dynamic play, 
performed in a freshly innovative 
and exciting manner. 
Plan now to reserve August 8, 9, 
or 10 for a rare evening of quality 
theatre, and join Basho as he 
journeys on the Narrow Road to the 
Deep North. 

Roister Doisters 

This summer Roister Doisters, an 
on-campus theater group, is 
producing a Dinner Theater at the 
Top of the Campus Restaurant. On 
the weekends of June 27, 28, 29, 
and July 11, 12, 13, Neil Simon's 
work will be featured in an all 
evening program of entertainment. 
The program includes music from 
Promises, Promises, such as "I'll 
Never Fall in Live Again" and the 
title song, and from Sweet Charity: 
"Big Spender" and "If My Friends 
Could See My Now." 

Short scenes will be presented 
from some of Neil Simon's plays: 
The Odd Couple, Barefoot In The 
Park, and Plaza Suite. There is no 
admission charge or cover charge. 
Reservations for dinner should be 
made in advance at the Top of the 
Campus Restaurant, UMass or 
phone 549-6000. Dinner will be 
served from 5:30 The entertainment 
will start at 8:15 p.m. 



Workshops Available 

THEATRE ENSEMBLE SPON- 
SORE "OPEN HOUSE" 

Interested in the Performing Arts? 
The Summer Theatre Ensemble is 
sponsoring an Open House on 
Wed. evening June 26 at 7:00 p.m. 
in CC163 to introduce its free 
Theatre Workshops. 

Sponsored by the Summer 
Program Council, the workshops 
are designed to provide summer 
students the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in varied and unique 
theatrical experiences. The 
Workshops are led by UMass 
Graduate students and recent 
graduates and include: 

Acting-Directing Workshop 

Acting is doing. This workshop 
will allow actors to gain experience 
by doing. The emphasis will be on 
characterization. Scripts will be 
chosen in view of the actors needs 
and various improvisational 
techniques will be employed in 
helping them find the characters. 
The workshop shall culminate in 
performance of the plays chosen. 
Film Acting Workshop 

A "once in a lifetime" chance to 
act in a real movie. Film acting is 
unique. Learn what the actor is 
really facing when his is sta-^ding 
before the camera and the director 
yells "Roll 'em!" 



Voice and Diction Workshop 

Including basic voice and 
movement studies in the Lessac 
method of vocal production. 
Concentration on building total 
body relaxation and enriching vocal 
life. To culminate in a partial or 
whole Reader's Theatre production 
of Dylan Thomas' Under Milkwood. 
Theatre for Children Workshop 
Not "Gee-Golly-GoshI" children's 
theatre, but a workshop in the 
techniques of performing for 
children in an improvisational way 
that delights, but doesn't con- 
descend. Performances are 
planned. 

Movement and Dance Workshop 
Exploration of the use of 
movement and dance in creating a 
theatrical event. Improvisational 
movement pieces will serve as 
method of establishing character 
and plot. Beginners welcome 
The Workshops will run June 27- 
July 25 meeting three days a week 
at times to be arranged by the 
members of each Workshop. There 
is absolutely no charge and final 
productions will serve as the 
culmination of the four weeks. 
All interested (and unsure) 
students are cordially invited to 
come Wednesday evening to 
CC163 at which time the Workshop 
leaders will discuss in detail the 
various offerings. 



to Boston? 



There are 2 branches 

Of Boston's largest stereo 

exchange right here 

in the valley... with the 

same great equipment 

at the same great price I 




I tech hifi I 

^^ Quality Components at the Right Price -^^ 

259 Triangle St. Amherst 549-2610 
186 Main St. Northampton 586-2552 





SUHDAY 


JIGHDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


TIlimSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 




7 a.m. 

to 
11 a.m. 


Pellclciia 
I'usic 
with 
Charles Manr 

& 
Bill Hassan 


tlusic 
with 
Scott 
Bachennan 


The 
Captain 
Equinox 
Wake-up 
Show 


Wale-up 
with 
your 

RaRtlme 
Duck 


Woke -up 
with 
your 

Ragtime 
Duck 


Soul 
Music 

with 
Larkey 

Mays 


Music 
with 
Stu 
MacDonald 


11 a.m. 
to 
3 p.m. 


Sunday 

Classics 

with 

Mark 

Nathanson 


Soul 

with 

Phyllis 

Johnson 


Music 

with 

Rocket 


Music 

with 

Jack 

Harper 


Music 

with 

Susan 

Fugle 


Music 

with 

Susan 

Fugle 


Music 
with 
Fran 

Dance 




3 p.m. 
to 
7 P-m- 


Music 

with 

John 

Greely 


Music 
with 
Jack 

Harper 


Music 

with 

Crazy 

Nancy 


Contempor. 

Black 

Music 

with 

Charles 

Mann 


Music 

with 

Captain 

Equinox 


Music 
with 
Scott 
Bachennan 


Music 

with 

Crazy 

Nancy 


— 


7 p.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


Jubilation 

Jazz 
Part One 

with 
Ah-Wil 


Music 
with 
Stu 
Mac Donald 


Music 

with 

Jack 

Harper 


Music 

with 

Crazy 

Nancy 


Music 
with 
Stu 
MacDonald 


.Music 
with 
Stu 
MacDonald 


Soul 
Music 

with 
Charles 

Mann 


11 p.m. 
to 
3 a.m. 


Jubilation 

Jazz 

Part Two 

wi*h 

Dick 

Moulding 


Music 
with 
Hark 
nathanson 


Contempor. 
Black 
Music 

with 
Larkey 

Mays 


Music 
with 
Scott 
Bacheraian 


Latin 
Music 

with 
Emikan 

Sudan 


Music 

with 

Rocket 


Music 
with 
Dale 
Cook 




3 a.m. 

to 
T a.m. 




Graveyard 

with 

Ron 
Bogatkovski 




Graveyard 

with 

Ron 

Bogatkowski 









WMUA plans big 
program schedule 



For the third consecutive year 
WMUA, at 91.1 on the FM dial will 
be broadcasting all summer long. 
Currently broadcasting 20 hours a 
day, the station will shortly be 
going 24 hours. 

Perhaps the best way to describe 
MUA would be a progressive 
station in both musical, news, and 
public affairs programming. The 
music is the number one product of 
the station. All the disc-jockeys try 
to provide the widest variation of 
music in the forms of jazz, blues, 
bluegrass, rock, and folk. The 



Black radio 



Black Mass Communication 
project has provided an opportunity 
for Black students at the University 
of Massachusetts with a chance to 
develop skills in mass com- 
munications while they pursue their 
regular academic courses. As a 
result, several students have been 
encouraged to pursue mass 
communications as a major, and 
also as an outgrowth under the 
auspices of BMCP a com- 
munications production workshop- 
class has been developed to aid in 
production skills, newscasting, 
interviews, editing, etc. 



tastes of each disc-jockey con- 
stitute much of the variety, 
requests from listeners also help. 

MUA also provides national and 
local news coverage throughout 
the day. Public affairs programming 
includes a talk program, every 
Monday through Thursday at 6:15 
p.m. Hosted by Dick Moulding, Off 
the Hook allows the listener to call 
in and let his voice be heard, 
whether the topic be racial im- 
balance, town politics, or open 
forum. The Womens Show, Gay 
Break, and Film Making Quotes are 
some of the other Public Affairs 
shows to be aired this summer. 

We invite people to come down to 
the station at your convenience 
anytime this summer. Our staff will 
be glad to show you around the 
place. If you wish to be part of the 
station, Scott Bacherman, Program 
Director will be glad to help you get 
started. WMUA'S Schedule ap- 
pears at left. 



UMass Poliea 

5-3111 



The 



Rusty Nail Inn 



' A I Tilt: (.A IKS 
OF SMITH COl.l.ECt; 

i/CADEIvTY: 



NORTHAMPTON 



• • • • 



presents 



TONITE 



WHEEZE 



Tt KSDAY & WKDNKSDAY MTE 

Real Tears 

THl RSDAY-SLND AY MTK 

Clean Living 



Htc. 17. SuiKhrlainl 665-1937 



Take Rte. 116 north, take left after Tennis 
Academy and follow to end. Take another left. 200 
vards and you're there!! 




^r.: 



starts WEDNESDAY .v 
"ZARDOZ" plus 
"THE CONCERT 
FOR BANGLADESH" 




Eves. 
7:30 &| 
9:15 

Now Playing 



AMHERSTCi<«»«« 



(un. 
at. 



AMITY ST. 



253 5426 



In 

|:00 



Calvin Theater, Northampton, '/JMash" 



NOW SHQWINC. AT CONVfcriiFNTlY lOCATfeU 

CAMPUS ^>re*«^ 



IJ' . ..ft (i, f . (>. .'A ■ 



tnh Hill lijv )*< ^lln^■^ li>.,iirit ihiiiMijtioiii Mj\\jihiisrlls Sr« HJ^^lp^hlf^ Vnmonl Rhudc hiind, Nf* Viitk, Nf* |rrsf>. Prnntylvinii, Michifjn, jnd Ohio 




7:15 

* 
9:15 

A CHILLING 

TOPICAL 

THRILLER 




(>f Class 



i . :t I 
ALSO tTABaiNe IN 

D. H. LAWRENCE'S 

WOMEN IN LOVE' 

AT 9:00 




STARTS WEDNESDAY 



12 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



AAONDAY, JUNE 24, 1974 



Get your Stop&Shopsworfh for 



those 




\ 1 1 



M?oiit,eat voiit days. 




Starts Monday, Jane 24 - Saturday, June 29 

STOP & SHOP 
in HADLEY-AMHERST 
Route 9 
at the Hadley-Amherst Line. 

8:00a.m.-10:00p.m., 
Mon.-Sat. 

Get your Stop & Shopsworth! 



Welchade 
Fruit Drinks 

RED GRAPE, FRUIT PUNCH 
OR GRAPE 




Geisha Solid 
Wliite Tuna 




B&M Baked 
Pea Beans 





mwwm 



WITH THIS COUPON AND A $5 PURCHASE 
Good Mon June 24 - Sat Jun« 29 - Limit on« boltle p.. customer 

Sun Glory Soda 

Asst.Flavors-Diet or Regular 




Whole Kosher 
Dill Pickles 




Cllquot Club 
Beverages 




32 oz. 

No- 
Return 
Btls. 




Vlasic Relishes 

SWEET, HOT DOG, 
HAMBURG OR SWEET INDIA 




All Stop Sl Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience. 

A Butterball Broiler 



Ittms otiffrtf tor saic not 

m»labl« in cat* tots or 

to ol^er retail Ocairr^ 

or Mliolotalfrt 



X I IHTlif WWIittHIWlfil 




MEAT ON 
MUSHROOM 



Meaty little birds that baste themselves while they cook — 

turn out moist and tender and delicious. For rotisserie barbecuing, insert meat thermom- 
eter in thickest part of thigh. Place drip pan made of foil in front of coals. Cook until meat 
thermometer reaches 185° 



IS atii rally aged for tenderness! 




enaerness : ^w 




No other supermarket in America . . . not one . . . has the 
meat preparation facilities to offer beef as naturally 
tender, juicy and full of flavor as Stop & Shops "Quality-Protected" 
beef . . . better tasting beef. If they want to, other supermarkets 
can match Stop & Shop's prices on what they call similar cuts of 
beef. But until they match our facilities, they can't match the quality 
of our beef, whether they want to or not. 

Plan a meal with a delicious Stop & Shop canned ham ! 

3Ib.CaiiiiedIIaiii ^±?9 



We know food takes a big part of your weekly budget And 
we're working to help you stretch that budget the best 
way we Know — by bringing you the lowest price we can 



for quality meat — like our fine canned ham Lean from 
end to end, moist, delicious, and good for more than one 
meal, it's a timely value. 



More all week specials for barbecue cooking, 

Prhno Italian Sausage %xWhlte Gem Chicken Breast 

Mr ^r^iyi^ When you buy U.S. Grade "A". White Gem tf^#%f* 




HOT OR SWEET 



Barbecue then top with 
tried peppers deiiciout' 




When you buy U.S. Grade "A", White Gem 
chickens, you buy the sweetest tasting 
chicken that money can buy. 



^Bl ^WW^^T^ I W#^WI a VvN ^^^^VV^^^W 




Frozen Flounder Fillets 

Jutt bake or try then SH9 

•dd tartar sauce and lemon * I 

I 't 

Dtep 8** Treats Ttsuosi* 
Eldorado Salad Shrimp 



JlJiai W ci O DatHWSpaciattJ 

«V»il.ABlt N STPBfS *!'M A SfBviCE DEu 

Imported Boiled Ham 

spa 



Our dell IS chock full ot 
daliciout summertime foods 



1 le M|w 
l(M OQt 



Nepco Cold Cuts p°i;V?-"-«-u. o 

Stop A Shop OeU Franks \K^Xi' ' 

Finnish Swiss Cheese ,V 
Mother Goose Liverwurst 



16 

"' 99* 

,5 79* 



Cod meals from Stap&ShopH 
^^ Summer Kitchen! 

■ • "iffvi Our chefs do the cooking, while you take the compliments! 

V^S^ 30 oz. Potato Salad ° ° 

^^J^|o^P^Vnec< plastic beach pail with potato salad 

Ham and Cheese Sub Sandwicli ..r.'^r... -69' 



89' 




AVAiLASlE IN STOAES W.Th A SERwCE DEli 



v. 



"Quality-Protected" Roast Beef > 89' 

Cooked to perfection shced to your order 

Macaroni and Beef 79'« ^^Rice Pudding !"" 69' 

NIW mOM Gun KITCHEN* ^^^^^ BUY 1 LB - QET 1 PNEI. 




B.C. Orange-Apricot Drink 

Gino Spaghetti Sauce 

Stop & Shop Spaghetti Sauce 

MEAT MEATLESS OR MUSHROOM 

Ocean Spray Cranberry Cocktail 
Kraft Barbecue Sauce 
Stop & Shop Mustard spicy sRo^m 
Gloria Spanish Stuffed Olives 
9" Paper Plates - 100 Count 
Vlasic Kosher Dill Spears 



1^' 39« 
'*jI' 69« 
"," 69« 



4(02 

Btl 

Bit 
9o< 



Whilt IH 
Pasitl 



69* 
59« 
15« 
45* 
Pk, 89« 

65* 



501 

Jv 



24.2 

en 



# 1 IliM'WCli MZW Fm lift 



SssSLemonade 2^45*^ 

us Grade A fancy 

Sparkool Assorted Drinks 

Oe<» $1 

Q Ciiu I 



Lemon-Lime. Raspberry-Lemon, Fruit 
Punch. Grape Drink or Orange Orink 

Birds Eye Awake 
Hawaiian Punch -Red 
Swanson Chicken Dinner 
Shoestring Potatoes slim jim brand 
Stop & Shop 10 Pack Pizza 
Mrs. Paul's Onion Rings 



3',^»1 

'?^39* 

";i.'"69* 

Vi 69* 

"^r99* 

9 01 

Pkg 



59* 



Liglit n' Lively Ice Milk 99' 



SEALTEST — NATURAL — Vj GAL CARTON 

Taste O'Sea Fried Clams 
French Fried Shrimp taste o sea 
Chock "o" Nuts Pound Cake 
Birds Eye Cool Whip 
Stop & Shop Ice Cream e flavors 
Caterers Sherbet s flavors 
Stop & Shop Choc-lit Covers 



Z 79* 

*P.°,' 99* 
V\V 79* 

9u 
Cont 

« Corns ' 

« Conis ' 
20 Count QQe 
35 or Pltg *« 



55' 



:r: 



too; 
Pug 



iLMini-Prteed Self Service DdG 

Colonial Sliced Bacon 

^^^ 1 POUND PACi«AGE ^m 0^ p 

^^y A great way to start trie day. t \M 
^\jf Get your Stop & Shopsworth' f ^J 



Colonial Tasty Ten Franks 
Colonial Beef Franks 
Smoked Pork Butts 



1 lb 
Pkg 

'nl 89* 

colonial Otr QQ( 

Waitr Aoatd lb *• 



^f Cheeseboard 

SHARP CHEDDAR BAR 

Shrimp Cocl(tail-3 Pacl( 

SEAMAID — 4 oz. JARS 

Colombo Yogurt « havors 3 
Stop & Shop American Cheese 

iNDlV'UUAU' ANAPPfD WHITE OR YELLOW 

Borden Country Store Spread 

SWISS OR CHfnOAR 

Breakstone Sour Cream 
Crescent or Cinnamon Rolls ^sSop* 
Reddi Whip Whipped Cream 
Mrs. Filbert's Margarine 
Kraft ""inTpEr Swiss Cheese 



89' 

99' 



8 01 
Conl^ 
12 0! 

Pkg 
I 01 

Com 



89* 
89* 

69* 



16 o; EQc 
Cow M* 

3 "" »1 

7o< CQe 

Cin wT 



I POUND PKG 

QUARTERS 



Pkg 



49* 
89* 



Handschumacher Knocicwurst 

99' 



CATCH WEIGHT 

Old fashioned value like this, 
gives you your Stop & Shopsworth 



Colonial Family Pack ?<>) LB PKG »•' 79* 

BOLOGNA OR LIVERWURST 

Colonial Sliced Bologna ;:; 99* 

Colonial Sliced Cold Cuts \r, 59* 

BOlO P4P LUIURV OLIVE OR LUNCHEON LOAf 



SANTA ROSA 



tl HW'Meil lakanr tMeMi I 

S$t Daisy White Bread 

3»$1 

1 




REGULAR OR 
THIN SLICED 



Banana Tea Bread 2 

0«teNutBrMdl3oi or Cranberry Nut Bread 12(» 

Stop & Shop Oatmeal Bread 
Stop & Shop Fudge Cake 
Kitchen Cupboard Donuts 
Stop & Shop Lemon Pie 
Stop & Shop Rhubarb Pie 



12' J 

01 

loavtj 



16 N 9Q| 

Loaf "• 

'^?69* 

STOP t SHOP ant 

II N PK6 ot 12 "^ 

xrw* 

»« 69* 



put 




HMUMI 



1889^ 



Sanitary Naplcins c.* f:Q< 

JTOP » SHOP — SUPER OR REO '^l UO 

69' 



1^ Right Guard 



5 Of CAN 



S REGULAR NATURAL. POWDER 
OR UNSCENTED DEODORANT 



IG-year old Perfect Master 



Guru will greet 10,000 here 



Guru Maharaj Ji is coming. 

The "16-year old perfect 
master", religious leader of 5-8 
million people around the world, 
will be speaking to an estimated 
10,000 devotees here July 4-7. 

Called "Guru Puja 74", it marks 
the first major conference of the 
Divine Light Mission ever held in 
the Eastern U.S. 

Ted Tannenbaum, an advance 
man here for the Mission, said the 
Guru's followers will be flying in on 



chartered flights from such places 
as Argentina, Bolivia, Puerto Rico, 
Venezuela, Los Angeles and 
Denver. They will be living in 
Southwest and Central, paying the 
University about $40,000. 

Tannenbaum said UMass was 
selected because "it's a beautiful 
place and well located." He said the 
availability of Southwest was also a 
key factor. 

Full activities have been 
scheduled for July 5, 6, and 7. The 



Guru himself will address the 
gathering from a specially con- 
structed 35-ft. high dome by the 
Southwest athletic field. He is 
expected to speak about 9:45 p.m. 
each day and the public may attend 
at no charge. 

At one point the Guru will be 
elevated on a jeep and driven by his 
followers who may touch his feet 
and eat food he has blessed, 
organizers say. 

Activities have also been planned 



by the Campus Pond. Films will be 
shown in the Student Union 
Ballroom and the public may at- 
tend. 

Laura Kappelman, another 
organizer, said Chicago Seven 
defendant Rene Davis will bi in 
attendance. She also said about 
seven Mahatmas, or disciples, plan 
to be here. 

Other Divine Light Mission 
conference's will be held this year 
in Copenhagen, Delhi and 
Australia. MIKE KNEELAND 




Guru Maharaj Ji 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 2 




MONDAY, JUNE li, 1974 




Three days of classes and they give me this bool< to 
read. ...and I don't even like Mr. Greenjeans. 

i 

Low key registration 



Some 3000 students registered 
for summer school Monday. It was 
a pleasant experience for students 
used to hot days and long lines in 
Boyden gymnasium. 

Registration was scheduled to 
run to noon time. By 9:30 nearly 
two thirds of the students had 
registered. 

The Summer Activities Com- 
mittee has planned an active 
summer which will include concerts 
by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, 
Norm Connors and Bo Diddley. 
Numerous theatrical productions 
have also been scheduled. 

The Intramural Office has also 
been busy planning their program 
which will include Softball, 
volleyball, and badminton com- 
petition for men and women. 

\See Monday's special 
registration issue of Solstice for a 
complete listing of all summer 
events. Classes began Tuesday and 
will run eight weeks. 1 

In addition, the Division of 
Continuing Education is offering a 
highly diversified line-up of summer 
programs, including Arts Extension 
courses, conferences, workshops, 
films, concerts, readings and 
exhibits. 

Some sample events: Arts and 
the Penal System, Ethnic Culture in 
America, Feminism and Aesthetics 
(courses); Black Community 



Theater, Amateur String Quartets 
(conferences); Creative sTudy in 
Music Education (eight workshops 
coordinated by Dr. William Gaver); 
Communication in the Arts (ten 
workshops led by Peter Marion); 
Film and Other Media, Dance 
Workshop and Residency 
(workshops). Also being planned 
are a "jazz mobile" and an African- 
American music program. 

Toward Tomorrow, a symposium 
of alternatives, is also being 
sponsored by the Division of 
Continuing Education. From June 
17 to July 5, it will provide con- 
centrated week-long learning 
experiences with an emphasis on 
positive action and participation. 
Alternative Energy Sources, 
Homesteading and Alternative 
Environments, Miscellaneous Neat 
Things, Alternative Food 
Production and Distribution, and 
Alternative You's are the major 
areas of concentration presented 
by the program. 

The School of Education, in 
conjunction with the Division of 
Continuing Education, is presenting 
"Summer '74," and educational 
workshop program. Sample topics: 
Moving Toward an Integrated Day 
Classroom, Computer Uses in 
Teaching, Personal Growth Ap- 
proaches to Mathematics, Death 
Education, Humanistic Social 
Education and Movement and 
Creative Dramatics in the 
Classroom. 



UMies free Daniels 



By MARK VOGLER 
An effort by UMass students to 
"free" a 29-year-old mentally 
retarded man from prison has 
succeeded. 

Following months of intense 
pressure on the Governor's office, 
former Belchertown State School 
resident Russell Daniels was 
transfered back to the institution in 
an unprecedented Massachusetts 
judicial case. 

Daniels' homecoming came 52 
days after Gov. Francis W. Sargent 
told the UMass support group that 
a seldom used legal statute existed 
which would enable the st6te 
Department of Mental Health to 
assume responsibility of the 
resident from the Departmentof 
Corrections. 

Daniels was convicted of murder 
last year while living on his own 
after having spent 13 years at the 
Belchertown institution. 

He was serving a life sentence at 
Norfolk Prison. The sole basis of his 
conviction was a signed confession 
— which following an April 20 
meeting with students Gov. 
Sargent conceded was "illegally 
attained." 

At the time, Sargent called 
Daniels' case "a tragedy" and 
acknowledged failure on his ad- 
ministration's part for not providing 
adequate human services. 

Daniels' attorneys, Arthur J. 
Hickerson of Springfield and Beryl 
Cohen of Brookline, will appeal the 
case in September before the 
state's Supreme Judicial Court on 
the grounds that their client was 
denied his constitutional rights by 
Springfield police. 

He was picked up Aug. 22, 1972 
to be questioned as a "witness" to 
the murder of 83-year-old Mrs. 
Klara Haas, who lived in the 
apartment complex where Daniels 
was a janitor. 

According to police testimony at 
the trial, he was arrested by the 
Springfield police and then in- 
terrogated for seven hours — being 
given no food, drink or outside 
assistance. 

Although Conn. Television 
station WTIC (Hartford) produced 
an award winning documentary a 
year ago entitled "A Nine-Year-Old 
in Norfolk," it took the pressure of 
the UMass students under the 
guidance of Dr. Benjamin Ricci, a 
professor, to bring the bizarre 
cirecumstances surrounding 
Daniels' incarceration to light in 
Massachusetts. 

April 3, Ricci and the students 
launched their appeal to reopen the 
Daniels' case by sponsoring 
"Russell Daniels Night." Although 
Gov. Sargent was invited, he 
neither attended nor responded. 

Several weeks later Sargent 



refused to meet with group 
^presentatives who waited outside 
lis office for three hours with a suit 
case of over 700 letters asking the 
Governor to check into the matter. 
Then on the eve of the April 20 
meeting with students, Sargent's 
office contacted Daniels' family and 
notified them of an existing statute 
which would make possible the 
transfer to Belchertown. 

The following day, the Governor 
was grilled for nearly an hour, 
admitting that the case should have 
been treated by his office with 
greater dignity. Sargent agreed that 
the Daniels' transfer was a semi- 
vindication of sorts. 

Ricci, who earlier in the year 
spearheaded a successful lav/ suit 
against the state for inhumane 
conditions existing at the in- 
stitution, labeled Sargent's move 
"political." 

"Obviously he saw this thing 
reaching a crisis, so what more 
opportune time would there be to 
make such an announcement than 
the night before," he said. 

"The sad part is that he as 



Governor had the power to do so a 
long time ago. It didn't have to take 
a confrontation between the 
governor and his Human Services 
Secreatry to accomplish this." 

Hampden County District At- 
torney Mathew Ryan also saw 
Sargent's action as "political," but 
for different reasons. 

Ryan, who prosecuted the case 
against Daniels, said he hoped that 
the Governor hasn't succumbed to 
pressure." 

"If they are talking about putting 
this man on the street again, then I 
think that some citizens may be 
over concerned of this matter, and I 
hope that it isn't something that 
may come back and haunt the 
Governor," he said. 

"Afterall, this man has been tried 
and found guilty of murder. I hope 
for the sake of all that it isn't a 
question of political pressure, but 
rather in the best interests of 
everyone." 

Belchertown State School Supt. 

William Jones said Daniels will be 

entitled "full grounds priviledges" 

and would be treated "iust like 

(Continued on P. 5) 



Arts Service offers 
a cultured summer 



BY RUDOLPH JONES 
The Arts Extention Service 
was created by the division of 
Continuing Education to 
develop outreach programs to 
serve the Commonwealth, 
utilizing the resources of the 
University of Massachusetts 
Departments of music, art, 
dance, and theatre. 

According to the Director, 
Stan Rosenberg, The Arts 
Extention Service consists of a 
series of Community outreach 
programs designed to make the 
arts resources of the University 
more accessible to 

Massachusetts communities. In 
its capacity as arts liaison, arts 
extention seeks to help the 
citizens of the Commonwealth 
realize the benifits that come 
from understanding and 
participating in the cultural life 
of their communities of the 
commonwealth. 

Beginning July, the Arts 
Extention Service will present a 
summer Arts Institute, a collage 
of courses and conferences, 
seminars, workshops, and 
performances, which will last 
until August 31. The institute 
states Mr. Rosenberg will 
embody David Amaran's "no 



more walls" concept which 
strives to break down the 
barriers which exists between 
creator and performer, per- 
former and audience, creator 
and audience, and University 
and community. 

In addition to the Arts Ex- 
tention Service, Continuing 
Education's Academic services 
will also offer thirteen courses 
this summer relating to the arts. 
In this way, Mr. Rosenberg 
asserts, academic services 
hopes to show its support for 
the arts and the "no more 
walls" philosopny. Also offered 
for the first time this summer by 
Continuing Ed will be a one 
week residency of the New 
England Dinosour Dance 
Company. As part of their 
residency several public per- 
formances will be offered in- 
cluding an outdoor par- 
ticipation of performance for 
children. In its continual efforts 
to reach out into the com- 
munity the beginners workshop 
to be offered during this 
residency will be held not on 
the University campus, but 
rather in local surrounding 
communities of Western Mass. 



m 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



Page 2 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 




Page 3 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



I 



Photo Center Photograpns 



Diploma day flops 



It was one of the more 
memorable graduations in recent 
years: an organizational disaster. 

Ceremonies for the 3300 
graduating students and their 
10,000 relatives and friends had 
been scheduled for the Alumni 
Stadium. But it rained. 

So the organizers decided to 
delay the ceremonies one hour and 
move the ceremonies to the 
Boyden Gymnasium. 



Needless to say, not everyone 
could get inside and those who 
could not find a seat were told they 
would have to leave the gym, with 
the University's regrets, on doctors' 
orders. Again, needless to say, the 
notion did not go over well with the 
families, though many did leave to 
escape the torturing humidity. 

Outside it looked as though it 
might be clearing so the organizers 
decided to hold the ceremonies at 
the original site, the Alumni 
Stadium. This suggestion was 
greeted with loud applause. 



Ceremonies finally began at the 
stadium some two hours late with 
promises that some speeches 
would be shortened. 

Senior Therese M. Hoffmann 
told the audience that people still 
hear only what they want to hear 
and they "continue to talk to each 
other not with each other." She 
then asked the audience to recall 
some of America's good listeners, a 
list of eight women including 
Sojourner Truth and Jeannette 
Rankin. 

"We need to rechannel com- 
munication in America — the men 
who have been doing most of the 
talking and policy-making must 
yield now and learn to listen," she 
said. 

Hoffman was followed by Bobbie 

LaPorte who said the U.S. is ex- 
periencing a state of moral 
paralysis. "In retrospect," she said, 
"the mood of this year's seniors has 
travelled a path from intense 
political activity to a retreating, 
passive state." 



She said frustration and defeat 
caused the seniors to lower their 
sights and "compromise those 
goals and ideas." 

Chancellor Bromery did not 
deliver his speech but he had 
planned to speak on the post- 
industrial society, a society based 
on human services rather than 
industrial production. 

When Elliot Richardson took the 
podium the audience seemed to be 
waiting for strong, anti-Nixon 
statements. They never came. 

He did, however, talk about 
"post-Watergate" morals saying it 
is the duty of Americans to demand 
moral integrity of their leaders. The 
former Attorney General said he 
could not disagree more with a 
Watergate defendant's statement 
that youth should stay out of 
politics. 

Eleven men and women recieved 
honory degrees from UMass 
president Robert Wood. Included 
were noted photographer Ansel 
Adams and House Majority Leader 
Thomas (Tip) O'Neill. 



Metric Center here aiding community 



A resource and educational 
center for metric conversion has 
been established by the Division of 
Continuing Education. 

The Northeast Metric Resource 
Center (NMRC) will serve business, 
industry, professional groups, trade 
associations and educational in- 
stitutions throughout the Com- 
monwealth and in nearby states. 

Among immediate NMRC plans 
are a series of newsletters and 



The NMRC planning committee 
includes three UMass-Amherst 
faculty members selected for their 
background in metric education — 
Engineering Professor Klaus E. 
Kroner, Professor of Management 
Kenan E. Sahin and Science 

special bulletins, workshops and 
seminars for business and industry, 
programs for educators, a library 
with teaching aids, and an inquiry 
and referral service. 



Education Professor Klaus Schuttz. 
They will work with Robert C. 
Sellers, management consultant 
and metric advisor to the National 
Association of Manufacturers. 

A brochure is available from the 
Northeast Metric Research Center, 
Division of Continuing Education, 
Hills North, UMass Amherst, 01002. 



THE SUMMER 




t«liiiftl 



EDITORS 



Michael D. Kneeland 



Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 




Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad- 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoons, and letters represent the personal views of the authors. 




I 



Research project 
on Cape Cod 




A team of 10 faculty and 
students here has begun a major 
research project on the impact of 
people and vehicles on the ecology 
of the Cape Cod National Seashore. 
A series of field studies at the 
Cape will continue through the 
summer, supported by contracts 
from the National Park Service. 
Results of the studies will be used 
by the Park Service in future 
planning to meet public recreation 
needs at the Seashore, according 
to Dr. Paul Godfrey, Assistant 
Professor of Botany and leader of 
the UMass National Park Service 
Cooperative Research Unit. 

"The basic goal is to understand 
all we can about the natural system 
and what happens when man 
interferes with it," Dr. Godfrey said. 
A major part of the project will be 
the most detailed study yet made of 
the effect of recreational vehicles 
on the ecology of beaches and 
dunes on the Cape. 

Three sites at the Cape Cod 
National Seashore have been set 
aside as study areas, the main one 
in Provincetown, near the Race 
Point swimming beach. One study 
will focus on four-wheel drive 
vehicle effect on dune vegetation; 
another will study what vehicles do 
to the bbdch ecosystem the area 
from the dunes to the low tide line. 

Biologists will study how vehicles 
interact with beach life from 
microscopic organisms to nesting 
terns; and geologists will look at 
what riart vehicle traffic plays in 



overall geological changes at tne 
Seashore. Geological studies are 
being done under the direction of 
Dr. Alan Niedoroda, Assistant 
Professor of Geology and director 
of the UMass Coastal Research 
Center. 

In addition to vehicle studies, 
team members will do research on 
beach erosion, water supply, 
ecological history and other areas. 
A report on the summer's work will 
be made to the National Park 
Service in December of this year. 
The team includes faculty, 
graduate students and un- 
dergraduates from the departments 
of Botany, Geology and Zoology at 
UMass, funded through the 
National Park Service Cooperative 
Research Unit in the Institute for 
Man and His Environment. 

Dr. Godfrey's background in- 
cludes six years of ecological study 
in association with his wife 
Melinda, a marine zoologist, on the 
beaches of North Carolina's Outer 
Banks where he worked for the 
National Park Service as a Research 
Biologist on Cape Lookout and 
Cape Hatteras National Seashores 
before joining the UMass faculty in 
1970. Several ecological studies are 
continuing on the Outer Banks 
within the program of the UMass- 
National Park Service Cooperative 
Research Unit and have con- 
tributed to the National Pafl< 
Service's changing philosophy of 
coastal management on these 
Seashores. 



Park Service researching natural systems 



BY HELEN SWARTZ 



A number of important researcli projects 
are starting this summer under the auspices 
of the National Park Service Cooperative 
Research Unit recently established here in 
the Institute for Man and His Environment. 
Participants include faculty and students 
from several campus departments. 

Leader of the unit is Dr. Paul Godfrey of 
the Botany Department, who explains the 
basic goals of research in progess: "We want 
to understand how the natural systems of 
coastal regions and barrier islands work from 
an ecological point of view, and use this 
knowledge to define management options in 
National Park Service areas." In view of the 



commitment of the NPS to meet the public's 
recreational needs, research is focusing on 
the human impact - especially that of 
visitors — on natural systems. 

For the past six years, Dr. Godfrey and his 
wife, Melinda, a marine zoologist, have been 
conducting ecological studies on North 
Carolina's Outer Banks. Their major interest 
has been in comparing a natural, essentially 
undeveloped barrier island system (Cape 
Lookout proposed National Seashore) to its 
artifically "stabilized" counterpart (Cape 
Hatteras National Seashore), and 
discovering the ways in which their 
vegetation adapt to changes in the en- 



vironment. 

Continuing work in this area is Richard 
Travis, a doctoral student in Botany, and 
research assistant April Stein, who are 
studying the effects of oceanic overwash in 
the vegetation of relatively stabilized areas 
and looking at ways in which NPS managers 
can make use of the information they 
assemble. 

Work now in progress at Cape Cod 
National Seashore includes research into the 
effects of recreational vehicles on beaches 
and other coastal features. In com- 
plementary and almost unique studies, 
researchers in the fields of ecology and 



geomorphology are seeking to discover what 
happens when the natural system is 
disturbed and how much dislocation it can 
tolerate. 

Projects directed by Dr. Alan Niedoroda of 
the Geology Department are under way to 
determine the possible effects, and their time 
sequence, of recreational vehicles on the 
geological structure of a beach and the 
geomorphic effects of driving through sand 
dunes. Working with Dr. Niedoroda are 
graduate student Richard Limeburner and 
undergraduate Peter Johnson. 




Index goes to press 



Bluewall 



The Editor-in-Chief of the Index, 
the UMass yearbook, says this 
year's edition should be one of the 
best ever published. 

Alan Chapman said American 
Yearbook, the publisher, has 
especially gone to great pains to 
produce the desired cover. 
Chapman recently retumed from 
Topeka, Kansas where he in- 
spected and artistically corrected 
the cover which involved grain 
operations, embossing, metal 
overlay, silk screen and overtone 
rub in its production. 

The Index editor said most 
companies do these operations 
separately and this marks the first 
time ever, perhaps, a publisher has 
put the operations into one finished 
product for inspection. He said the 
net effect will be a snow scene of 
the campus. 

Chapman, also a former 
Collegian photo editor, said the 
Index has changed some of its 
traditional format. "We've moved 



away from group photos... using 
candid photos and have spruded up 
the senior section." 

Chapman said there have been 
some computer problems. He said 
the Index felt responsible to list all 
the seniors whether they had a 
picture taken or not. They therefore 
requested a computer run- off but 
only pot the names through P. 

Chapman expects the Index to 
arrive by Fall registration, compared 
to Halloween for the '73 edition. He 
said the publishing cost of the 272- 
page yearbook was about $49,000. 

He has ordered 11,500 copies 
compared to 13,000 copies for the 
'73 edition. He explained that 
although some 17,000 students 
paid for the book, there were still 
3,000 copies of the '73 edition left 
over. 

He expects the press run will 
supply all interested persons with a 
copy and will result in a substantial 
dollar savings. 

Chapman said about 35 students 
were on this year's Index staff. 



The Bluewall cafeteria serves 
luncheon meals from 11:30 a.m. to 
2 p.m., Monday through Friday 
(closed Saturday and Sunday). The 
bar is open Monday through Friday, 
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 a.m., and on 
weekends, from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. 
Entertainment will be offered four 
nights each week (Wed., Thurs., 
Fri., and Sat.) from 9 p.m. until 
closing. 



In Next week's Solstice: A 
layman 's guide to Guru MaharaJ Ji 
- Who is he — What does he say. 




New Africa House plans festival 



Chapman 



Grad establishes scholarship fund 



A Class of 1911 Scholarship 
Endowment Fund has been 
established here through a gift from 
a member of that class. 

Mr. Edgar M. Brown of Sim- 
sbury, Conn., one of seven sur- 
viving members of the Class of 191 1 
of UMass, then called 
Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, began the fund for 
scholarships for needy students. 

Income for the fund will go 
toward scholarships to students 
who work to earh a matching 
amount. The fund will be ad- 
ministered by the UMass Foun- 
dation a non-profit corporation 



established to provide UMass 
financial support in areas where the 
State cannot. 

Mr. Brown, a long-time supporter 
of UMass, has had a career in 
landscape construction and general 
nursery work. He has also bought 
and restored Colonial estates and 
has built new homes with Colonial- 
style interiors. His public service 
activities include a 48-year 
membership in the Hartford 
Kiwanis Club, of which he is a past 
president, and membership in the 
Hartford area advisory group of the 
Salvation Army. 



The Black Cultural Center of New 
Africa House is sponsoring a huge 
Summer Festival Benefit in 
Amherst Town Commons, 
Saturday and Sunday, July 13 and 
14. The entire Amherst and 
surrounding communities are 
encouraged to prticipate. 

Events of the Festival will include 
an Auction, tag and bake sales, and 
crafts. We are asking everyone for 
donations of furniture and other 
household items. Pick up service 
will be arranged when you call 545- 
0794. All hobbyists, craftsmen and 
artists are invited to exhibit their 
wares. Anyone with anything to sell 
may participate in our Tag Sales. 
The festival will include concerts, 
drama, fashion and talent shows, 
and children's entertainment. 

The New Africa house 



desperately needs funds for 
establishing a Black Cultural Center 
Library and an Infant Care Center, 
and all proceeds of the Benefit will 
go toward these goals. 

For further information contact 
545-0794, MWF, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 



^The Paper House ^ 



McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte. 9) 
Hadiey, 584-2277 

CYCLE REPAIRS 
All Makes & Models 



Parts & Accessories 



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en 



c3 65 UNIVERSfTY DRIVE 



Closest Bike 
Shop to 
U. AAass 




People misunderstand 

Transcendental Meditation 
because: 

'1 .The« think it's a religion - T.M. is a very simple effortless, mechanical technique 
U *ISn't nee^sitete aVing any particular faith, belief or philosophy and yet it 

(2mev tS meditation mean, withdrawing from lite - Practicedi for .5-20 minutes 

wee a (teithTs technique is a preparation for dynamic activity. Over half a million 

pple-stadents businessmen, dSctors, artists, athletes...ga.n benefits daily from 

nfTt'^''thinTt'h'forganization is Commercial - IMS is a non-profit educatioral 

^Mory Presentation on Transcendental Meditation Wednesday. July 3rd, Mach- 
mer W-26. at 7 .30 p.m. 



^OOD 
CLOTHES.^ 
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Introductory Presentation on Transcendental Meditation 

Wednesday. July ird. Machmer W-26, at 7 :30 p.m. 

INFORMATION, CALL 549-6708 



• NEWand USED Clothing featuring the lowest prices 

in town 

•Used jeans, denim jackets, leather jackets, western 
shirts, much more . . . 

New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 

PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 

253-5291 

Open Monday Saturday, 10 6 
Friday Nite, till 9 



iU 



P«9« 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, June v, 1974 



Thursday, Jun* 27, 1»74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«9« 5 




Observers report that Metawampe did not drop his 
spear graduation day. That's what he'll do, rumor has 
it, when the first virgin is graduated from UAAass. 




tJifUAitUi/UjUJJi/U^UAJuUjUAljUbUAJ^^ 



FOR LIGHTNING FAST DELIVERY ON ANY OF OUR ■ 
DELICIOUS PIZZAS OR SUBS CALL THE HUNGRY-U. ■ 



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Vets to protest in D.C. again 



Vietnam Veterans Against the 
War-Winter Soldier Organization 
(VVAW-WSO), which came to 
Washington three years ago to 
protest American involvement in 
Indochina, is returning to the 
nation's capital July 1 - 4 to settle 
the unfinished business of the war. 

The organization, which has 
expanded to include non-veteran 
members, will be demonstrating for 
five demands growing out of the 
war and the continued US presence 
in Indochina. 

VVAW-WSO actions in 
Washington on July 1st through 
4th will focus on "Universal and 
Unconditional Amnesty for All War 
Resisters," "Implement the Peace 
Agreement — End All Aid to Thieu 
and Lon Nol," "Single-type 
Discharge for All Veterans," 
"Decent Benefits for All Veterans" 
and the removal of Nixon from 
office. 

VVAW-WSO members and 
supporters will assemble on the 
Mall on July 1st for registration and 
community outreach activities. 

Tuesday, July 2nd, at 10:00 a.m. 
VVAW-WSO will demonstrate for 
decent benefits for all veterans at 
the VA building. Activities will then 
move to Lafayette Park for a 
protest of Nixon's continued White 
House presence. 

VVAW-WSO views Nixon as one 
of the major obstacles to the 
achievement of these five demands 

Protest schedule 

June 27th — Actions on com- 
plaints against the VA in New York 
City and Buffalo, New York. 

July 2nd - 9:30 a.m. - March 
from Mall (4th & Madison NW) to 
VA national headquarters (800 
Vermont NW) 

10:00 a.m. — Demonstration 
for decent benefits for all veterans. 

10:45 a.m. - March from VA 
to Lafayette Park for Kick Nixon 
Out demonstration. 

1:30 p.m. - March from Mall 
to Court of Military Appeals (5th h 
E NW) — demonstration for single- 
type discharge for all veterans. 

J'lly 3rd - 10:00 a.m. - March 
from Mall to Justice Department — 
Demonstration for universal and 
unconditional amnesty for all war 
resisters. 

July 4th - 10:15 a.m. - March 
from Mall to Lincoln Memorial 
(assemble for mass march). 

11:30 a.m. — Mass march 
begins up Constitution Avenue. 

12:00 Noon - Rally begins at 
the Ellipse. 

1:30 p.m. — March from Mall 
to capitol Building (west steps) — 
demonstration for implementation 
of Paris Agreement and ending all 
aid to Thieu and Lon Nol. 



ana views his removal from office 
as the first step in eliminating the 
policies which originally led to 
American intervention in Indochina. 

Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. demon- 
strators will proceed to the Court of 
Military Appeals to demand a 
single-ty^e discharge for all 
veterans. VVAW-WSO believes 
that the use of the current multiple- 
classification discharge system and 
the inadequate and poorly ad- 
ministered benefits compound the 
problems facing veterans today. A 
less than honorable discharge can 
brand a veteran for life, severely 
limiting job opportunities and 
government benefits. 

Tuesday evening at George 
Washington University events will 
include a panel discussion of 
veterans' issues, appearance by five 
anti-war, former POWs (prisoners 
of war) guerilla theater and en- 
tertainment. 

The next morning, Wednesday, 
July 3rd, at 10:30 a.m., protestors 
will gather at the Justice Depart- 
ment to demand universal and 
unconditional amnesty for all war 
resisters. 

In raising the issue of Universal 
and Unconditional Amnesty, 
VVAW-WSO hopes to bring the 
war and its continuing impact home 
to the American people. The 
organization is demanding amnesty 
for the over 1,000,000 Vietnam-era 



resisters. The key point of ths 
demand is that of those in need of 
amnesty, more than 500,000 are 
veterans with less than honorable 
discharges. 

Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 
p.m., the Capitol steps will be the 
site of a demonstration urging the 
implementation of the Paris Peace 
Accords and the end of all US aid 
to Thieu and Lon Nol. VVAW-WSO 
believes adherence to the 1973 
Agreement is the most viable 
solution to the continuing war in 
Indochina and protests that during 
the past year the US has provided 
more than $2 billion in aid to South 
Vietnamese President Thieu and 
Cambodian President Lon Nol, 
much of it in direct violation of the 
Peace Accords. 

Indoor activities at George 
Washington University Wednesday 
night will include further panel 
discussion on the demonstration's 
demands and appearance by Gary 
Lawton, the black community 
leader now facing a third trial in 
Riverside, California, after two 
hung juries rejected the 
prosecution's murder allegations. 

On July 4th, activities will 
culminate with a mass march from 
the Lincoln Memorial to a noon rally 
on the Ellipse in support of all five 
VVAW-WSO demands. ^" 




JL 



SUMMER 



Fast & Courteous Delivery 



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from $23.50 $42.50 
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Cambridge, Mass 02138 
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us Patent No 3305947 



Amherst Hours: 
10 5:30, Mon. Sat. 



11-7 p.m., Frj. 



Daniels: So happy I said praise tfie Lord 



BYMARKVOGLER 

He could hardly wait to get out of 
Norfolk Prison and return to 
Belchertown State School, a place 
he knew as home for 13 years. 

But even though he is glad to be 
back — for the time being — 
Russell Daniels lives in limbo and 
awaits another chance in the "real 
world." 

The 29-year-old mentally 
retarded man is a convicted 
criminal who has only been semi- 
vindicated. 

For nearly two years after his 
release from the state school in 
1970, Daniels was apparently 
functioning normally in society. He 
had his own apartment and was 
employed as a janitor. 

Daniels was branded on August 
22, 1972 when the Springfield 
Police charged him with the murder 
of 83-year-old Mrs. Klara Haas, a 
tenant in a local apartment complex 
where he worked. 

Five months later he began a life 
sentence at Walpole State prison 
after a signed murder confession 
was produced as the major 
evidence against him in the trial. 

Today Daniels credits his 
freedom to a group of University of 
Massachusetts students and "the 
good Lord." 

The students came to his rescue 
this spring under the guidance of 
UMass professor Benjamin Ricci, 
charging that Daniels' rights had 
been denied while asking Gov. 
Francis W. Sargent to check into 
the nr>atter. 

Last week's unprecedented 
transfer was the culmination of 
several months of intense pressure 
on the Governor's office by the 
group. 



Daniels returned to Belchertown 
June 10 in accordance with an 
unusual legal statute exercised by 
Gov. Sargent which enables the 
Department of Mental Health to 
assume responsibility from the 
Department of Corrections. 

"They really did a good job...- 
those students... they got me out of 
Norfolk and I want to thank them," 
Daniels said in a recent interview. 

"When I walked out of that front 
door (Norfolk), I was so happy I 
said praise the Lord... A lot of 
people told me not to worry.. .'you'll 
be outa here... just pray hard and 
you'll be out.'. ..and that's what I've 
been doing ever since." 

Daniels hopes again to go back 
into the "real world", pending the 
outcome of an appeal in September 
before the state's Supreme Judicial 
Court. 

His attornies, Arthur J. Hickerson 
of Springfield and Beryl Cohen of 
Brookline are contending that 
Daniels' constitutional rights were 
denied by the Springfield Police 
Department. 

After an April 20 meeting with 
Ricci and the UMass students 
Sargent conceded the confession 
was "Illegally attained" while 
acknowledging failure on his ad- 
ministration's part for not providing 
adequate human services for the 
resident. 

"I'm leaving.. .as soon as it's all 
taken care of (the appeal). ..I'm 
going back home where I belong," 
Daniels said. 

"I'll stay here just for the time 
being.. .I'd like to be out again. ..I 
really don't belong here." 

Hampden County District At- 
torney Mathew J. Ryan has strong 



Freed 



(Continued 

everybody else." 

Jones added Daniels "is 
capable" of resuming a normal life 
now, but said the likelihood 
depends upon the appeal outcome. 

"As long as Russell stands 
convicted, he's got a heavy rap 
which complicates the issue of how 
much society can accomodate 
him," he said. 

"But until there is a clarification 
of the conviction, we shouldn't 
confuse the fact that he made some 
major accomplishments as a human 
being — and he did not need 
Belchertown up until the time he 
was arrested." 

Regardless of the appeal out- 
Qome, Daniels can remain a 
resident of the institution and could 
eventually be transfered to a 
commi"""*" 'e»'''^once. 



from P. 1) . 

Jones said that because of 
student involvement in the Daniels 
case, the unusual legal statute 
came to light which could open up 
a better relationship between the 
Corrections and Mental Health 
Departments to improve the 
situations of other prison inmates in 
the state. 

According to former state 
Corrections Commissioner John 
Bocne, over 25 per cent of those 
celled in the state's prisons are 
mentally retarded. 

One of the UMass students has 
already initiated a research project 
to conduct an inventory of 
Massachusetts prisons to deter- 
mine how many should be treated 
for mental problems instead of 
criminal offenses. 




\ on a bun- 






reservations about Daniels' transfer 
and possible release into the 
community. 

Ryan, who prosecuted the case 
against Daniels, said he hoped that 
the Governor "hasn't succumbed 
to pressure." 

"If they are talking about putting 
this man on the street again, then I 
think that some citizens may be 
overly concerned of this matter, 
and I hope that it isn't something 
that may come back and haunt the 
Governor," he said. 

"Afterall, this man has been 
found guilty of murder. I hope for 
the sake of all that it isn't a question 
of political pressure, but rather in 
the best interests of everyone." 

Daniels now asks "What will 
happen to the police and Mattie 
Ryan?" 

"Something should be done 
about it.. .when I saw it on TV 
(WTIC documentary on 

Daniels)... when he was on there, he 
was trying to blame the Belcher- 
town people... 'who let this guy 
outa there and let'm into the 
community?' 

"They're trying to blame the 
Belchertown people... but I think 
they oughta be taken off the job or 
something." 

Belchertown State School Supt. 
William Jones siad he felt Daniels 
"is capable" of resuming a normal 
life, but added the likelihood 
depends upon the appeal outcome. 

"As long as Russell stands 
convicted, he's got a heavy rap 
which complicates the issue of how 
much society can accomodate 
him," he said. 

"But until there Is a clarification 
of the conviction, we shouldn't 
confuse the fact that he made some 
major accomplishments as a human 
being — and he did not need 
Belchertown up until the time he 
was arrested." 

According to Jones, Daniels will 
be entitled to "full grounds 
priviledges" and will be treated 
"just like everybody else" while 
under the superintendent's 
authority at the state school. 

Regardless of the appeal out- 
come, Daniels can remain a 
resident of Belchertown and could 
eventually be transfered to a 
community residence. 



Looking back on his days in 
prison, Daniels notes the liberties 
denied him — "things" that he 
could otherwise do at Belchertown 
or in society. 

"There's all these rules.. .the 
whistle blows at quarter past eight 
at night... if you stay out late, they 
lock you up. ..you gotta have a time 
pass... you can only wear certain 
kinds of clothes," he recalled. 

"Here (at Belchertown) you can 
do a lot more walking around than 
at Norfolk.. .there's more 
freedom. ..But back home 
(Springfield), it's better, the only 
rules you have is the law. 

"I'm gonna start working when I 
get out... kitchen work. I want to be 
a chef... I can watch tv...raide my 
bike... I can't drive a car, but am 
studying a book now that tells you 
how." 

In each of the three worlds of 



Russell Daniels, "work" was one ot 
life's pleasures that could not be 
deprived. 

"At Walpole, I wanted to go to 
work right away. But the innnates 
there were on strike... and they told 
me not to do anything," he said. 

"When I was arrested I wanted 
to get a job at Howard Johnson's... I 
want to start back working." 

Daniels portrays his prison ex- 
perience as an ordeal that he often 
thought might never end. 

While he waits out the appeal, 
priviledges at the institution seem 
fewer to Russell Daniels than in the 
independent life he led two years 
ago — but the surroundings at 
Belchertown are more appealing 
than the iron bars he knew at 
Walpole and Norfolk prisons. 



Thv 



Rusty Nail Inn 



|)i rsriils 



lOMii: -sl^I)\^ \m 



Clean Living 



\| \1 n i:SI)\\ \ WI.DNKSDX'S MIK 

Real Tears 



.11 I V Kh 

John Lee Hooker 



Kir. 17. Siiixlrrliiml ()(t?>- \^):\~ 

lake Htp. 1 Ki north, take left after Tennis \eadein> and 
folloH to end. lake another left, 200 yards and \ou're 
there: : 




p««t « 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P»9e 7 




Attorney for Students 

Many seek Howland's spot 



Student government represen- 
tatives said this week they expect 
to select the new attorney for 
students by Aug. 5. 
IRichard Howland, the former 
students' attorney, resigned May 19 
after the Student Government's 
Executive Committee recom- 
mended his contract not be 
renewed next year. 

Paul Hamel, senate treasurer and 
the acting speaker, said the search 
committee has already received 20 
resumes by "word of mouth" and 
expects to receive about 200 



resumes once the position is ad- 
vertised in various publications. 

Hamel said the committee will 
decide what type of service they 
will want from the attorney but that 
full time 'egal counseling on a 24- 
hour basis and litigation (court 
representation) are high on the list. 

He said there is a possibility the 
committee will want to hire two 
lawyers. Hamel said the starting 
salary is negotiable but will 
probably be between $12,000 and 
$16,000. 

He said the search committee 



has also received a few proposals 
from law firms offering "a package 
type of deal." 

"That's a very interesting concept 
and we're willing to explore it 
fully." 

"We offer a fairly good job with a 
good salary," the senate treasurer 
said. "We provide the office space, 
secretary, and are willing to buy law 
books." 

Students, he said, who need legal 
advice may call legal services and 
they will be referred to "competent 
legal advice." 



Paul Hamel 



Photo by Dave Less 



Smith selects first woman pres 



Jill K. Conway will become Smith 
College's first woman president one 
year from Monday, July 1, the 
Board of Trustees recently an- 
nounced. 

Ms. Conway, presently the vice 
president of internal affairs at the 
University of Toronto, will succeed 
Thomas C. Mendenhal who will 
have served as the prestigous 
college's president for 16 years. 

Born in Hillston, N.S.W., 
Australia, in 1934, Mrs. Conway 
won the University Medal when she 
was graduated from the University 
of Sydney in 1958. She received a 
Ph.D. from Harvard University and 
has taught American history at the 
University of Toronto since 1964. 

Mrs. Conway is a distinguished 
lecturer and participant in scholarly 
conferences. She is the author of 
many articles and publications, 
among which are several for 
Daedalus, including "Jane Ad- 
dams, an American Heroine" 
(Spring, 1964) and "Intellectuals in 
America: Varieties of Ac- 
commodation and Conflict" 
(Summer, 1972). 



me subject of her dissertation 
was "Women Reformers and 
American Culture, 1870-1930." She 
is currently at work on a project 
with Natalie Zemon Davis (Smith 
'49) of the University of California, 
Berkeley, to produce a bibliography 
on sources relating to the history of 



women and the family in Europe 
and North America. 

In her position, Mrs. Conway will 
head the largest privately endowed 
liberal arts college for women in the 
United States, with an un- 
dergraduate enrollment of 2,5(X) 
students. 



XEROX BULK RATE 

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offering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the follow 
ing conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each original 
(b) $5.00 minimum (c) loose leaf originals only (d) 
allow 24 hours. Orders meeting these conditions will 
be Xeroxed for two cents per copy. Collating and 
choice of regular, three-hole, legal, or colored paper 
are free. 25% rag paper is V2 cent extra. Gnomon 
has copy centers in Harvard and Central squares, 
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Deerfield summer series begins 



A quick glance 



Emily Dickinson and the Un- 
derground Railroad are among the 
topics of a UMass lecture- 
discussion series that begins today. 

Presented by the Summer Arts 
Committee of the Student Ac- 
tivities Office, the informal talks are 
open to the public without charge. 
All will be Thursday at 3 p.m. in the 
Colonial Lounge of the Student 
Union. 

The series is a Bicentennial 
prelude, focusing on a group of 
areas important in American history 
and with a connection in the 
Pioneer Valley. The first talk, 
Thursday, June 27, will be by 



Katherine Emerson, arcnivist at the 
University Library. 

She will talk on Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, one of the 
focal points for social and 
educational development, and will 
discuss some of the important 
papers that are in possession of the 
University and available for 
research. Ms. Emerson will also 
trace the University's development. 

Historic Deerfield, significant in 
the formation of New England 
society, will be the topic of the July 
11 talk. Peter Spang of Old Historic 
Deerfield Inc., will be the speaker. 
On July 18, Dr. Fred Turner, ' 



UMass English professor and 
folklorist, will talk on Lord Jeffrey 
Amherst, the old account of the 
smallpox-infected blankets given to 
the Indians, and the influence and 
presence of Indians in the area. 

Polly Longsworth, a writer and 
Emily Dickinson scholar, will talk on 
the life and work of the famed 
Amherst poet on July 25. On Aug. 
1, Sidney Kaplan, UMass English 
professor and black history scholar, 
will talk on the Underground 
Railroad and how abolitionists from 
this area helped escaped slaves on 
their way to Canada. 



The UMass Summer Film Program will be presenting "The Good. 
The Bad, and the Ugly " with Clint Eastwood on June 25, The 
Graduate on July 2, Easy Rider on July 9, The Lion has Seven Heads 
on July 16. Dodes Da Ken on July 23 and Klute August 6 with Jane 
Fonda. The shows start at 8 p.m. in the Campus Center Auditorium. 
All shows are free except Dodes KaKen which costs a quarter. 

The first of six classical music concerts of the New England 
Musical Festival will open on June 30 at 8:15 in Buckley Hall at 
Amherst College. This will be the first of six Sunday concerts. 

Mount Holyoke College's Summer theater will be putting on a 
series of plays throughout the summer including "Story Theater" 
July 2-6, "Jaques Brels is alive and living in Paris. July 16-20, "The 
Rainmaker " July 23-27, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff?" July 30- 
AugustS, the Playboy of the Western World" August 6-10, "Lovers 
and Other Strangers" August 6-10, and "The Taming of the 
Shrew ". All shows begin at 8:30 p.m. except "Story Theater" which 
begins at 10:30 a.m. 



\ 



Professor studying elm disease 



Dr. Dilbagh Singh, professor of 
biology at Blackburn College in 
Carlinville, llln., will take a sab- 
batical leave in the form of three 
summers (this one, 1975 and 1976) 
at the Shade Tree Laboratories 
here conducting research on Dutch 
elm disease with Dr. Francis W. 
Holmes, director of the 

laboratories. 

His study is particularly ap- 
propriate to the Amherst area since 
the Shade Tree Laboratories have 
been engaged in researching both 
salt injury to trees and resistance 
vs. susceptibility to the Dutch elm 
disease for the past three decades. 
In 1969 and 1970 Dr. Singh studied 
another wilt disease (Verticillium 
wilt of cotton) at Oklahoma State 



University, supported by a grant 
from the National Science 
Foundation. Verticillium wilt 
(especially in maple and elm) is also 
studied a» the Shade Tree 
Laboratories, where the first world 
records of Verticillium wilt of 
dogwood and honeysuckle were 
discovered. 

Dr. Singh received his doctorate 
in 1967 at the University of 
Wisconsin, his dissertation written 
on the various nitrogenous 
compounds in the sap of healthy 
and Dutch elm diseased elm trees. 
Since then he has been engaged 
principally in teaching at Blackburn 
College. His research efforts have 
yielded a technique to imitate 
drought conditions for plants 



grown hydroponically (in liquid 
nutrients) by altering the levels of 
salt in the solutions. He plans to 
study the effects of these dif- 
ferences upon susceptibility or 
resistance of American elms to 
Dutch elm disease. 



Computer 
Gramnnar 



There's more 
to a bicycle 

than the name 
on the frame. 



Campus Carousel 



BY TONY GRANITE 
YEARBOOK IS FOR BURNING at 
Purdue U., if one student has his 
say. For when the latest Debris 
appeared, this Spring, the hammer 
and sickle emblem appearing on its 
cover raised the hackles on Rex 
Stoval. He wrote the student body 
President that "The emblem is too 
close to the communist sym- 
bole...(v/hich) is completely op- 
posite to our way of government 
and personal freedom." 

He suggested a nnass burning of 
the yearbook, 77je Purdue Ex- 
ponent reports. 

IMPEACHMENl succeeded at 
Texas Southern U., this spring, 
when the student body leader was 
ousted by 73.4 percent vote of the 
Student Senate. He had been cited 
for apathy and failure to recognize a 
constitution approved by the 
Senate. A story in the TSU Herald 
said so. 

FORTUNE COOKIES were used by 
the housing office at Stanford U. in 
the annual drawing for room 
assignments by 5,000 students. 
While it took the dull out of the 



Top of the Campus 
presents 



draw, it left the campus with 5,000 
crumbled cookies to dispose of, 
according to a page one piece in 
The Stanford Observer. 

HOW TO COLLECT DEBTS? 
ADVERTISE. That's what the 
yearbook, La Cumbre, has done at 
UCal-Santa Barbara. In a full page 
ad in the Daily Nexus, announcing a 
distribution party for the 1974 
edition, the editors listed the names 
of 38 subscribers who "still owe 
money" on the yearbook. The 
deadline of June 4 to pay up was 
the eve of general distribution of 
the book on the 5th. 

And where was all this to take 
place? In the Storke building, that's 
where. 

WHAT A NICE THING FOR AN 
ADMINISTRATION TO DO! The 
personnel department of the 
University of Minnesota paid for a 4 
col. by 7-inch ad in the Minnesota 
Daily, to offer "3,000 thank you's" 
to the 3,000 clerical-secretarial 
employees on the campus. The ad 
noted it was National Secretaries 
Week. 



With the bang of a high speed 
impact printer, the teaching of 
English grammar was shoved into 
the computer age last Monday 
night in room 227 of Herter Hall. 

When the CLEP English program 
tapes (nicknamed "Osmosis") were 
rewound, printouts were ready to 
be passed back to students who 
had scores ranging from 250 to 500 
for a segment of a practice CLEP 
exam. 

The course, called "A Review for 
the CLEP English Exam: A Com- 
puter Assisted Workshop", is set 
up as a review of grammar for the 
non-English major who by later 
taking the CLEP exam (ad- 
ministered by the Testing Office) 
may earn up to 6 credits in English 
and thus bypass his frosh Rhetoric 
requirement. 




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Page • 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Paget 



Editorials 




Reviews 




Double standards in media lEngaging Album | 



BY SHERWOOD THOMPSON 
[BNS] 

Up to date, it has been recognized that the media 
giants of newspaper, radio, and television 
organizations, have been operating in a manner as if 
Black people did not exist, nor have these monopoly 
communication corporations treated Black audiences 
fairly in reporting news, events, and activities that 
involve Black communities. 

The question of double standards in the media was 
detected from the Kerner Commission Report. The 
commission revealed that "The media reports and 
writes from the standpoint of a white man's 
world.. .the white press... repeatedly, if unconsiously, 
reflects the bias, the paternalism, and the indifference 
of white America." Therefore, the true reflections and 
accurate accounts of the Black experience in North 
America became diluted, and played down, while 
other interest concerning Pan-African people 
elsewhere in the world was totally omitted, or 
completely distorted. 

Who owns and runs thes') giant media 
organizations? 

According to information received from the 
FoufKlation For Change, out of approximately 1748 
daily newspapers, and 7610 weekly newspapers in the 
United States, only approximately 177 are Black 
owned. Nevertheless, the Black population make-up 
in the country is well over 30 percent of the total 
population, although only 1 percent of the newspaper 
owners are Black. 

Observations further indicate that out of 7069 radio 
stations owned in the nation, only 350 stress "soul" or 
Black programming. Remember, there are 7069 radio 
stations approximately in operation in this country, 
and only 12 of these stations (less than 1 percent) are 
Black owned and operated. Out of the 12 owned by 
Blacks, 3 are privately owned by a single owner 
(singer-entertainer Jame« firnKAin\ 



As alarming as these figures may sound, there still 
exist a more surprising, but expected, unequal 
distribution and ownership of media control 
organizations. Of approximately 892 TV stations 
nationwide, not a single one is Black owned and 
managed. This is certainly an outrage considering that 
out of the top level decision makers in the 3 major 
networks, CBS, NBC, and ABC, there is a less than 1 
percent lower level managers who are Black. Also 
remember, that over 80 percent of the Black people in 
this country have television sets and-or dependent on 
their minimum use, for program news, in- 
formation, and entertainment. 

When information like the above is circulated, it can 
be clearly seen as reported by the Kerner Commission 
that "The communications media have failed to 
communicate any sense of Black culture, thought, or 
history." With the management and ownership being 
95 percent controlled by white media organizations, it 
has become obvious that the voice of the media 
communication services is spoken by alien, 
unrepresentative, and bias mediator. It has been 
traditionally to bevel the Black experience leaving 
many important members of the Black community 
unheard of and voiceless. 

, In view of these face slapping reality, concerning 
Black people's involvement in communications, it has 
been determined by responsible Black media 
organizations, that in order to save the Black nation, 
and for the promotion of serious, honest, newsworthy 
accounts of the Black experience, it is imperative that 
Black people become owners and managers of their 
own systems of communication. It was further 
determined that a people who control their media — 
control their mind — control their communities, 
control their destiny. 



Against the weed 



Until last week I had what tokers 
call "a good attitude." I didn't 
smoke myself but raised no ob- 
jections to my friends who did. 
After all, the medical profession 
had found no more serious ob- 
jections with marijuana than 
alcohol. 

But that was until one night last 
week when I saw a group of junior 
high boys gathered in a suspicious 
looking circle. They were smoking 
grass.. ..and that distressed me. 

I asked one of the guys if he 
smoked much. Me said yes. I then 
asked him if most high school 
students he knew had, or do, 
smoke grass. Again, he answered 
yes. 

It's not because I celebrated my 
25th birthday yesterday and am 



starting to feel older, but when a 
drug reaches youth I am bothered. I 
don't think it's healthy to raise a 
generation on any drug: alcohol, 
marijuana, depressants, or uppers. 

I have seen what marijuana does 
to people. It mellows them. They 
lose their drive. Friends of mine 
who were ambitious and athletic 
are now more concerned with their 
grass supply. 

And now it's predominant in high 
schools, junior high and probably 
grammar school too. 

I recall what a friend of mine 
teaching high school said to me 
recently: "These kids aren't willing 
to go out and create their interests. 
They sit back and let some grass go 
to work on them." 

Sooner or later marijuana 



there is no 
They'll wake 



smokers will realize 

purpose in smoking. 

up one day and wonder where the 

constant high is leading them. 

And that's the day they will grow 
up. I hope my children make it. 

MIKEKNEELAND 



BYMIKEKOSTEK 
Arlo Guthrie Arlo Guthrie 
(Reprise MS 2183) time 31:08 

This one goes down easier than 
any Arlo album since Running 
Down The Road, and seems to 
stand up well enough to be 
unofficially crowned as Arlo Best. 

The ingredients that go into 
making Arlo Guthrie such an 
engaging album are variety and 
decent songs with often fine lyrics, 
but most of all, Arlo seems to have 
come into the studios with an 
album's worth of ideas, and 
producers John Pilla and Lenny 
Waronker have had the insight to 
carry things off just right. Their 
economy of vision has made this 
record short at 31:08, but long in 
replay potential. 

"Presidential Rag" is a solid, 
undeii/tated argument of a song 
that puts Nixon's actions up to 
Nixonian logical analysis, while 
"Children Of Abraham" demon- 
strate's Guthrie's developing vocal 
technique. More than ever, he 
knows what he can and can't sing, 
and he restricts himself thusly. 
"Children", a plea for humanity and 
sanity in the Mid-East, is carried off 
by a charging female chorus, who 
give the song the needed range of 
emotion Arlo can never deliver 
alone. 

Nick De Caro has orchestrated 
some intelligent and engaging 
back-up strings that certainly add a 
lot. 

(Secret clue for Massachusetts 
fans: Arlo lives in Stockbridge, and 
mentions Massachusetts on this 
album; thus you can buy this and 
feel at home.) 



Arlo Guthrie is growing, ana this 
algum won't clunk on your turn- 
table in a few years like so many of 
his others now do. So for fans, and 
hefty enough to command respect 
from non-believers. Net Worth: 
!2.50. 

MULESK/NNER-M\JLESK\UHEH 
(Warners BS 2787) time 34:26 

Notes of introductory ex- 
planation: This 'Potpourri of 
bluegrass jam' consists of ex-Earth 
Opera-Seatrainer-Old And In The 
Way-er Peter Rowan, ex-Byrd 
Clarence White, studio prac- 
titioners David Grisman and Bill 
Keith, and all led by ex-various jobs, 
but most notably Seatrain violinist 
Richard Greene. They got together 
for some studio times, and 
produced an enjoyable, if shallow, 
disc. 

The main problem with this is 
with, alas, the 'Bluegrass' they spin 
off for about half the album. Except 
for Greene, who is extraordinary, 
and Clarence White (these were his 
last sessions before he was hit and 
killed by a car) on his inalterably 
tasteful guitar, there really isn't 
enough going on to justify listening 
to this Bluegrass rather than, say, 
Country Gazette, The Earl Scruggs 
Revue or the Nashville originators. 
So what this comes down to is a 
novelty item with country in- 
terludes. These 'Novelties' are 
mostly small though supple ex- 
tensions of traditional Bluegrass 
("Opus 57 in G Minor", "Runways 
Of The Moon") that give Greene a 
chance to shine. Most of his in- 
teresting technique consists of 
shimmering runs of notes that glide 
and sparkle out of both speakers. 
A gentleman's .'1.50. 



Back in town 



Protest N.C. racisnn 



In Greenville, North Carolina, in 
1972, a white youth and a young 
Black man were charged with 
raping a white woman. Both 
defendents denied the charges. 
They were given separate trials. 
The white boy was freed, the Black 
sent to prison for life. 

In Oxford, North Carolina, Dr. 
Jim Grant, one of the most well 
known and dynamic leaders of the 
North Carolina Black youth 
movement, was sentenced to 10 
years for conspiracy to aid two men 
with criminal records to flee from 
prosecution. The charges against 
the two escapees were dropped 
after thy testified against Grant. 
This spring it was discovered by the 
Charlotte Observer tha^ the in- 
formers had been paid thousands 
of dollars for their testimony by the 
U.S. Justice Dept. under John 
Mitchell. Dr. Jim Grant is currently 
serving his time. 

These are just some of the many 
cases that give North Carolina 
proportionally more political 
prisoners than any other state. 
Other cases include 50 Tuscarora 
Indians, the Charlotte Three, and 
the Wilmington Ten. 

On July 4th, in the spirit of self- 
determination that characterized 
our first Independence Day, 
thousands of people from all over 



the country will oe marcning in 
Raleigh, North Carolina to insist 
that all political prisoners be freed. 
It is expected to be the largest civil 
rights demonstration in the South 
since the killing of Martin Luther 
King. Present and speaking at the 
March will be Angela Davis, 
Reverend Ben Chavis, Clyde 
Bellacourt of the American Indian 
Movement and musicians Roberta 
Flack and Stevie Wonder. 

The organizers of the march are 
the North Carolina branch of the 
National Alliance Against Racist 
and Political Repression, a broad 
based coalition of student, church, 
community, and labor groups of 
varied political beliefs who are 
dedicated to stopping the growing 
repression against people active in 
movements for peace and justice. 
The National Alliance also works 
for fundamental changes in the 
prison system. As a national 
organization they have chosen this 
year to focus their attention 
especially on the situation in North 
Carolina. Some background about 
the state should explain why. 

North Carolina has the largest 
and worst prison system in the 
country with the largest death row. 
In fact, 40 percent or U.S. prisoners 
sentenced to death are incarcerated 
in North Carolina, Outside of the 



B Y ZAMIR NES TLEBA UM 

George Bernard Shaw once asked a female 
companion whether she would go to bed for him for 
two million dollars. "Yes, I suppose I would," she 
replied pondering for a moment. "Would you then go 
to bed with me for two dollars?" Shaw quickly 
retorted. "Certainly not," came the angry response. 
"What do you take me for, a prostitute?" To which 
grandiose opening Shaw replied "We've already 
established that! Now we're just quibbling about the 
price!" 

In similar circumstances to Shaw's prim and proper 
lady do we find ourselves in at the moment. The 
simple fact that the end of the spring semester was 
not enough to enlighten us of the folly, but that we 
once again, in the summer months no less,find 
ourselves buried in the catacombs of Academia. IN 
SCHOOL! My god, haven't we had enough, that we 
should return, so eagerly for more torture like buf- 
faloes running off a cliff. It's already been an 
established fact, that we are indeed insane, but the 
extent of the brain damage had heretofore been 
unknown. Thank God for the Bluewall and its fine 
medicines. 

, But there are those now present in the community 
who aren't sure of their station or who are touristing it 
up. Walking here and there pointing at different 
buildings and arching their necks and straining their 
eyes to count the number of waffles in the Campus 
Center, or the number of windows in the first 
Graduate Research tower. Poor people. 

One such hapless wanderer stumbled into my path 
yesterday morning near the Campus Pond. "Excuse 
me sir," she said, "could you direct me to the 
Bluewall? I've heard so much about it and I want to 



see if it's all true!" 

"That depends on what you're looking for when 
you go there," I diplomatically replied. 

"Well I'm just a young and innocent freshman here 
for orientation and I'm ready for anything and I heard 
that I might find it in the Bluewall. Oh please Sirl Tell 
me where it is so that I may pursue my college ex- 
perience to the fullest. After all, thaf s what they tell 
us at summer counselingi" 

"That's the most ridiculous thing I ever heardi First 
of all the 'Wall' as it is affectionately called by 'those 
in the know' is closed at this goddam early hour. 
Second of all, even if it were open, do you think I 
would let you stray in there and fall prey to the lechers 
and perverts who moon around in there. Heck no!" 

"But Sirl" 

"No Buts! If it's fun you want, then come with 
-ne!" 



Later, in another part of town: 

Another bleary- eyed sort solicited me near the great 
tower of Babel (University Library). 

"Excuse pleasel Would you like to donate a few 
rubies or even legal tender to the Guru. As a sort of 
honeymoon present.. .you know he just got married." 

"Yes I know. Married at sixteen. It's an incredible 
fear but I guess nothing is too amazing for God. God 
should be able to get it at any age. Married his 
secretary, too. Yuk! YukI" 

"It's a solemn matter, one deserving of the utmost 
of regard, and not of a disrespectful banter, which you 
are exhibiting. Once again, man, you got any spare 
change?" 

"Do you have change for a three dollar bill?" 
Holy Kalamazoo Batman!! I think he means it! 



prisons the state has the worst 
labor repression and the lowest 
amount of unionized workers in the 
nation. There is a rising rate of 
white vigilante terrorism and police 
brutality that make a mockery of 
the picture many have of the "New 
South". While Sam Ervin, who is 
viewed as a progressive Southern 



Senator, heads up the Watergate 
Committee, his state continues to 
privide the most inadequate health 
and welfare services for its people 
and the lowest wages. Millions of 
dollars have instead been spent on 
the new Federal Behavior 
Modification Center in Butner 
where "maladjusted" prisoners. 



oven^/helmingly Black and Indian. 
Officials in North Carolina have 
also admitted to ordering the 
sterilization of hundreds of poor, 
young and Black women they 
deemed "mentally defective", 
while in the Senate Sam Ervin was 
voting against the Equal Rights 
Amendment 



Notes from the Undergrad 



The Metamorphosis; Apologies to Franz Kafka 



BYE. PA TRICK MCQUAID 

As Edward M. awoke one 
morning from uneasy dreams he 
found himself transformed in his 
bed into a gigantic student. He 
slowly rose from his mattress and 
stepped to the helf- length mirror 
attached to the nearby wall. He 
stared in astonishment. 

--How could this have hapF>ened 
to me?-he thought. In the course 
of one night he had grown the 
longest beard in his family's history. 
His hair, although always within 
style, was now of length beyond his 
own recognition; and a strange 
scent of opium weeds hung about 
his clothes and body. 

His focus of attention then 
turned from his own appearnace to 
that of the surroundings. Could this 
be the same room in which a short 
six hours ago he had laid down 
upon his mattress to rest? He 
quickly scanned the littered 
apartment. The desk upon which 
usually lied his brief case, ac- 
countant's loge, and two-toned pen 
set neatly arranged was now 
scattered with crinkled papers, 
discarded cigarette ends, over- 
turned beer bottles, and several 
periodicals that he would have been 
ashamed to be caught dead with. 

He picked up a half-shreded 
newspaper entitled ""Collegian". 

Black News Service 

In Amherst, the voice of the Pan- 
African community is the Black 
News Service (BNS). The Black 
News Service organization is a 
student run media training and 
placement project, working 
collectively with various media 
groups around campus. It functions 
concerns the training and 
placement of news reporters, radio- 
television programming, engineers, 
and technicians. The Black News 
Service will assign work projects to 
persons interested in assisting with 
suitable student service 
organizations. Groups such as the 
Collegian newspaper, WMUA radio 
station, have previously been 
serviced by members of the Black 
News Service staff. 

The Black News Service provides 
an additional service, which is 
preparing, and sending out articles, 
special coverages, documentary 
features, and news releases to 
various campus media groups. 

The Black News Service invites 
all interested persons to come by 
and inquire about the functions and 
services which are provided to the 
campus community. Information 
pertaining to how people may 
become involved with BNS, can be 
gathered at New Africa House, 
Cultural Center Office. 

Northampton V.W. 
As Is Spsehls 



1968 CHEV. Bel Air, 

^ «*»■ »395 


1967 CHEV. IM- 
PALA, V-8, auto 

*345 

1966 DODGE Polara 

»295 


1965 FORD Galaxy 

495 


1964 LINCOLN 
Continental ^395 



Northampton 



V.W. 



246 King Street, 
Northampton 
584-8620 
Open till 9every nite 
Saturdays till 5 




Flipping through the pages of 
liberal garbage he thrust it back 
among the other papyrus. 

-What a filthy rag-he thought. 
Surely I didn"t buy this! Pushing the 
long strands of hair from his view 
he kicked his way to the window 
and drew the curtains aside. The 
sunlight blinded him as it first 
slashed his weak eyes. He rubbed 
them fiercely. They were red and 
watery but not hurting. 

As he looked out into his yard he 
had a deep craving for nourish- 
ment. Strange, the term "mun- 
chies" was stuck obstrusively in his 
mind. 

The telephone rang and he 
answered it as usual.— No, he had 
not ordered a pizza, but it struck 
him as a fine suggestion. 
Mushrooms- how repulsive at this 
hour--yes, he would have 
mushrooms, and the peppers also- 
no, nothing to drink, thank you, -he 
had plenty of Bud in the 
refrigerator. 

He gave the address and found 
that he could not possibly have 
delivered. He did not live on 
campus. The campus-what could 
that be? There was no campus 
where he lived. 

After stepping foot from his 
grounds he discovered the neigh- 
bors were sneering at him. 
Someone made reference to him 



applying an adjective followed by 
the title of "hippie". He felt ex- 
tremely alienated. 

He decided to stop at his neigh- 
bor's home and take a drink from 
his outside tap, as he did quite 
often enroute to work in the hot 
mornings. 

"Get outta there, you (adjective 
deleted) pervert. You students are 
all alike!" He was requested, quite 
rudely that he might be in need of a 
hair cut. When he replied that he 
was well aware of that he was 
pelted with stones from the garden. 
Undoubtably he was not 
recognized as the respectful 
member of the community he was 
known to be. 

Once upon the road by some 
force of innate habit his hand 
extended across the pavement and 
his thumb rose straight up. He 
stared at it quite perplexed. 

-What can I be doing? I've never 
done this before. I always wait for 
the 8:44 bus. Before he could 
collect his thoughts a car full of 
what appeared to be construction 
men passed and threw out a 
disgusting remark along with 
someone's unwanted potato salad 
for lunch. 

He was brushing it off when a 
police cruiser pulled up aside him. 
He would no press charges, he 
tought as the officer stepped from 



the car. 

-I imagine you saw everything, 
officer, it's quite all right... 

-Up against the car, son. Let's 
have it; got anything on ya? 

-What could he mean, anything? 
Why, what are you... 

-OK, buddy, up against the car. 
Let's go! 

Much to his displeasure he was 
suddenly crucified across the hood 
of the state vehicle. What ebsued 
was a most embarassing search in 
which the policeman ran his fingers 
along every seam in his pants. He 
appeared to enjoy his work 
tremendously. 

-This one's clean, Harry. Keep it 
that way punk, ya hear? 

-I, I, why yes, sir. I certainly shall. 
Filthy pig, he thought to himself. 



The car rocketed away in the 
guise of important, official business 
leaving a shower of sand and dirt in 
Ms face. He began to brush 
himself off when a Volkswagon bus 
came to a hault along side of him. 
He looked on with dubious 
caution. The passenger swung 
open and a bearded, sunglassed 
face appeared with a faint smile. 
One of them handed him the 
bottle and informaly intrduced 
himself. He reutrned his name to 
them in a like manner. 

He would never return to his 
home. It was no longer his home, 
now. He was going to the campus. 
He would not be a stranger there. 
He would be with his own kind. The 
metamorphosis was now complete. 



Send us a letter 

. ,BUT 

make sure it s: 

1) typed, double-spaced, 60 spaces 

2) less than two pages. 




THE nilAST WAY 



It's a Star-Spangl«d VaKi* 
Pared* thto Weak at Hnaall 



Oe 19W »hO0plng Mrtr *•' It* 
4IW rewH Nntf Mm wU—t 
v»rtMr or 4u«Nfr produen 
d four tmvortf bfitdi r—dy 
10 m»k» TO*" Itolklaii porfoet. 




Sl»r1 ColobroUng Ctrti with Thoao -Bang Up" 
Vmluot.. MofO$ lop OttoHtr *or An -AIIAmorlean" Cook-Out 



Boneless Beef Shoulder Steak for 

London Broil 

Juicy-Flavorfol Cut the Way ¥00 Like It Thicti or Thm Perfect lor Grilling 




Frankfurts 



Finasi Regular 
All Beet 7S' 



f^\ \ HtAFran 

hi L^ Bigvalu 

^^V, :lHi First Pria 

^Ki. . ' Tv-.-v Armour I 



kfurt Revolution this Week ai Fmasr 

Value Franks »'— 99' 

ze Franks - - • 1.19 

Hot Odqs V 69* 

Armour Beef Franks 79* 



Oscar Mayer Wieners 
Tasty Ten Franks 
Texas Werners 
Colonial Beef Franks 



Swift 
Hostess 



juniboCrabCI«w« 

1 



Canned Hams Beef Tenderioin 

4 lb C89 Whole Beet Fillet ^ 39 

can ^y 5 to 7 lbs Whole ^£ ^ 

Prime Italian Sausage ^, 89^ 




Ready to Heat 
Glaze and Garnish 



Canned Ham 
s Bacon ir;. 



Bologna 
Bologna •' 



fully cooked 
fV,m Meaty 



1.29 
1.99 



If/tedtutT^Shrirnp;;:; • 
fted Snappef Pi»«» 



hawahah 

PUNC*< 

• sit) 



Fr»th Baktd Irom Our Btliorf 

Hot Dog Rolls 

^pk9s400 




79* 



Swiss Cheese "^rr ■. 1.49 

Chicken Rotrvr* ,1.39 

Potato Salad '^ 4»* 

Polish Kielt>a8a -TTT 1.39 

Genoa Salamt ^.n. 1 1.09 



■ t.' . •-: 49" 



•■ toix* Oa* <P»t 



froth Olrr Yttu—I 



.r:r- J 



, BID i^^^ 



Fat Free 



Befit Yogurt 



All Flavors 
Swiss Style 



Cottage Cheese ■ -.. ' - 1.09 

Orange Jutoe •-» ';:: S3* 

Frosted Shakes*—^ 4 .>:'M* 

Finast Butter o...... :.* 09' 

Sa»o With Thoto CoMpont 



Finast Fresh 
Enriched 



Dessert Shells 49* 

aacked Wheat Bread. 2 89' 

English N/luffins 3 1.00 

White Bread 3 100 

Donuts 2 1.00 



Junior Pies 

5 



F.nast 
Fresn 



p"9S 



100 



Peanut Butterc 
Hawaiian Punch 
Star-Kist Tuna 
Finast Soda 
iced Tea Mix 



Planters 180/ 
Creamy Smooth |g, 



Mor* Grocery Vtluot 



II P»f* M tlnp Ih* fmtti War 

Shop Our Wtat Vtrttlf or Ou*»t|i 
troitn rooitt (nd Stit lor Ih* 4ir> 

Lemonade 

76o^400 
cans I 



FinasI 



Cheese Pizza 
Cream Pies 
Seafood Platter 
Creem Whip 

Potatoes 



'6o; 
cans 

2 
3 



Lemonade Mix 
IMabisco Snacks 
Vlasic Relishes 
Paper Rates 
Marshmallows . . 



^., "" » 



99- 
65' 
1.00 
79' 
37* 



49« 

37* 

51* 
39« 

79* 

In Sloru Boko Shop Spoclolf 

Cake Donuts 

Available m Stores one ^1 ^^C 
witl, Bake Shop doien "^^^ 

Assorted Turnovers. . 4 •« 69* 



Red 



Chunk 
Light 



AM Your 
Favorile Flavors 



Finast 



46 o? 
can 

6'/ oz 

can 

48 01 

bli 

10 env 
Pkg 



flrtl O' Iho Froth Product from FInotI! 
Plekod 01 Iho Peak ol forlocllon 



1.00 

1.00 

69< 

39* 







Save 25 



On th* PwchaM o* On* 
?0 lb bag Frnasi ilidwood 

Charcoal Briquets 

tf^^AM n- 1 ****" * *MinM* □« t^ o Mae 

l^^Qf Lfj M»r«vaMI>^-» Ml It —t {>>» 



Save 59 'H Save 15' 



f>^ tal ^ 



Yuban Inst 
Coffee 

B8BI..E,.-:. 



>« I 



0» *jo m* 

Red Rose 
Tea Bags 

S ■<•'• 

•^ "Vt, Jt#W It ' 



Save IS'H Save 10' 



<>9 * ■»*("■ A" 



Kool Pops 



S Hi't I 



Medicated 
Powder 



^>.//Fresli Peaclies 

I ^,^ These Luscious Peaches ^^^B^^^B 

w9 



Slim Jim 
Shopstfinq 



40 o/ 
pfcq 



69 



Tomatoes 
Cucumbers 



Are a Good Source ol 

Vilamm A and Niacin 

and a Fair Source ol Vitamin C 



59' Texas Onions 3.1.59' 

29' Sunkist Lemons 8 59' 



Enast 



ISUPERMARKETS 

^«M (tIKtnx in>« WM JMt ) 



* 



Hr****************^***** ••••••••••> 



Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Your Horoscope Week 



ARIES (March 21-April 19): 
New deal is offered. Accept. 
Roadblocks are removed if you 
display originality, in- 
dependence, pioneering spirit. 
Leo, Aquarius persons might be 
involved. Emphasis is on 
partnership, joint efforts. You 
gain anchor of security. Key is 
to build on solid structure. 

Security is attained by careful 
evaluation of situation affecting 
partnership proposal. Gain 
cooperation from key people. 
One who pulls money strings is 
willing to listen if you make 
minor concession. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): 

Teach and learn cooperate 

with one who is progressive, 
independent and intuitive. You 
may feel pace is slow, but you 
are making progress. Keep 
medical, dental appointments. 
Avoid extremes. Aquarius, Leo 
p)ersons could play key roles. 

Events occur behind the 
scenes which affect you. Study 
details, including fine print. 
Accent is on those who hold 
opposing views. You could be 
caught in middle of dispute. Be 
frank enough to state that you 
do not wish to become in- 
volved. That is your best 
course neutrality. 



GEMINI (May 21 -June 20): 
Flurry of activity could cause 
confusion. Be careful with 
valuables. Don't misplace or 
give up something of value for 
nothing. Another Gemini and a 
Sagittarian might be involved. 
Accent is on creativity, in- 
tensified relationship. 

Study Taurus message for 
valid hint. Emphasis is on plans 
which have not been solidified. 
Relative may be in mood for 
argument. Know it and be 
patient. Keep health 

resolutions. A change is due 
and you find out about it today. 

CANCER (June 21 -July 22): 
You have more responsibility 
than previously supposed; 
maintain balance, aplomb. Do 
some remodeling, revising. Get 
details into focus. Take nothing 
for granted. Some around you 
are impatient and lack faith. 
Don't be disturbed by 

mediocrity set your own 

standards and adhere to 
principles. Creative endeavors 
pay dividends. Take cold 
plunge. Stop procrastinating. 
You will receive en- 
couragement, backing from 
family. Know it and be con- 
fident. Member of opposite sex 
plays significant role. 






OPEN •• 

hJonTri 10-9 
Sat 10-6 



l^ouTE 9- H^Dtty 



casual (Qualify clofhing 

-fair prices and 

1Hfe friendliest 

of service... 



LEO (July 23-August 22): 
Control impulses. Give logic a 
chance to operate. You may be 
asked to give up something of 
value for a mere promise. You 
will be cajoled, flattered. Key is 
to perceive situation in light of 
reality. If you do this, you will 
be building for future security. 
Build. Plan. Unearth important 
documents. Be ready to close 
transaction. Family security 
may be involved. Be careful, 

diplomatic and positive that 

you are getting money's worth. 
Look beneath surface; read 
between the lines. 

VIRGO (August 23- 
September 22): Past efforts 
bear fruit. You are rewarded for 
being responsible. Relationship 
intensifies. Nothing is apt to 
occur in lukewarm fashion. It is 
all or nothing. Know it and 
don't play games with 
emotions. Capricorn, Caner 
persons figure prominently. 

Accent is on short trips, 
ideas, relations and neighbors. 
Pisces plays significant role and 
so does another Virgo. You 
may be disillusioned with one 
who makes numerous 
promises. Re-evaluate. Get 
priorities in order. 



LIBRA (September 23- 
October 22): Accent is on wish 
fulfillment, gain through special 
collection or interest paid on 
debt. You finish project. 
Prestige is on upswing. Aries, 
Libra persons could be in- 
volved. Seek ways of improving 
distribution. 

Spotlight is on gain through 
creativity, originality. Welcome 
fresh approach, new contacts. 
You will be privileged to attend 
rehearsal or discussion, 
enabling you to perceive vital 
process. Be aware enough to 
appreciate and learn. 

SCORPIO (October 23- 
November21): Fresh approach 
wins plaudits. Your position is 
elevated. Cycle is high and you 
overcome obstacles through 
correct timing. Leo could play 
important role. Showmanship is 
in picture. You are able to 
effectively illustrate meanings. 

You come alive; you utilize 
your own style. Creative 
process is activated. Timing is 
on target. You look and feel 

better past errors are 

corrected. Cancer, Aquarius 
individuals could play 
significant roles. Trust inner 
feelings. 



dso visit 
oup {Record' 
' / Room 



I 



'v> 



Kids . 
jerse\Js 



N 



Gea+lerr\aa 
TJbKrv. 
shirts 

Qssorteol 



LarKlbbiser 
dertim 



Ovemlls 
ia Kids' f 



^At-r 



a. 



Durthom IrulCl^ers 



Thursday, June 27, l?74 

SAGITTARIUS (November 
22- December 21): What was 
settled may be revived. Accent 
is on additional information, 
changes which affect 
correspondence, com- 
munication. Aries, Libra per- 
sons may be involved. Finish 
assignments. Hold off on new 
projects. Do research which 
takes you behind scenes of 
group, organization. You get lift 
through spiritual guidance. You 
feel light as a burden is lifted. 
Pleasant contacts, reactions are 
featured. Display versatility and 
humor. Sense of fitness 
returns. Cooperate in charitable 
project. Visit one confined to 
home, hospital. 

CAPRICORN (December 22- 
January 19): Friend provides 
information, contacts which 
can release cash flow. Know it 
and be receptive. Accept social 
invitation. Reach beyond 
current expectations. Gemini, 
Sagittarius individuals could 
play paramount roles. Obtain 
hint from Sagittarius message. 
You may be reaching beyond 
previous expectations. This 
could arouse envy, possible 
retaliation. Accent is on 
marriage, joint efforts, 
cooperation from mate or 
partner. Legal affairs need 
review. Keep copies of im- 
portant documents. 
(Continued on P. 11) 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page n 



/ 



w^ 



breaKtxway 
tops ' 



Levi 's 

corduroy 
or derxim 

bell bottoms 



"7\ 



Trye 
boots 



Women's Center remains active f"^^^'"^^' "^^^^ volunteers 



The Southwest Women's Center 
is rounding out its third full year of 
existence. It has been functioning 
as a center for university women as 
well as a center for area women. 
The goals are many and it is hoped 
to provide women with resources 
and academic courses which will 
help them challenge the racism and 
sexism which exists within the 
framework of our society. 

All of the Center courses form an 
intergral part of the universities 
Women's Studies Program. Some 
of the courses may be taken to 
fulfill elective requirements of 
certain departments. It's a good 
idea to check out the courses in the 
Center which are cross-listed with 
other departments (psych., English, 
Rhetoric). Those women who need 
to fulfill university core 
requirements may be interested to 
know that we offer a Women's 
Rhetoric course which satisfies this 
requirement. 

The S. W. Women's Center is 
located in the faculty apartment of 
Mackimmie Dormitory. There is 
usually a student staff person there 
in the afternoons so please stop in 
because we want to hear from you. 
Our number is 545-0626. Students 
with questions about the courses 
please call the S. W. Academic 
Affairs office in John Adams 
Dormitory and they will help you 
with registration hassles or supply 
you with more information con- 
cerning courses. Stop in orran area 
tour. There will be a member of the 
staff there to explain the programs, 
workshops and workgroups. 



SOUTHWEST FEMINIST 
COURSE 

OFFERINGS FALL 1974 

1. 190 Women In Africa - 
Christie Achebe £t Nana Sheshibe. 

2. 290 Biological & Cultural Bases 
of Sex Differences — Marsha 
Greenstein. 

3. 290 Media Project — Elana 
Nachman. 

4. 190 The Woman in American 
History — Arlene Ryan. 

5. 290 Racism & Sexism ih tfie 
Public Schools — Kathy Salisbury. 

6. 290 An Economic History of 
Women 1840 - World War II - 
Bobby Ramsey &• Marjorie 
Levenson. 

7. 290 Women in the World of 
Work — Jeanann Boyce. 

8. 190 Sex Roles in Con- 
temporary Society (several sec- 
tions). 

9. 190 Man and Woman in 
Literature (cross listed with English) 
— Margo Culley. 

10. 390 Woman as Hero (cross- 
listed with English) — Maurianne 
Adams. 

11. 390 Combatting Racism- 
Sexism in the Schools (cross listed 
with Education) — Nancy 
Schniedewind. 

12. 190 Women's Rhetoric 
(cross-listed with Rhetoric) — 
Shirley Morahan. 

13. 190 Women, American 
Politics and Capitalist Society — 
Joan Cox. 

14. 390 Women and the Law — 
(cross-listed with Legal Studies) — 
Janet Rifkin. 

15. 290 Women's Social Roles 



and Mental Health — several in- 
structors share the course. 

Most of the Center courses will 
take place one night a week at one 
of the Southwest dorms. The 
Center for Racial Understanding, or 
the Malcolm X Center. Classes can 
be rescheduled to meet the needs 
of the class. You may also sign up 
for any of these classes in Sep- 
tember. We look forward to seeing 
you in the fall. 



Infirmary 

(In An 
Emergency) 

(54)9-2671 






Volunteers are needed to 
help with the summer festival 
benefit to be held on the 
Amherst Town Common, 
Saturday and Sunday, July 13 
and 14, sponsored by the Black 
Cultural Center of New Africa 
House at UMass to raise funds 
for the establishment of a Black 
Cultural Center Library and an 
Infant Care Center. 

The Black Cultural Center 
wants to recruit volunteers for 
the following positions: an 
entertainment coordinator 
(male), a mistress of 
ceremonies, four workers to 
handle office telephone calls, a 
coordinator for the craft sale, a 
professional auctioneer, for 
advertisement solicitors to 
contact local merchants, a 
ticket seller for children's rides, 
twenty festival captains (male), 
a coordinator for the tag sale, 
and a coordinator for the bake 
sale. Interested parties are 
asked to call 545-0794 or 545- 
2426. 



The events of the festival will 
include an auction, tag and 
bake sales, and crafts. 
Donations of furniture and 
other household items are 
being sought; pickup service 
can be arranged, all hobbyists, 
craftsmen, and artists are in- 
vited to display their wares; 
anyone with anything 
to sell may participate 
in the tag sales. The festival will 
also include concerts, drama, 
fashion and talent shows, and 
children's entertainment. 

iMew Africa House is in 
desperate need of funds to 
establish a Black Cultural 
Center Library and an Infant 
Care Center. All proceeds of the 
summer festival will go toward 
these goals. Everyone is invited 
to attend. 

Gallery open 

The University or Massachusetts 
Art Gallery, located in Herter Hall 
Annex, will be open to the public 
Tuesday-Friday 1:00-4:00 p.m. 



FENTONS ATHLETIC 



SUPPLIES 



/ 



All Your TENNIS Needs 



"V 



Your Horoscope Week 



( Continued 

AQUARIUS (January 20- 
February 18): Disputes flare 
between relatives. You could be 

inextricably involved unless 

you put foot down. Means be 
your own person. Forget feuds. 
Avoid getting back to wall with 
partner, mate. Improve image; 
give attention to public 
relations. Don't sign anything in 
haste. Accent is on goal, 
ambition, ability to climb over 
obstacles. Key now is flexibility. 
Bob and weave; refuse to be 
caught flatfooted. Spotlight is 
on dealings with professional 

superiors and coming to 

terms with yourself. 

PISCES (February 19-March 
20): You are associated now 
with long distances, either 
through calls, correspondence 
or actual travel. Your horizons 
are broadened. Aquarius, Leo 



from P. 10) 

and Scorpio persons could 
figure in important ways. Open 
lines of communication. 
Plenty of talk but not much 

action that may be the 

keynote. Gemini, Virgo persons 
are featured, with Sagittarius 
also in picture. Accent is on 
disrupted communications, 
changes where travel plans are 
concerned. You get en- 
couragement from one who 
aided in past. 



RACKETS 
BALLS 
SHOES 

RESTRINGING 
Also — Softball Supplies and Swim Wear 

Open AAon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -5:30, 

Sat., 9 a.m.-l p.m. . v 

377 MAIN ST., AMHERST, 253-3973 



V. 




NOW 
ONLY 



SR-10 

SR-11 
MX-lOO 



$74.95 

$89.95 

$119.95 



UNIVERSITY 
STORE 



* 



Campus Center, 
University of Maw 

Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413)545 2619 




II 



THE MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, Jun« V, l»74 



»/ 



Get your Stop&Shopsworth for 
those c€>okwoiit, eat wont days. 




SlMts Mwiity, Jmw 24 — Sstwtfiy, Jww 79 

STOP & SHOP 
in HADLEY-AMHERST 
Route 9 
at the Hadley-Amherst Line. 

8:00a.m.l0:00p.m., 
Mon.Sat. 

Get your Stop & Shopsworth! 



Welchade 
Fruit Drinks 

RED QRAPC, FRUIT PUNCH 
OR .GRAPE 




Geisha Solid 
White Tuna 




7 01. Can 



B&M B8i(eil 
Pea Beans 





f NO RETURN 
28 oz 



BTL 



WITH THIS COUPON AND A » PURCHASE 



Whole Kosher 
Dill Pickles 




Sun Glory Soda 

Cllquot Club Vlasic Relishes 
Beverages 




3r QQ' 



SWEET. HOT DOQ. 
HAMBURG OR SWEET INDIA 




All Stop Sl Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience. 




Butterball Brmler 



g mimmmi 



wolatM » MM Mn w 

M Mkff rtuil <i>i«t 

•f ■Mi m tin 




Meaty little birds that baste themselves while they cook 

turn out moist and tender and delicious. For rotisserie barbecuing, insert meat thermom> 
eter in thickest part of thigh. Place drip pan made of foil in front of coals. Cook until meat 
thermometer reaches 185° 

Naturally aged for tenderness! 

Broil 

No other supermarket in America . . . not one . . . has the 
meat preparation facilities to offer beef as naturally 
tender, juicy and full of flavor as Stop & Shop's "Quality-Protected" 
beef . . . better tasting beef. If they want to, other supermarkets 
can match Stop & Shop's prices on what they call similar cuts of 
beef. But until they match our facilities, they can't match the quality 
of our beef, whether they want to or not. 

Plan a meal with a delicious Stop & Shop canned ham! 

3Ib.Catiiied Ham ^V 




We know food takes a big part of your weekly budget And 
we're working to help you stretch that budget the best 
way we know — by bringing you the lowest price we can 



tor quality meat — like our fine canned ham. Lean from 
end to end, moist, delicious, and good for more than one 
meal, it's a timely value 



More all week specials for barbecue cooking. 



Prjmo Italian Sausage 

99' 




HOT OR SWEET 




Bart>«cu« th«n lop with 
tried pepper* deiictout' 



White 




:l 



AVAllAHI IN STP.IS WITH A SCRV'CE Otll A I f lOI* J 11 

Imported Boiled Ham ^"'""'''illl!"' Bmoo 



Frozeo Flounder Fillets 



Our dell It chock full of $^58 

delicious summertime loods 



T 



Juat bake or try then 
add tartar aauce and lemon 

DMpStjTrtats '*stco«* 
Eldorado Salad Shrimp 



S119 Mapeo Cold Cuts ^,r.T..^r.. 



1 



'♦' 99* 



I IS Mte 
IM QOl 



Stop A Shop Doli Franks r,^ • >1» 
Finnish Swiss ChNSS 
INothtr Gooso Lhrorwurst 



iV 79* 



C4hA meaU from Stap€fSha^ 
Summer KHehen! 

Our chefs do the cooking, while you take the compliments! 




89' 



30 oz. Potato Salad » ° 

II* PLASTIC BEACH PAIL WITH POTATO SALAD 

Ham and Cheese Sub Sandwich ,..:";::.> .69' 

AVAILAtLl IN STOetS WITH A StXviCf Of 1.1 




'QualityPretected " Roast Beef ' 89' 

Cooked to pertect*on tiiced to your order 

Macironi and BnI 79'^ ^^Rice Pudding ""; 69\ 

NEW mOM OUR HrrCNEM ^3^«^^ SUVILS -0IT1FNEI. 




B.C. Oraogo-Apricot Orlok 
GifloSpaghottlSaMO :SliS^ 
Stop A Sliop SpagboM Saoco 

MCAT MCAUESS ON MUSHMOM 

Ocoan Spray Cranborry CocfclaH 
Kraft BarbocooSaoco 
Stop ft Shop Mastard ^^^^ZSIL 
Gloria Spanish Stoffod ORvos 
9" Papor Platos - 100 Count *^*' 
Vlasic Koshor INN Spurs 



i::39' 
»*-a9» 

H. VST 

»u ana 

* 15* 



] 



2^45' 



fiBSLemonade 

U S Gradt A fancy 

Sparkool Assorted Drinks 



"•'39' 



Cat 

11^ M 



Lemon-Llnw, RasplMrry-Ltmon, Fruit 
Punch. Grape Drink or Orange Ohnk 

Birds EyoAvraks 

Hawaiian Punch -Rod 

Swanson Chickon Dhinor 

Shoestring Potatoos sum jim mum "S;; 89* 

Stop ft Shop 10 Pack Pizza »;;f 99* 

Mrs. Paul's Onion Rings U! 50* 

Ligirt n' Lively Ice Milk 99' 

SEALTEST — NATURAL— Vi GAL CARTON 

Taste O'SeaFriod Clams 
French Fried Shrimp tute o s» 
Chock '^" Nuts Pound Cake 
Birds Eye Cool Whip 
Stop ft Shop Ice Cream • fumws 
Caterers Sherbet s havoas 
Stop ft Shop Choc-lit Covers 



r« 791 



*•> OOa 

'A.r79« 

Co* ^ 

3c:s»i 

3cSS'1 

ncMwi oOi 
Km Hit •• 



^[ WBwryTw^^B ^Mi^i 



] 



White Gem Chicken Breast 

When you buy U.S. Grade "A", White Gem tf^ f%|* 
chickens, you buy the sweetest tasting 9CK 
chicken that money can buy. ^^^^ >o 



to SI 



1 rOUNO PACKACi 

A great way to start the day. 
Get your Stop & Shopsworth 

Cotonial Tasty Ten Franks 
Colonial Beef Franks 
Smoked Pork Butts 

Handschumacher Knockwurst 

CATCH WEIGHT 

Old fashioned value like this, 
gives you your Stop A Shopsworth 

Colonial Family Pack iv. i n ms ,^ 

BOLOGNA OR LIVERWURST 

Colonial Sliced Bologna 
Colonial Sliced Cold Cuts 



i£$f Cheeseboard 

SHARP CHEDDAR BAR 

Shrimp Cocktail-3 Pack 

SEAMAID — 4 oz. JARS 

Cotombo Yogurt sa«voas 3 
Stop ft Shop American Choose 

INOlViOU*LlY WRAPPED - »WITI 0* YlllOW 

Borden Country Store Spread 

SWISS OA CHCDOAR 

Breakstone Sour Cream 
Crescent or Cinnamon Rolls ^HS^ 
Reddi Whip Whipped Cream 
Mrs. Filbert's Margarine ' SSJStY« 
Kraft "•°;;(rr Swiss Cheese 



89' 

99' 



89* 
89* 

69* 

59* 



(«; 

rug 

lu 

Ctiri 

leu 

Coot 

3^;;»i 

Cm !«»^ 



49* 



l« 



i$l Daisy White Bread 




REGULAR OR 
THIN SLICED 



JiiJ^'l 



1 ID 
fug 



lOlO n» lUIUkY OllVt Ok lUNCNCOk lOAf 



SANTA ROSA 



Banana Tea Bread 22-*] 

Oatt Nut Bread 1 3 m or Cranberry Nut Bread 12 Ol 

Stop ft Shop Oatmeal Bread V'j; 39* 

Stop ft Shop Fudge Cake '^ 

Kitchen Cupboard Donuts 
Stop ft Shop Lemon Pie 



STorasNor 

ft M PW •( 1} ' 

llM Mi 



Stop ft Shop Rhubarb Pie 



»i 



89* 







889< 



Sanitary Napkins i' RQC 

STor t SHOP - simn cm mo "•• Uw 

69' 



Sot CAN 



Bi Rigirt Guard 

C REGULAR. NATURAL, POWDER 
*,- OR UNSCENTEO DCOOOfUNT 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 13 



Legal asst. program begins Sept. 



This fall, a Legal Assistant 
Training Program will be im- 
plemented at Springfield Technical 
Community College by the UMass 
Division of Continuing Education. 

The program will consist of eight 
courses designed to provide th« 



potential for entry into the system 
of legal services. Participants will be 
able to work while gaining cer- 
tification in either the private or 
public areas of law. 

Individuals will be trained as 
lawyers assistants in such areas as 



Hunter quits; questions 
Sarge's motives 



The National Spokeswoman for 
People Against National Identity 
Cards (PANIC) has announced her 
resignation from Governor 
Sargent's Special Commission on 
Privacy and Personal Data. 

In a letter sent to the Solstice, 
Caroline Hunter said the following 
"facts of great concern to the 
public have not reached them": 

— The board has begun to 
computerize arrest records despite 
the fact that regualtions have not 
been completely drafted, enacted, 
reviewed by the public, etc. 

— The Boast continues to 
emphasize a 'need' for retaining 




KillAWatt 

CONSERVE ENERGY 



arrest records not resulting in a 
guilty plea. 

— No limits have been placed on 
the extended use of the Cori 
System, beyond giving the board 
power to expand as it sees fit, such 
as in the Curran study, the ap- 
plication of information in an 
experimental study." 

Hunter accused Sargent of not 
properly funding the commission 
"in order to make its existence, 
operation and work useful." 

She said PANIC'S purpose is to 
serve "the people, not the interests 
of Governor Sargent or any other 
public figure." 



Theater auditions 

I he Summer Theater Ensemble 
wishes to announce an open 
audition for their upcoming per- 
formance of "Narrow Road to the 
Deep North", a satire by Edward 
Bond. All are welcome to attend 
the tryouts that will be held 
Monday and Tuesday evening at 
room 163 in the Campus Center. 
The script will be available in the 
RSO office on the Student Union 
balcony for those interested. 



corporate law, real estate, probate, 
and civil-criminal litigation. Those 
that express an interest in public 
law will be instructed in such 
subjects as welfare rights, landlord- 
tenant relations, domestic relations, 
and consumer affairs. Students can 
acquire the skills necessary to work 
in a large corporation, in a large law 
firm, for a single practitioner, or in 
an office of neighborhood legal 
services. 

Students should expect to attend 
three classes per week throughout 
the first and second semesters. In 
order to meet the needs of qualified 
and interested students who work, 
during the day, the program will 
offer evening courses during week- 
day evenings and on Saturdays 
during the day. The scheduling of 
evening and Saturday classes will 
enable participants to complete the 
requirements of the program within 
one calendar year. 

To be admitted into the legal 
Assistant Training Program ap- 
plicants must have completed at 
least two years of college- level 
work, or have extensive work- life 
experiences in the field of law, or be 
able to prove to an admissions 
committee that he or she possesses 
the required skills to successfully 
participate in the rigorous training 

program and also that he or she 
possesses the requisite personal 
attributes for a legal assistant. 

Legal assistants trained under 
this 24 credit-hour program will be 
expected to have developed skills 
in: 

— applying knowledge of law and 
legal procedure in order to render 
direct assistance to lawyers 
engaged in legal research; 

— designing, developing, or 
planning modifications of 
procedures, techniques, services, 
processes or applications; 

— preparing or interpreting legal 



documents, or writing procedures 
for engaging in the practice of 
certain fields of law; 

— selecting, compiling, and using 
technical information from such 
references as digests, en- 
cyclopedias, or practice manuals; 

— analyzing and following 
procedural problems that involve 
independent decisions. 

Completion of the Legal 
Assistant Training Program will 
result in a certificate of completion 
trom the Division of Continuing 
Education of the University of 
Massachusetts in Amherst. In 



addition, academic credit will be 
given by the Division of Continuing 
Education of Springfield Technical 
Community College to those 
students who wish to apply their 
work towards a degree program. 
The program is approved by the 
Veterans Administration. 

Brochures, applications, and 
further information are available 
from Harvey Stone, Director, Legal 
Assistant Training Program, 
Division of Continuing Education, 
104 Hills North, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
01002, telephone (413) 545-3410. 



^^ ^ ^ • « PI ^ ^Jl ^Jll^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 1^ ^^ ly, ly, ,y| f^j, ,y, ly, ^^ (^ ^ , n , ^,^ 



i Classifieds 



^ HAIR STYLING 



, FOR SALE 



AITOS KOH SM.V. 



Thoroghbrrd typp marr. agp: 12 years; 
hpighl: l.S.:i hands. Kides Knglish and 
Western, good brood mare potential. Mt. 
Toby SUbles. .St»-I677. 

tr7-l8 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long. Let us shape and 
main'-in your hair through the long 
hot summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers by RK and AMINO PON. 
Your style center, 253-98114. 
C'ollegetown tniaex, 183 No. Pleasant 
St.. Amherst. Mass. 

tn-is 



M t'orvair Convertible, runs but needs 
motor. Kxcellenl body, take a look and 
make an offer. Hob, 2.Vl-i24l. 

B-27 

1970 Fiat K.SO Kaccr. almost lu mpg. 
great little car and super economical. 
Must sell, asking t9!t0. or best offer. Rob. 

6-27 

VU 'Ii6 nev\ly rebuilt engine, body ok. 
Must sell inimed. Need cash. %MH>. Mv>- 
4137. 

«-27 

MOTORCYCLES 



Yamaha .ISO, IMH, 19000 miles. Runs 
good, must sell for first I3!i0, or best offer. 0< 
Rob, 2.'>:J-724I. •^ 

0-27 



BICYCLES 



HELP WANTED 



Officials needed part-time, contact 
Intramural Office, Rm. Zt.'i. Boyden. 

tf«-27 



Easy RMer 10 Speed. Wm in coatesi and 
never used, sells for tl20. Must sell for IMS. 
Bob, 2S3-7Z4I. 

0-27 



WANTED 



BICYCLES 



Need cycling info? Repairs, rentals, 
sales of all modern bicycles. Peluton, I 
East Pleasant St.. Amherst Carriage 
.Shops. 

tn-is 



I want to buy your sick or ailing car, any 
make, any model, aiu problem, foreign or 
domesUc. Call Bob, ,:..3-724l, for fast Wt. 

a 

SERVICES 

Car repair hassles? Experienced 
mechanic will fix it right. No problem to 
large or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
Bob, 253-7241. 

tfH-15 



Jf< 



Mtf|^W>W««MMMWtfWWMMIftfMMWMin<¥MMMiniin«»n«Wtfin«MtfWMVyVMMT 



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I 



:• '• 



c 



^ t I Ifr ^ • 



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NIKKOJ 



5010 



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With professional wide range. Gives smooth, 
fatigue-free response 2 octaves beyond ordin- 
ary dynamics. 



Shure 
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magnetic 

eliptical 

cartridge 



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PHO 4flfl 



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Elac/Mlracord 

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Automatic 

Turntable 



$235 



^^ I dust cover/base 



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SX-424 

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- CO Piorveen — 

SX-626 

52 watts RMS 

$32 9 . 9 



"Linear Sound" is sound with equal intensity throughout the musical range. A 
loudspeaker with linear sound reproduces bass notes as loudly as it does the treble or 
mid range. The sound of EPI 90's is so lenear and natural that the speaker almost 
disappears. . . leaving only the music. (The EPI 90 is identical acoustically to the top 
rated EPI 100, only in a vinyl clad cabinet for $30 less per pair). Asa suitable power 
source for the EPI's we've chosen the NikkoSOK) FM stereo receiver with 48 watts of 
power (R M.S ) this unit features FMinterstation muting and out puts for two sets of 
speakers The dependable Glenburn2155 turntable has a light weight aluminum tone 
arm, viscous damped cueing and includes a Shure M75EC eliptical magnetic car 
tridge, dust cover and base. Discover linear sound and save SlOO off the list price. 



OHM 



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[tech hifi] 

^— Quality Components at the Right Price— ^ 

259 Triangle St. Amherst 549-2610 
186 Main St. Northampton 586-2552 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



Pag* 14 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 



Day School Outing Club canoe trip tonight 



The University Day School is 
accepting applications for the fall 
session. 

Eligibility: Parents must be 
students or non-professional staff. 
Children must be within 2 years 9 
months and 5 years. 

Priorities: Applications are ac- 
cepted continuously, and ac- 
ceptances in a particular semester 
are made according to the date of 
each application. 
M 



Schedule 
semester 

8:30-12:30 
1:00-5:00 
7:30 - 8:30 
12:30-1:00 
5:00 - 5:30 



F per one 

$115. 

$115 

$30. 

$15 

$15 

Calendar: School is open when 
the University is in session, and is 
closed during all University 
holidays, vacations and recesses. 
For application information — 
call the University Day School, 545- 
2466. 

Body 
Communication 

Amherst, Mass. - "Personal 
Growth Through Bodily Ex- 
pression," a workshop designed to 
explore the body as a means of 
expression and communication, will 
be offered this summer by , the 
Summer Arts Institute of the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

The workshop will be held at the 
Bowditch Lodge near the 
University Stadium July 1, 2, 8, 9 
and 11, from 2:30 to 4:30. Ms. 
Varda Dascal will be the instructor. 

She has studied and worked in 
Uruguay, Israel, Brazil, and France 
and while affilioted with the 
Division of Continuing Education at 
UMass has taught courses in 
painting, creative movement, and 
swimming. The workshop is open 
to the public. More information is 
available from Continuing 
Education at 15 Hills North, UMass, 
telephone 545-3440. 

Project 

offering 
workshops 

This summer, for the first time, 
UMass students will have the 
opportunity to receive credit while 
exploring mechanisms with which 
to change the conditions of their 
lives. As part of its program to 
establish realistic alternatives, the 
Student Organizing Project is 
sponsoring Organizing Student- 
Initiated Change, a mixture of 
research and ongoing workshops 
dealing with such subjects as 
economic cooperatives, student 
legal rights, alternative social 
services, and the University 
governance process. 

Workshops will meet on a regular 
basis throughout the summer 
session, developing practical skills 
in community organizing, legal 
research, alternative political 
structures, the use of the media, 
how to run a mimeograph machine, 
and other topics which will be of 
use to all individuals wishing to 
learn techniques of community- 
initiated change. 

The Student Organizing Project 
arose from the need for more 
extensive student involvement in 
the University decision-making 
process: Operating out of offices on 
the third floor of the Student Union 
Building, the Project seeks to 
provide concrete means by which 
students can gain greater control 
over their lives. 

The workshops will be open to 
UMass students, interested 
members of the surrounding 
communities, and students from 
other colleges. For further in- 
formation on the Project or to sign 
up for the Organizing Institute, 
contact the Student Organizing 
Project at 545-2415 or 545-0341, or 
come by 428 Student Union 
Building. 



The UMass Outing Club is 
beginning its summer program with 
trips going out every Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoon. These trips 
will leave at 5:00 p.m. from the 
Student Union. There will be 
canoeing, rock climbing, caving, 
hiking and surprises all summer 
long. Everyone is welcome. The 
trips are geared toward the 
beginner. 

There will also be weekend trips. 
For more information stop by the 
bulletin board next to the ballroom 



in the Student Union or come by 
the office in Room 415 of the 
Student Union. Office hours are 
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 6 
to 7 p.m. but it will likely be open 
during the day at various hours. 

There will be a canoeing trip to 
the Greenfield River leaving today 
at 5 p.m. from the Student Union. 
Tuesday, July 2, there will be a rock 
climbing trip to Chapel Ledge. 
Students may sign up for either of 
these trips at the bulletin board. 




SUMMER IN 
AMHERST? 

529 Belchertown Rd.. 

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 
4 p.m. -6 p.m. 
25c Beer — 50c Mixed Drinks 
Kntertainment Wed. -Sat. 

DINNERS SERVED 
Mon.-Thurs. 

I Sat. 

• Sun 

f J.fl.t ■ ■ H t 



■ mi arno 



5:30 p.m-10:00 p.m. 
5:30 p.m.-n :00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m.-n :00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. -9 :00p.m. 




>:i ^_ — , 





SHi]\TS 
CcATS 



] ^W^... 




• FOR BANGLADESH P^^P WHilM dn 

I and MONDAY & TUESDAY ARE DOLLAR Nl(;nTS" 1 

!>■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ rmwH 



1 . ,, 

(rmWloVJE PQSr OFFICE -- IN AMHER^gj 



PANASONIC SUMMER SOUNDS 

Are GREAT Away From Home 



ON THE ROAD: 




WAS 




M9« 



ex 375 

P(*cis« Vertical Heao Mov«m«n( Sv*t*'" & 
tofrpjct solid state desiqn maKe CX 375 
*n 8 trai It stereo tape (iiaer with out- 
standing quality reliability. & aconomy 



BTrark sirrco |jp« plavu' eompiflir 
with <tuiiible loi.k liflhi lj' lir.ichet lh<)i 
sccurtts i.'ipt! player t» car No wires to 
connect Slide rule centrals 



NOW 



NOW *39" 



AT THE BEACH 




WAS 

»54" 



RF-1060Ttii> D.it.i-VV.tv." 
Ai' Battery fV AM Miqn 
Pul»'i>- Se»vKt' H.in,t 
Poit.il>l>' H.i.fio IC Band 
srlcctoi switi t' VU n'eler 
Squelch control T,ipe dal 
Conliiiuou* lonturai'Ha}, 
AfC 4 *t^e.^lier fa'pf^one 
lark 5i>i .1 »!Jie B.tti>" e» 
AC power ( o'd eart^tione 



NOW 
*44 




AM PORTABLE 
AC/BATT. 



M4 



Ueiuxe AC/BMtery FM/AM 
'nn*b4« Radio 1 watt power 
output IC 4 ' speaknr Tuning 
•oetar Oai light 2 step ba-ts 
imd continuous trebia controls 
AFC MPX iaf> 



39" 



ic SALE ENIS SAT., JURE 2ltli 



SEIDEN SOUNDS 



LAFAYETTE 

RADIO-ELECTRONICS 



15 E. Pleasant St 
AMHERST 

549-1105 




THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 

Tidbits 

Youth project 



The Reciprocal Youth Project is a 
project sponsored by the In- 
ternational Affairs Division of the 
American Friends Service Com- 
nnittee, Inc. Its aim is to provide 
North American and Puerto Rican 
young people with a formative, 
existential experience in relation to 
the nature of the impact of the U.S. 
economic and military power in 
Puerto Rico. 

In the past, some of the areas its 
volunteers have been involved with 
include issues of farm workers 
migration, labor affairs, the 
pharmaceutical industry and 
relations between Puerto Rican 
communities in the United States 
and Puerto Rico. Presently, the 
RYP is recruiting 5 candidates for 
participants to go to Puerto Rico. 
Candidates should be between 17 
and 25 years old, have at least a 
conversational skill of Spanish and 
be able to leave during October and 
stay until January. 

There is a limited amount of 
scholarship assistance available. 
For further information, contact the 
Center for Outreach Program in 409 



Goodell, tel. 545-2021 or Frances 
Crowe, American Friends Service 
Committee at 3 Langworthy Road, 
Northampton, Mass. tel. 584-8975. 

Library tours 

Tours of the main University 
Library will be given this week 
today and Friday June 27 and June 
28 at 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. During 
the remainder of the summer 
session, general tours will be given 
. each Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 
p.m. 

Tours leave from the entrance 
lobby. All are welcome. 

Special arrangements can be 
made for groups or classes with 
particular subject interests: for 
further information, call Paula 
Mark, Reference Department, 
University Library, 545-0150. 



Page is 



Children's 

workshops 

Children s workshops in 
movement will be held this summer 
at the Grace Episcopal Church in 
Amherst for children ages 3 to 7, 
sponsored by the Summer Arts 
Institute of the UMass Division of 
Continuing Education. 

Three to four year olds must 
meet from 10 to 11 a.m. The five to 
seven year olds meet afternoons 
from 1 to 2 p.m. A child may enroll 
for the July or August session or for 
both, since each session is unique. 

Early registration is encouraged 
because enrollment is limited to 20 
children. The Arts Extension 
Service, Division of Continuing 
Education, Hills North, UMass 
Amherst, telephone 545-2013, has 
full information and registration 
forms. 



HADLEY DRIVE-IN 



Rta 9 



Theatre 



Hadley 



IT'S ELEVEN O'CLOCK- 



Relax 
Sunday Evenings 

with a 
delicious dinner 

at the 

Eating Place 

and a 

fine feature film 

at the 



^ CAMPUS 

CuUtMU 12-3 



With every full dinner. It 
( hiiires (except Deltnnnico 
»leal(.< althe JamnH McManui 
r>a(ing place on Sunday evrntngi. 
a free pass will be given to the 
feal'jrr film of ^our choice at the 
( din pus Cinemas 12-3 Tlien, 
n/le- thi' ihow you can return 
With .vur pail iikb to McManui 
/or a rrfrr$hing ice cram cone 
"fg Mtri abioluttly FREE 

• ine drive 

'ite parkini iporr 

one price f ) 00 plut (ojc 

/nr one complete and rtlaxtng 
evKnirn 

Each Paos It Valid Only On 
Dale Stampad 

ZAYRE'S SHOPPING PLAZA 

Rte 9 Hadley 




TASTING LIFE THE HARD WAY! 



Co-Hit: SLAUGHTER HOTEL 



NOW SHOWING AT CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 

CAMPUS (^cftema^ 

RT 9 HADLEY IN ZAYRE'S SHOPPING CNTR 256-6411 




Page U 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Thursday, June 27, 1974 




Too much study and no fun 



This man is seldom in such good company. But the 
tirst student who identities him to the editors, room 422 
ot the Student Union, wins a tree beer. 



T 

R 
I 
V 



A 





He'd walk a million miles for one of her smiles. ..but see page 2 
to find out where he was really walking.. and why 



Alumni: This place is too big' 



BYMIKEKNEELAND 

"I'd want my daughter to go to a 
smaller school. ..and she does." 

That was a typical response of 
many UMass alumni who gathered 
last weekend for reunion*. They 
came from classes as far back as 
1914 and in the words of alumni 
director John O'Connell they were 
"overawed by the University's 
size." 

One of the 1000 men and women 
in attendance viewed the campus 
pond as one of the few salvaging 
forces here. Said the white-haired 
1919 grad: "I'm glad I'm not going 
here now. It's too big. ..you aren't 
going to do away with the pond are 
you?" 

"I'll be honest with you," his 



eyes staring out a 10th floor 
window in the Campus Center, "I 
don't like the way the place is run 
now." 

Senate Treasurer Paul Hamel, an 
invited Alumni "Friend", said such 
comments are understandable. He 
pointed out that most of the Alumni 
at the reunion were graduated in 
small classes. "One guy said he had 
110 people in his graduating class," 
he noted. 

Sipping highballs overlooking the 

campus, some Alumni acted like 

freshman here for orientation. 

'What's that building over there?" 

one woman asked. 

"That's the new Fine Arts 
Center," came the response. "I 
think it looks like a slab of corv 
Crete." 



Said another: "It's a reinforced 
concrete pillbox." 

Coed dormitories drew « variety 
of opinions. One 1949 grad said he 
wished he had spoken up when the 
issue was raised by the University. 

O'Connell said he was pleased 
with the turnout. Besides lun- 
cheons, the alumni participated in a 
golf tournament, had an op- 
portunity to buy UMass souveniers 
in the University Store Saturday, 
and were given bus tours of the 
campus. 

Another 1949 grad said he saw 
nothing wrong with coed dorms. 
He said college is a time for 
students to form their own morals 
based perhaps on what they 
learned at home. 




EMPORIUM INDIA WELCOMES you with 25 percent off 
everything in the store. 

Sale from July 1 - July 13 




Is there a dentist in t/ie tiouse? 



by Elizabeth T. Mahoney 
Dental care at the UMass Health Services 
arrived this summer: hygenicists, chairs, 
equipment, and now the only missing 
ingredients are the dentists. Dr. Clyde 
Crowson, Director of Dental Health, resigned 
last month and will terminate his services 
here on July 26. The only other dentist, hired 
to begin on July 1, failed to show at the last 
minute. Both dentists cited "personal 
reasons ... to return to private practice" for 
their resignations. 

"This will not affect our plans for a dental 
program," Barry Averill, Director of Health 



Services told the Solstice. Averill said 
University Health Services (UHS) is con- 
tacting other applicants recommended by 
the original search committee that brought 
Dr. Crowson here. 

"Time is important," Averill said, saying he 
intends the program to be fully operational 
by September. 

Crowson, who intends to remain working 
with the UMass School of Public Health from 
his new private practice in Maine, just 
completed a student dental survey in May. 
The results showed: 



— over 13,000 students suffering from 
periodontal disease, ranging from very mild 
to very severe, 

— an estimated 4.5 cavities per student, 

— 17 per cent of students postponed 
needed cavity fillings, and 

— only 18 per cent of students had ever 
used local dentists. 

Periodontal disease destroys the bone and 
gum surrounding the teeth, resulting 
eventually in the loss of teeth. The 4.5 
cavities per student is higher than the 
national average. 



Averill, in citing this survey that showed 94 
percent of students supporting prepaid 
emergency care and 90 per cent supporting a 
charge for routine care, said the continuation 
of the already established dental policies a 
"priority". 

Averill said that Crowson, who came to 
UHS in September, 1973, will have the 
opportunity in Maine to implement 
Crowson's plans for the increased use of 
allied health professionals, or hygenicists, in 
an expanded role; something that is 
prohibited in Massachusetts. 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 3 




WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1»74 



Panel concludes no 
vet school needed 



New England Land Grant 
University Presidents have en- 
dorsed a plan that could provide for 
New England residents at least 60 
spaces a year in veterinary colleges 
at substantially less cost than 
building a regional school. 

The Presidents approved and 
forwarded to Governors and to the 
New England Board of Higher 
Education (NEBHE) the report of 
their Task Force on Veterinary 
Education. It recommends that the 
states contract for spaces in 
existing veterinary colleges and that 
the states re-evaluate the long term 
alternatives: building a regional 
college or continuing cooperative 
arrangements with existing in- 
stitutions. 

Members of the UMass pre-vet 
club journeyed to Boston last 
semester to petition legislators to 
establish a veterinarian college. 
Club members also asked the 
University trustees to endorse a 
plan calling for the establishment of 
a veterinarian school at Grafton 
State Hospital grounds. The 
trustees rejected the call for action. 

Club members note there is not 
one veterinarian school in New 
England. Since most schools only 
accept state residents, it is ex- 
tremely difficult, if not plain im- 



possible, to be accepted to a 
veterinarian college. 

The task force, which submitted 
its final report to the six university 
presidents at a meeting in 
Burlington said there are 
possibilities for at least 30 contract 
admissions in existing veterinary 
colleges in the fall of 1975 and at 
least 60 contract admissions by the 
fall of 1980. The 60 admissions per 
year figure was the recommended 
level of enrollment for New England 
students under a proposed New 
England-New Jersey College of 
Veterinary Medicine suggested last 
year in a New England Board of 
Higher Education (NEBHE) 
feasibility study. 

Dr. Ben R. Forsyth, Associate 
Dean of the University of Vermont 
Division of Health Sciences and 
chairnman of the task force, said the 
study had "established the 
feasibility of the contract approach 
and the desirability of developing a 
comprehensive veterinary medicine 
program that takes advantage of 
resources in the region and in 
existing colleges of veterinary 
medicine outside the region." 

"Our study indicates that the 
most economical and efficient way 
to meet New England's veterinary 
medicine needs could be a com- 



World mourns 
Mrs. King's death 



.makes Jack a dull student. 



by Rudolph Jones 
The world was undoubtedly 
sickened and saddened by the 
tragedy that once more befell the 
King's Family. The innocent death 
of Mrs. Martin Luther King Sr. by 
Marcus Chenault, as she played the 
Lord's Prayer on the organ in the 
Ebenezer Baptist church once more 
reflect the increasing irrationality of 
American society which manifests 
itself in the Black community. 

Echoing a sense of shock and 
outrage at the incident. Prof. John 
Bracey stated that even though the 
incident seems to reflect a case of 
individual pathology, it reflects the 
extreme alienation in the American 
society where individuals have to 
commit such grotesque acts *or 
recognition. 

Roy Wilkins, director of NAACP, 
said in New Orleans that his sorrow 
was particularly keen because "her 
husband. Rev. Martin Luther King 
Sr. is a man who has shared 
everything with the civil rights 
movement including his son". 



Mayor Charles Evers of Fayette, 
Miss, whose brother Medgear was 
assassinated in 1963, said "I am 
shocked beyond words. There was 
just no sense to it ... Nobody is safe 
anymore even praying in church ... 
Nobody is safe as long as these 
people are running around with 
guns." 

In Russia Deputy White -House 
spokesman Gerald Warren said 
"The President was saddened by 
the tragic and senseless act". 

Speaking for the Kennedy family, 
Mrs. Joseph E. Kennedy said "The 
Senator and all members of the 
Kennedy family and I were sad- 
dened and deeply grieved at 
hearing the news of Mrs. Martin 
Luther King Sr. It is difficult to 
understand why God sends this 
heartbreaking cross to the same 
family twice, but we must keep our 
faith and trust in Him and be 
assured that Almighty God will 
bring us through. 



bination of contracts for veterinary 
training, coupled with clinical 
experience placement in New 
England institutions, including the 
Land Grant University veterinary 
laboratories, continuing education 
programs, expanded animal 
technician programs in New 
England, and expanded laboratory 
facilities in the New England states. 
We think there are exciting 
possibilities for new approaches to 
veterinary medical education that 
ought to be explored before the 
region commits itself to an ex- 
pensive new facility." 

The original estimates for the 
proposed New England-New 
Jersey College of Veterinary 
Medicine projected a capital cost of 
$25.8 million, including con- 
struction, land, and movable 
equipment Current estimates push 
that total closer to $30 million. The 
task force report says the maximum 
"capital cost" of a contract 
program would be $10 million. The 
annual cost of education for 
veterinary students would be about 
the same under either plan — 
around $12,000 per student, in- 
cluding tuition payments. 

The task force members said 
they could not "stress too strongly 
our conviction that the New 
England states should act together 
on contracts and other veterinary 
medical education programs. By 
acting together we can strengthen 
our position in seeking contracts, 
particularly those that would in- 
clude cooperative arrangements for 
clinical experience, diagnostic 
services, training for veterinary 
technicians, and continuing 
education. Veterinary colleges 
students in the individual states 
would have a wider selection of 
veterinary colleges. Pooling our 
resources makes economic and 
educational sense." 

The task force warned against 
delays in acting on contract 
possibilities. "If we do nothing. 
New England students may be 
closed out of the few and uncertain 
admissions opportunities now 
provided on a non-contract basis. 
State legislatures are less and less 
willing to subsidize out-of-state 
students in expensive professional 
training programs such as 
veterinary medicine. The earlier 
NEBHE studies and our own 
inquiries conform a trend toward 
cost sharing contracts for out-of- 
state students among the existing 
veterinary colleges, a course 
recommended in the National 
Academy (of Sciences Committee 
on Veterinary Medical Research 




It's all in tun under the sun. 



Ptwto by Rudolph Jones 



larceny charged 



Four UMass physical plant 
employees have been charged with 
counts of larceny of copper and 
brass belonging to the University. 

Arraigned were: John Sielski, 
supervisor of operations; Courtland 
Whittier, plumbing shop and 
physical plant; James E. Walker, 
plumber and steamfitter. Henry S. 
Scarborough, projection section 
head in the physical plant, was not 
in court so charges were not read 
against him. 

Walker and Whittier were 
charged with two counts of larceny 
of copper and brass and Sielski was 
charged with four counts of the 
same. 

The Amherst Record quotes an 
anonymous official source saying 
the value of the material was be- 
tween five and ten thousand 
dollars. The source told the Record 
it was difficult to determine the 
exact amount "because the thefts 
have apparently been occurring 
over a long period of time." 

Under the district attorney's 
investigation since May, the men 
are charged with selling the metal 
tubing and scraps to private 

and Education) report ("New 
Horizons for Veterinary Medicine", 
1972)." 

In filing the task force report, 
Forsyth said that "further ex- 
ploration of the details of contract 
possibilities and the re-evaluation of 



contractors. 

The foreman of the maintenance 
sheet metal shop defended the four 
men in a letter to District Attorney 
John Callahan. Calling the in- 
vestigation unwarranted, Clarence 
J. Hunter said the employees were 
entitled to the material under a 1962 
directive issued by the head of 
building maintenance. 

"Scrap or waste material," the 
directive says, "that automatically 
occurs in one or more of the shops 
shall be available to the men in their 
respective shops providing the 
above mentioned material has no 
value to the university and per- 
mission is granted by the foreman 
of the department." 

Dan Melley, UMass news bureau 
director, said the missing scrap 
metal is usually bid upon by several 
companies so the directive is not 
pertinent. Melley also noted that 
most of the charged men were not 
UMass employees when the 
directive was issued. 

All cases were continued to the 
October session of Hampshire 
County Superior Court. 



the regional college and contract 
alternatives are beyond our 
mandate, as are the basic public 
policy questions relating to the 
place of veterinary medical 
education in our total societal 
(Continued on P. 7) 



Wednesday. July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 2 



All set for Friday 



Your guide to the Guru 



by Mike Knee/and 
When Guru Maharaj Ji addresses 
some 10,000 of his followers here 
this weekend, he will not say he is 
God. And he will not say he is not 
God. 



Chances are that if you ask one 
of the devotees about the Guru's 
divinity status, though, you'll get a 
round-about answer to the tune of 
"What do we mean by God?" To 
mnfst followers he is definitelv 




Guru's dome under construction at the SW athletic 
field. 

About those two domes 



ByJIMPALIN 

For about two weeks, workers 

from Guru Maharaj Ji's Divine Light 

Mission have been erecting domes 

and tents for the Guru Puja Festival. 

In the Southwest athletic field is 
a 36-foot tall triangular plastic 
windowed, geodesic dome where 
the Guru will deliver his message at 
9:45 each festival evening. 

Two thousand chairs have been 



set up for the audience. 

There will be an arts and crafts 
bazaar under a tent in back of the 
Student Union. At a smaller dome 
near the pond, a concert will be 
held during the day. 

Workers say that 25 to 35 men, 
all devotees of Guru Mahara Ji have 
been working on the project. 

WMUA will broadcast the Guru's 
speech live. 



THE SUMMER 



ttiiitl 



EDITORS 



Rudolph F. Jones 



Michael D. Kneeland 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 



Steve Ruggles 



godlike if not some physical 
manifestation of God. 

The Guru-devotees only refer to 
him by his full name — the leader of 
the Divine Light Mission which 
boasts a 5 to 8 million world wide 
membership. Some Guru followers 
will privately admit however that 
the movement has peaked already. 
Peaked or not, the Divine Light 
Mission, followers say, is not a 
religion. "Guru Maharaj Ji is not 
here to start a new religion," notes 
Laura Koppelman, an attractive 
recent graduate of New York City's 
Leaman College and an advance 
person here for the festival. He 
wants to bring everyone together 
regardless of religion or race." 

Recently the Guru has been 
having some difficulty keeping his 
own immediately family together. 
The problem has its roots in family 
history. 

Guru's father Shri Hans Ji 
Maharaj was the former perfect 
master and before he died he 
designated Guru Maharaj Ji, the 
youngest of his four sons, to be the 
next perfect master. 

Now one of the other brothers, 
says he should be the perfect 
master. Followers of Guru Maharaj 
Ji are not concerned with this 
development. They say the brother 
simply does not realize who the 
perfect master really is. 

The title perfect master does not 
mean, devotees say, that Guru is 
incapable of any human faults. 
They say, rather, that he is the 
perfect imparter of knowledge and 
can "reveal what is absolute." 

There are four "techniques", 
Koppelman says, that the Guru 
teaches: 

— Light; the energy inside 
oneself 

— Music; the source of music 
which comes from inside oneself. 
"The Guru lets you know how you 
can hear it." 

— Nector; the sustaining fluid 
inside one's body. It has a distinct 
taste which may vary from in- 
dividual to individual 

— Word; in Koppelman's words, 
"a vibration of God" inside a 
person. It is not a real word and 
can't be described so it is called the 
Word. 

The word Guru may be broken 
into two separate words: Gu means 
darkness and Ru means light. A 
Guru, therefore, is one who can 
take a person from darkness and 
reveal the light, followers say. 

When criticism is leveled at the 
Guru, and that's frequent, it's 
usually directed towards his wealth. 
Devotees donate money to him, 
usually 10 per cent of their yearly 
income. 

So his wealth is considerable. He 
owns many houses (mansions), 
yachts, expensive cars and other 
luxuries afforded to the rich. 

"He's bringing peace to the 
whole world ... to do that he needs 
resources," says Mark Lawson, a 
treasurer of the Divine Light 
Mission. 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoons, and letters represent the personal views of the authors. 



1 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon -Fri. 
p.m. 



8:30 a.m. - 4:30 



Lawson also noted that Jesus 
Christ, when born, was presented 
gifts from the Wisemen. He 
compares that to Guru devotees 
donating money. 

Koppelman says that it is not 
proper to consider how much food 
for the poor Guru's money could 
buy. "Until everyone has an 
elevated conscience, there will 
always be poverty," she claims. 

Other devotees on campus say 
Guru's money, and its resulting 
criticism, have made his a 
household name. 

There are various Indian words 
one might frequently hear this 
weekend: 

- Premie; a person who has 
received knowledge of God that 
Guru Maharaj Ji has to offer. 

-^ Mahatma; a disciple of the 
Guru. Some 2,000 big, they are able 
by "the grace and command" of 
the Guru to give the experience he 
has to offer. 

The Guru was recently married to 
a 24-year old airline stewardess for 
Airlines. She is a devout follower of 
the Guru. 

Since his marriage. Mission 
leaders semi-joke, there have been 
a number of marriages amongst his 
followers. 

The Divine Light Mission is not 
considered by its members to be a 
strict, dogmatic religion; there is no 
doctrine on sex and other subjects 
religions typically address them- 
selves to. 

"Decisions, like marriage," says 
Koppelman, "should come from 
meditation." 

The Guru himself, no doubt, has 
spent considerable time meditatingT 

"Premies, in this century what 
we really need is to recognize that 
truth. But how to? That's a really 
big problem because there are 
many people saying that they 
recognize this truth, they recognize 
this Knowledge. But how to really 
recognize it? We have to go to a 
Perfect Master. 

"Ladies, and gentlemen, this is 
the point exactly with our lives. We 
have all these scriptures, but still we 
have to go to a priest. Why? And 
the priest has to go to a bigger 
priest, and then finally there is the 
Pope. And even the Pope is 
connected with some higher 
power. What is that power? That is 
what we have to actually and 
practically realize within ourselves. 
That power is called God, but who 
is He, anyway? What is that power 
behind Him which is enabling Him 
to do everything? What is making 
Him enough to be called God? This 
is what we have to understand. 

"Many people get confused, 
"Oh, how come he's the Perfect 
Master?" Because he can teach us 
perfectness, that's all, because he 
has perfected that subject. If we 
can understand that little point, that 
really all humanity is missing that 
perfectness, oh boy, I'll tell you 
something. There is going to be 
perfect harmony in this world and I 




Guru Maharaj Ji 



can bet you that. It's just going to 
be beautiful. I can bet you that, no 
doubt, because I know what there 
is going to be if anybody realizes 
this Knowledge, if he meditates on 
it, if he realizes it more and more. 

"I challenge all the intellectuals 
of this world, I challenge all 
scientists of this world to see if they 
can comprehend with their finite 
brains what this Knowledge is, to 
see if they can understand what I 
am talking about. I just challenge 
them to, because they just can't. 
It's an individual experience and 
they have to realize it themselves. 
And then it's just fantastic, it's just 
far out. 

"Many people say, "You are a 
fake. You are antichrist." You know 
what I do? Give 'em a big smile. 
Because, man, when antichrist 
comes on their heads, they won't 
know. He's going to be too 
professional. 

( Continued on P. 5) 




KOPsbJ 

2^1 HPJea:^nt:StM\en5d 





NOTICE: 


Because of 


an unusually high demand, the 


enrollment period for 


payment of the Summer Health 



Fee for students at the University of Massachusetts 
has been extended to July 13, 1974. 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOL^tVcE ^'' 



>\9J X v'wt .li^^''1^>''VV 



UMass students recruited 



by Luis Manuel Medina 

Hampshire Community Action Commission, Inc. (HCAC), have 
recruited 1 1 volunteers from the University Year for Action Program. 

The volunteers will be providing services for up to one year per- 
forming different duties among HCAC's component programs. 

"I think it's very good that the university has gotten together with the 
Federal Government and local community, and attempting to provide 
students, (UYA's), with a real life experience and understanding of the 
community, its problems and its needs", said Austin Miller, HCAC's 
executive director. 

Commenting about the volunteers' arrival, another of the programs' 
director, Federico Brid of the Hispanic Center said the hire of UYA 
students "allow to be carried out some projects which we were not able to 
do before, because of the lack of personnel". 

Essentially HCAC's programs will be providing professional training 



and supervision to the volunteers that othenwise are regular start members 
in the agency. 

David Johnson, Director of the Hampshire Neighborhood Center, has 
a first hand experience with UYA working with HCAC in 1972 and was 
later appointed to its staff. 

He said UYA "is a viable experiencial educational alternative." It is a 
means — he added by which students learn first hand how to serve ef- 
fectively in the community as they receive field study credits from the 
university. 

Talking about his services in UYA he said he started in HCAC, and 
because of his experience decided "I wanted to stay in the Northampton 
Area, and continue working for HCAC". 

UYA Volunteers have started working in different programs such as 
lead poisoning tests, housing, recreation, communications and social 
services. 




David Johnson 



Mt Washington: sure 
ain't no Amherst City 



By MIKE KNEELAND 

Ask a Mt. Washinton resident 
what bethinks of Amherst and he'll 
probably say he doesn't like city 
life. 

Tucked away in the south- 
western comer of the state, the 
town has the distinction of being 
the snr^llest town in Mass. 

Actually, the tiny community 
experienced a population boon in 
theeOs — the population shot up to 
52 from 34. It's no laughing matter 
here to say the cows outnumber 
the people. 

It's about a 60-minute drive from 
Amherst to Mt. Washinton and one 
can count on getting lost. Head 
west on Rt. 1 12, to 20 to 8 to 23 and 
it's somewhere in that area. There's 
a sign which dutifully says eight 
miles to Mt. Washington but 
continue on the same road and 
you'll end up in New York. 

Take a road heading south when 
you hit the N.Y. border and perhaps 
you'll end up in Mt. Washington 
Center, which consists of a church 
and a town hall that's perfectly 
square. 

One look at the Mt. Washington 
bulletin board and you start 
wondering if there's any gun-totin 
billies here for Deliverance. 

Take Harvey Kreidmaker. Harvey 
must like politics. He's the animal 
inspector, field driver, voter 
registrar, and serves on the 
cemetery and ministerial com- 
mittee. His wife Mildred is the ballot 
clerk. 



James Whitbeck is the official 
fence viewer and Harry Garrett sees 
dual service as the tree warden and 
insect pest controller. 

The bulletin board also notes that 
the Mt. Washington Cook Book is 
being assembled and that Vickie 
Whitbeck will donate to the town 
"several copies of her forthcoming 
book 'The Best of Vickie's Kit- 
chen.'" 

Inside the town hall there's a big 
safe which Jesse James would 
have loved. On top sits the official 
town ballot box, about 18" square. 

Having seen the town in five 
minutes, I was on my way out when 
some woman from Penn. stopped 
to ask if I knew the way to New 
Haven, Conn. 

There was a passenger in the 
back seat. He looked like Rod 
Serling. 



IJnderstanding^ 
Wine /^ , 

THE DATING GAME 

You don't have to be an "ex- 
pert" on wine to serve it. Wines 
are made to be enjoyed, not 
idolized and if youjust keep these 
few suggestions in mind, you'll 
soon be pouring with enough pre- 
sence to impress an expert! 



fr^lE)^T TO THE POSr OFFICE -- IN AMHERlE^I 



Dr. testing racial tolerance 



"Have test will travel" could be 
the motto of O.C. Bobby Daniels 
who brings students, teachers, and 
government workers throughout 
the country a sort of mirror view of 
their tolerances and intolerances. 

Dr. Daniels has compiled a list of 
questions into what he calls DTIAI 
— the Daniels Test of Inter-racial 
Apperception and Ideology. As 
director of the Office of Community 
Development and Human Relations 
at the University of Massachusetts, 
he has administered the test to 
UMass students in residence halls, 
and he has packed his 28-minute 
test and traveled in and out of the 
state. 

"Cognitive" multiple choice 
questions about blacks and whites 
involved in American history show 
"awareness, or lack of awareness 
of the contributions of blacks, and 
humanistically oriented whites," 
says Daniels, and a high score on 
these questions predicts a high 
score also on the "tolerance" 
portion of the test. Which proves, 
he says, that "the more we know 





Table wines are "alive" so keep 
them as quiet as possible bet- 
ween store and board — lying on 
their sides to keep the corks 
moist — in a cool, dark, relatively 
dry place. Serve reds at about 65° 
F. "Room temperature" isn't 
what it used to he, so it's OK to 
chill slightly, especially lighter 
types like Beaujolais. Whites and 
roses should be refrigerated for 
about two to three hours- 



about people who are racially, 
sexually, or ideologically different, 
the more tolerant we are. 

One student who took the test 
later wrote Daniels that when 
seeing his own test score indicate a 
low tolerance level, he "felt a lot of 
pain." Such a reaction, according 
to Daniels, is normal because 
people are reluctant to face racism 
in themselves, and thereby take the 
blame for that imperfection. But, he 
says, the cause of racism is not the 
person, but the culture surrounding 
him. "If you can forget the ego 
stuff involved with the taking of the 
test, you can realize that you are 
not actually responsible for your 
lack of awareness. The real culprit 
is the educational system and the 
society which nurtures it." 

He adds that once the test shows 
a person his level of tolerance or 
intolerance, and once the person 
accepts the rating, he can try to do 
something to improve that level, 
and perhaps even join the newly 
emerging "humanistically oriented 
minority." The test grew out of 



—overdoing it will kill the subtle 
flavor of delicate wines like 
Amourose. 

Open reds about an hour ahead 
of time to let them "breathe." 
Most whites can stand about 15 
minutes aeration, too. Except for 
very old wines that tend to throw 
ofT sediment, decanting is really 
superfluous. But go ahead if you 
want to be posh of an evening. 
And for true elegance, serve two 
or more wines with an elaborate, 
multi-course meal. In most cases, 
white before red, young before 
older, dry before sweet, and 
lighter before fuller bodied. 

Most important, remember a 
dinner party is not a tasting 
Don't worry about form, follow 
your own taste and instincts, de- 
velop your own style of 
serving . and enjoy! 



Daniels' doctoral dissertation for 
the UMass School of Education. 

In the past year he has given the 
DTIAI to college and high school 
students, junior high teachers, and 
municipal workers. Results show 
no significant difference Ijetween 
the tolerance levels of whites and 
blacks. 

Daniels considers the test a self- 
teaching tool, because its answers 
show the exam-taker something 
about himself in relation to his 
environment. 



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Wednesday, July 3, If74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pag* 4 



Colonial films to be aired 



Two Colonial Williamsburg films 
on the local artist Erastus Salisbury 
Field wiH be shown at Historic 
Deerfield on Wednesday, July 3. 
"New England Folk Painter" and 
"Around the World in Eighty Feet" 
may be seen at 5:00 p.m. and 8:00 
p.m. in the White Church (Com- 
munity Center) on Memorial Street 
in Old Deerfield. The public is in- 
vited and all are welcome to attend. 

Erastus Salisbury Field was born 
in Leverett in 1805. He studied in 
New York City under the painter 



arKi inventor, Samuel F. B. Morse. 
He painted portraits throughout the 
Connecticut Valley many of which 
are in the collections of local 
historical societies. Field lived from 
1858 until his death in 1900 in the 
Plumtrees section of Sunderland. 



During this period he painted a 
panorama depicting an imaginary 
trip around the worid. This is the 
subject of "Around the World in 
Eighty Feet". Field's entire life and 
work are the subject of "New 
England Folk Painter". 



WMUA has 
job openings 



Local man promoted 




Medieval healers claimed that 
gold fused under certain as- 
trological signs could cure 
appendicitis. 



Mr. Pedro Ayala, a Nor- 
thampton's resident, was ap- 
pointed for New England Sales 
Representative by Easy Records of 
New York. 

Mr. Ayala, who. is a former 
president of Spanish American 
Citizens of Hampshire County, said 
that he will be visiting record shops 
in the area to promote the Spanish 
American owned record company. 



Mr. Ayala said that he grew up in 
Puerto "Hico. He came to Nor- 
thampton In the late '70s. One of 
his daughters Miss Carmen Ayala is 
the former '72 Spanish American 
Queen of Hampshire County. 

UMass students had an op- 
portunity to see Mr. Ayala last year, 
when he brought the Boricuitas 
Band to perform during the Puerto 
Rican Cultural Week. 



WMUA radio has several job 
openings in the News Department. 
WMUA is the student radio station 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

All openings are non-paid 
volunteer positions, the un- 
derstanding being that the prime 
motivation for interest in MUA 
News is a genuine desire to inform 
the public. Several news staffers 
who have worked at MUA have 
now obtained jobs in the 
professional radio world. 

The job involves several hours of 
in-studio preparation for an 
evening, afternoon or nightly news 
spot. MUA newspersons are 
responsible for editing, writing, 
gathering and compiling news from 
various sources. Duties will include 
the presentation of these materials 
in an orderly fashion, along with 
various audio cuts. 









In Central America, gold is 
believed to have a soul. 



OPEN •• 
MorvTri 10-9 
Sat 10-6 



In some parts of India, gin- 
seng leaves are smoked by 
asthmatics. 



Kill-A-Watt 

CONSERVE ENERGY 



Accepted or not for an air spot, 
students will be given all the 
essential technical knowledge 
required for future and alternative 
dealings with the newsroom. Those 
not given an air spot may work in 
other parts of MUA news such as 
covering local and regional events, 
telephone interviews, and the 
taping of distinguished visitors to 
the five college area. 
As for job preference, priority will 

go to: 

— 1) Full-time UMass students 

— 2) University affiliated 
organizations 

-3) UMass grads 
—4) Students of the five college 
area (Hampshire, Amherst, Smith, 
Mount Holyoke) 
-5) All others 

How to go about getting into 
V'/MUA News: 

There will be an organizational 
meeting on July 2 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Campus Center on the Campus 
of the University of Massachusetts. 
The meeting room is CC 174-176. 



^Iso visit 
oup l^ecopJ 

^ / Room 



El 



1%)UTE 9- H/\DLEy 



cosual (Qualify clofhing 

fair prices and 

IKa friend I iee>t 

of service... 



jerseys 



Geailernan 

shirts 

Qftaortedl 
hfxlter teps 



Landlubber 
denim 

Clongos 



s^^ 



Oferolls 

Siz.CS> 



A 



breaKaway 
tops ' 



Levis 

corduroy 
or deriitn 

bellbaftonf\s 



U^HT 



u. 



"A 



Dunham IrulOfers 



Trye 
boots 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page S 



Trustees approve Senate's budget 



The UMass Board of Trustees 
has approved the Student Senate 
Budget recommendations which 
calls for a three dollar increase in 
the student activities tax fund 
(SATF). 

Paul Hamel, Student Senate 
Treasurer, said the increase from 
$42 to $45 per student is mainly due 
to an increase in operation cost of 
the transit service, the funding of 
the Student Organizing Committee, 
and an increase in the use of 
computer operations for such 
details as weekly expenditures. 

Except the Student Organizing 
Committee and Outing Club, Hamel 
noted that almost every 
Recognized Student Organization 
(RSO) group received a money cut 
compared to fiscal year '74. 

Hamel also disclosed there is a 
"move in the senate to set up a 
committee next year to evaluate all 
funded programs and to see if the 
groups really provide a service to 
the students." 

Below, the complete SATF 
budget for fiscal year '75 is listed: 



guru 



(Continued from P. 2) 

"All the people who say that I am 
fake shouldn't bother about me, 
maybe I am fake. Forget about me. 
Talk about Knowledge. Take this 
Knowledge. Understand it. It's 
beautiful. Why do you have to 
consider me? Many people say, 
"Oh, you are fake." Man, the only 
thing I can do is to just give 'em a 
big smile. I can't cry at that because 
what they are talking about, they 
don't know. It's like a cloth mer- 
chant is showing you all the cloth 
for your suit and you say, "Oh, I like 
you as the cloth." He won't give 
you a big smile. More like, he'll 
think, "I better call an ambulance 
and send you to the mad hospital. I 
am not a cloth, I'm the one who's 
showing you cloth." And that's the 
exact condition here. 

"People are saying, "You are 
antichrist, you are this and you are 
that." What shall I tell them, yes or 
no? The only thing I can tell them is, 
"Brother, look for yourself who is 
antichrist and who is not. You 
better treat me as a human, not as 
antichrist." I am a human. They can 
see with their two eyes. And if you 
are human, and if you are a brother, 
please have some love for me and 
consider, as a brother, what I am 
talking to you about, because a 
brother better listen to a brother. 




FISCAL YEAR 1975 SATF APPROPRIATIONS, AS ADJUSTED, FINAL 
FIGURES 



Room to Move 
RSO SA 
Outing Club 
Student Auto Work 
Legal Services 
Senate Transit 



$3,265.00 
213,883.00 
1,934.00 
11,820.00 
29,250.00 
46,185.00 



$7,733.00 

252,389.00 

9,507.00 

8,257.00 

27,450.00 

80,000.00 



$(309.00) 
(12,976.00) 
(3,740.00) 
(5,130.00) 
(1,098.00) 
(20,000.00) 



$7,424.00 

239,413.00 

5,767.00 

3,127.00 

26,352 00 

60,000.00 



$306,337.00 $385,386.00 $(43,253.00) $342,083.00 



PRIORITY NO. 2 

Spectrum 

Collegian 

WUMV 

Index 

Black Mass. Comm. 

Drum 

WMUA 



PRIORITY NO. 

Senate Events 
S.C.E.R. 
Resource Devel. 



PRIORITY NO. 

Gay Womens 

CEQ 

Un.of T.W.W. 

Ahora 

I. P.O.' 

S.H.L. 

Harambe 

Afro-Am 



$14,025.00 
85,150.00 
2,265.00 
51,860.00 
12,390.00 
32,995.00 
49,830.00 



$13,860.00 
82,682.00 
467.00 
49,960.00 
13,848.00 
36,993.00 
39,325.00 



$(693.00) 
(4,134.00) 
(23.00) 
(5,823.00) 
(2,078.00) 
(5,648.00) 
(1,966.00) 



$13,167 00 
78,548.00 
444.00 
44,137.00 
11,770.00 
31,345.00 
37,359.00 



PRIORITY NO. 

Comm. on Pov. 

Boltwood 

Northamhton V. 

JOE. 

N.E.S. 

Belctiertown 

PREP. 



Black Scientist 
BOSS. 



PRIORITY NO. 

Veterans Coal. 
Art Group 
Amateur Radio 
Jazz Society 



$1,650.00 
2,625.00 
777.00 
3,175.00 
8,89500 
1,420.00 



$1,790.00 
2,875.00 
777.00 
3,175.00 
4,545.00 
1,295.00 
1,515.00 



$18,542.00 

$5,540.00 

3,739.00 



$9,279.00 



$15,972.00 

$8,825 00 

8,590.00 

$17,415.00 



2,178.00 



5,020.00 

1,160.00 

430.00 

1,125.00 



$2,178.00 



$7,735.00 



$(289 00) 

• (486.00) 

(70.00) 

(286.00) 

(409.00) 

(117.00) 

(1,515.00) 

$(3,172.00) 

$(3,839.00) 

(8,590.00) 

$(12,429.00) 

$2,348.00 
(1,160.00) 
(47.00) 
(1,125.00) 

$16.00 



$1,501.00 
2,389 00 
707 00 
2,889 00 
4,136.00 
1,178.00 



$12,800.00 
$4,986.00 



$4 986.00 

$7,368.00 

383.00 

$7,751.00 



$248,515.00 $237,135.00 $(20,365.00) $216,770.00 



TOTALS 



$776,825.00 $900,772.00 $(106,589.00) $794,183.00 



$49,990.00 
15,255.00 
30,415.00 



$50,594.00 
23,060.00 
31,120.00 



$95,570.00 $104,774.00 



4,780.00 
6,730.00 
8,555.00 
6,625.00 
839.00 
7,545.00 
6,950.00 



$660.00 

3,135.00 

4,500.00 

11,565 00 

2,625.00 

815.00 

8,155.00 

15,760.00 



PRIORITY NO. 5 

St. Att.Gen. 

usee. 

Organizing Comm. 
Senate Operations 



$42,024.00 

$2,040.00 

2,160.00 

23,995.00 

26,185.00 

$54,390.00 



$47,215.00 

$2,005.00 

3,125.00 

52,670.00 

27,390.00 

$85,190.00 



$(4,534.00) 
2,800.00 
(2,530.00) 

$(4,264.00) 

$(46.00) 

(219.00) 

3,006.00 

(3,609.00) 

(184.00) 

(57.00) 

(1,138.00) 

(9,297.00) 

$(11,544.00) 

$(160.00) 
(1,138.00) 
(7,900.00) 
(2,380.00) 

$(11,578.00) 



$46,060.00 
25,860.00 
28,590.00 

$100,510.00 

$614.00 
2,916.00 
7,506.00 
7,956.00 
2,441.00 
758.00 
7,017.00 
6,463.00 

$35,671.00 

$1,845.00 

1,987.00 

44,770.00 

25,010.00 

$73,612.00 



1 All adiustments are made in accordance with the "PROPOSAL FOR THE 
ALLOCATION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES FUNDS FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1975 WITH TAX ADJUSTMENTS", with the following extra 
provisions, as authorized by the Student Senate, on May 15, 1974, and the 
Student Senate Executive Committee, empowered to act on the Senates 
behalf, as per Chapter 1, Paragraph 3, Section E of the General Laws, on May 

1 That $3,600 00 be appropriated to the Union of Third World women. 

2 That the Student Center for Educational Research be returned to Its 
original amount and appropriated an additional $2,800.00. 

3 That the Veteran's Coalition be appropriated an additional $2,900.00. 

4 That all organizations subiect to adiustment process No. 3, as listed 
under the above stated proposal, shall be further reduced by an additional \ 
per cent. 



"So understand, premies, what 
I'm talking about; understand, 
ladies and gentlemen, what I'm 
talking about. See, if you think I am 
a fake, why? Because I take money 
from you? I don't want it, don't give 
it. I don't want it. What else? What 
else can I say to you, what else can 
I tell you? There is nothing else to 
tell you, it's just gorgeous, it's just 
beautiful. 

"I guess that's as far as I can go 
explaining to you about this 
Knowledge. The rest is up to you to 
understand it. Just try it, please. 
That's all I say. Just try it once. And 
please, a fifteen-year-old kid, who's 
going to be sixteen this December, 
us just asking you to do one thing, 
just one thing, for the sake of this 
whole world. Not for my sake, I am 
fine, I got it, I am meditating on it 
and I am beautiful. Everything's fine 
with me. And once you try it I can 
bet you 900,000 percent you are 
going to like it. You haven't got a 
way out of it. If you really meditate 
on it you are going to like it. It's 
beautiful." 




i'rie C/1PTWM'<; i/1BL€ 



Olfi 

wem 

HAROIOS 



New Location: 
65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 

NEW and USED Clothing featuring the lowest prices 
in town 

.Used jeans, denim jackets, leather jackets, western 
shirts, much more . . . 
New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 
PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

253-5291 

Open Monday Saturday, 10 6 
Friday Nite, till 9 



FLIGHT FACTS 

Did you know thai: 

Flying isn't jusl lor 
the younjj .Allhouuh ihe 
largest number is in the 25-29 
year old bracket, nearly 20 
percent of the private pilots 
qualified for their licenses 
after age 40. About 15.000 
private pilots are over 60 
years old. 

Flying isn't ju.st lor the 
rich. Sixty percent of today's 
private pilots earn le.s.s than 
S20.000 a year 

The cost of learning lo 
fly i.s about equivalent lo a 
winter's skiing or country 
club dues, according lo Piper 
.-Xircrall Corp. 

.\ small Piper single en 
.iine airplane travels Iwo lo 
three times Ihe speed of the 
family automobile and al 1 1 
lo 18 miles per gallon. 

• Around .'^O.OOO women 
now hold private pilot licenses. 

' It takes a minimum of 
40 hours--20 with instructor 
and 20 solo-lo qualify for a 
private pilot's license. 






offirim: (I 



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Ti\n:s 



TOINITE 

Endless Knights 

( eU'brale their F ifth .Anniversary 
With a Keal ( razy Night: ! 

I*riz<'s — hOml — Drink di 



JS DAMON KI).. NOKTIIAMPTON. 5S4-«OS(i 



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SUPPLIES 



All Your TENNIS Needs 



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SHOES 

RESTRINGING 
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Open Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -5: 30, 
Sat., 9 a.m.-l p.m. 
377 MAIN ST., AMHERST, 253-3973 



■4^- 



X 



'fl7?rf 



""MfiKr; 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 6 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 7 



A guide to local entertainment 



Pub (E. Pleasant St., Amherst) - 
If you like beer drinking crowds, 
you'll probably like the Pub. During 
the regular school years this bar 
caters mostly to fraternity and 
sorority students. The crowd, 
during the summer however, is 
more a cross-sectioned group. 
Good variety of weekly en- 
tertainment including Tuesday 
night movies and on oldies night. 
No dress code enforced though 
many people wear clothes other 



than jeans. One dollar cover when 
bands are playing. 

Checkers (University Drive, 
Amherst) — Also under the 
guidance of Pub management, 
Checkers is less popular. Those 
who'd probably go to Checkers 
during the school year would 
probably go to the Pub in the 
summer. No dress code though 
people here tend to wear pressed 
pants and shirts. One dollar cover 
when bands play. 




A peaceful summer's night. 



Come feel the hills and 
valleys of your feet. 



Scholi 



exercise sandals 

Come rest your feet in 
the hollows and the rises. 
Experience the coolness of 
polished beechwood against 
the warmth of bare skin. Feel the 
ittle mound we call the tpe-grip, 
that helps you turn mere steps into a 
beautiful toning and awakening for your 
legs. Scholi. the original Exercise Sandals. 

Red. while, blue, or bone cushioned leather 
strap. Raised heel or flat (bone only). 

Summer Session 
Special 




Now 
thru 
July 13 



Only 



$-749 



List $12.95 



UNIVERSITY STORE 



1 002 



Drake (Amity St., Amherst) — 
The Drake's main attraction is the 
wide variety of beer it sells at 
reasonable prices. Not a bad place 
to get a beer with food other than 
pizza or grinders at night. There are 
more fights here than other area 
bars though they rarely result in 
bloodshed. Crowd is left-wing, on 
the whole, compared to the more 
conservative Pub and Checkers 
crowd. Downstair's bar is the 'pit' 
of Amherst. 

Steak-Out (University Drive and 
Rt. 9, Amherst) - One of the 
classier establishments students 
frequent. Upstairs is a top notch 
restaurant. Entertainment is in the 
downstairs lounge with live rock 
entertainment. Prices for beers and 
mixed drinks are slightly high to 
compensate for no cover charge. 
All in all, a good place to go when 
one wants to escape the college bar 
atmosphere. 

Rusty Nail (Rt. 47, Sunderland) 
— If you like reading Rolling Stone 
magazine, you'll probably like the 
Rusty Nail. Good bands are a 
definite plus here and the crowd 
tends "to get it on." Significant 
number of non-students. Much 
dancing. It takes 15-minutes to 
drive here from Amherst. One dollar 
cover charge usually. 



Rochids (Mountain l-arm Mall, 
Hadley) - One of the more 
remarkable entertainment spots 
ever to hit the 5 college area. 
Seems to belony on New York 
City's upper East Side with all the 
swinging single clientele. Excellent 
discotheque music to augment the 
exquisitely designed bar. Prices are 
very steep. Break out your best 
duds for this place. 

Quicksilver (N. Pleasant St., 
Amherst) - The complete opposite 
of Rochids. If there's an "un- 
derground" spot in Amherst, this is 
it. Where people might discuss 
baseball at the Pub, Alice Cooper is 
more likely discussed here. 
Reasonable prices. 

Bluewall (Campus Center, 
UMass) - The University's own 
bar. Excellent place to go alone and 
bump into friends and classmates. 
Bands are usually good. Beer flows 
like the Nile. If you're planning a big 
drunk, this is a good place to go 



since you can leave your auto at 
home and walk (stagger). TOC card 
needed for students; guests need 
an I.D. 

Top of the Campus (Campus 
Center, top floor) — If you want a 
drink in a quieter atmosphere on 
campus, this is your spot. 
Waitresses, though notoriously 
slow due to small staff, also add an 
extra comfort. Frequently have 
single entertainers, such as guitar 
players. Prices are slightly higher 
than Blue Wall. Bottled beer 
available. TOC card for admission; 
guests need an I.D. 

Rusty Scupper (Rt. 9) - At- 
mosphere here seems to be par- 
ticularly noteworthy: couches, 
wooden framework, and rustic 
appearance. Good prices and 
excellent happy hours. No dancing 
but plenty of friendly crowd 
mingling. Quiet music. Excellent 
dining area seems to be a student 

favorite. Mike Kneeland 



The Castaway's Lounge 






The Hindus believe that the 
use of iron in buildings is 
conducive to epidemics. 



lUe. ':> and HI 
VVhatelv, Mass. 



665-8731 



Will Present 

A 4th July 

Smash Weekend 

With the 

"ENDLESS KNIGHTS" 

KRI. AND SAT. 
The Next Weekend's the Dynamic Group from the City. 

*?OWER-HOUSE" Frid's & Safs. 




SOME DAY 
MY PIZZA WILL COME! 



• . ^W^R^av^a 



}^ I ' ^ ' J ' 



ITT" 



> V,IM 17T'y'>'t ■ ■ ' " > * 



c 

A 

L 
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2 
5 

6 

8 
I 
• 

7 



If you ve ever sung the blues because of slow Pizza delivery, 

take heart. Domino s Pizza promises fast (usually within 

30 minutes) free delivery every time. One reason 

IS the strategic locations of our shops Another is the fact that 

pizzas are our only business. Another is our highly 

trained staff of daredevil pizza-express drivers who know their 

way around. So next time you re hot for pizza, Coll Domino s. 

You II change your tune to Happy Days Are Here Again 

The Domino People are pizza people, Period. 

B DOMINO'S 
PIZZA 



F 
R 
E 
E 



I Expires 
I July 7 

I 
I 
I 

■ 1 Coupon Pizza 



'CLIP OUT! 



50° OFF 

Plus 2 Free Pepsi's 



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L 
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With any large pie 



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.*.•'>' • ■'.*.".'.''.'.'".'.* ».».*.* •.S*,' ' .*,".N*'.V". > 



•••••••>>i4,. 




Vet school not the answer.... 



(Continued from F. l> 

needs. We believe the Governors, 
state education officers, state 
legislators, the New England Board 
of Higher Education, and the Land 
Grant Universities of New England 
can now move to nnake the 
necessary short-term and long-term 
decisions." 

The members of the task force 
are: Dr. Ben R. Forsyth, Associate 
Dean, Division of Health Sciences, 
University of Vermont, Task Force 
Chairman; Dr. Edwin J. Kersting, 
Dean, College of Agriculture and 
Natural Resources, University of 
Connecticut; Dr. Frederick E. 
Hutchinson, Dean, College of Life 
Sciences and Agriculture, and Dr. 
Kenneth W. Allen, Acting Dean, 
College of Arts and Sciences, 
University of Maine at Orono; Dr. 
Mac V. Edds, Dean, Faculty of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics, 
and Dr. William J. Mellen, 
Professor of Animal Science, 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst; Dr. Harry A. Keener, 
Dean, College of Life Sciences and 
Agriculture, and Dr. Winthrop C. 
Skoglund, Chairman, Department 
of Animal Sciences, University of 
New Hampshire; Dr. Gerald A. 
Donovan, Dean, College of 
Resources Development, and Dr. 
Robert W. Harrison, Professor of 
Zoology and Advisory for the 
Health Professions, University of 
Rhode Island; and Donald E. Nicoll, 
Chairman, Joint Operations 
Committee, Land Grant Universities 
of New England. 

Listed below are the eight 
recommendations made by the 
veterinary school task force in New 
England: 

1. We recommend that the 
Presidents of the Land Grant 
Universities of New England 
propose to the Governors of the six 
New England states, other ap- 
propriate state officials and 
legislators, and the New England 
Board of Higher Education that 
steps be taken to negotiate joint 
contracts for up to 60 admissions 
per year for qualified New England 
Veterinary Medical students in 
existing colleges of veterinary 



infirmary 

(In An 
Emnrcnncy) 

(S4)9-2671 



medicine. 

2. We recommend that such 
negotiations be based on the 
principle that contracts should 
provide for fair and equitable 
sharing of expansion costs and 
annual costs of education. 

3. We recommend that contract 
arrangements include cooperative 
programs in research, diagnostic 
services, clinical training, in- 
ternships, residencies, veterinary 
technician training, and continuing 
education. 

4. We recommend that such 
contracts include creative 
arrangements for policy input in 
curriculum and other educational 
and service policies with the 
contracting institutions, affirmative 
action in equal opportunity for 
admissions, and fair and reasonable 
provisions for modification or 
termination of contracts. 

5. We recommend that the 
Presidents urge a target date of the 
fall of 1975 for the admission of at 
least 30 such qualified New England 
veterinary medical students under 
the proposed contracts, and that 
the full complement of 60 students 
per year be reached no later than 
the fall of 1980. 

. 6. We recommend that the 
Presidents urge the Governors, 



other appropriate state officials and 
legislators, and the New England 
Board of Higher Education to 
authorize and undertake studies to 
determine equitable and flexible 
arrangements for the allocation of 
student spaces among the New 
England states, to make recom 
mendations on appropriate 
arrangements for tuition payments, 
loan programs, incentives for public 
service practice, and provision for 
public and private scholarship 
programs. 



7. We recommend that the 
Presidents suggest that the New 
England Board of Higher Education 
re evaluate the alternatives of a 
college of veterinary medicine in 
New England and contracts for 
student places in existing veterinary 
colleges as a long-term solution to 
the region's veterinary medical 
education needs. 
8. We recommend that the 



Presidents take appropriate steps to 
insure a continuing contribution by 
the Land Grant Universities to the 
development of a comprehensive 
program of veterinary medicine, 
animal science, and public health 
services that includes the efficient 
and economic use of New 
England's existing and potential 
educational resources in these 
areas." 







a:{0 



BULK RATE 



Infirmary 

(In An 
Emarganey) 

(54)9-2671 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of 
fering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two-sided 
copies* (d) S5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Vi cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copying onto one side only, add V« cent per copy. 



ITMirSTOSHOP 
THE FINAST WAY 



"* s' /^/fo> 



Fmas. 1/f^/confes 



United States Dept. 
of Agriculture 
Authorized Fbod 
Stamp Store 



FRIDAY, SATURDAY 
SPECIALS 

All Finast supermarkets 
closed all day July 4th 




Shoulder Roast 

Boneless Beef 

A family pleaser that's all juicy tender - eating 
meat Serve with brown potatoes onions and 
all your favorite vegetables for a superb pot 
roast 

London Broil 
Ground Chuck 

^^li^S^lt^f ^^mn Leg Quarters With BacK 
^#lll%#^L^9l I Breast Quarters With Wmp53'ib 

Finest Franks s'^n^js 



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Mr. Deli Specials o1 the Week! 

iled Ham 



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Imported 

Freshly Sliced 

to Order 



Swiss Cheese -poriro ml .49 Kosher Franks 

AvH'iahie in Siote> *iir ^-.ithic [>>i Oepi 




Finast 
Butter 



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pkq 

Quarters 



59 



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HWilh This Coupon j 

ind A Pufcnase ol $5 or Mo'i- j 
Lini' one Coupon | 



japLri^rrrj SUPERMARKETS 



Prices i" Tins Ad EHective July 5 » (I Oriy 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page R 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 9 



Editorials 




Reviews 



^KRaiv^^O 



■U4f MoiM WH(\T me HELL 
^^AM 1 60IM6TO 



Guru Gimmicks 



by Zamir Nestelbaum 

Now that the masses and hordes 
of the devout followers and 
disciples of Guru Mahara Ji, the 10- 
year old Perfect Master, have 
descended upon Amherst, in- 
cluding the vaunted Guru himself, it 
is not just these that are suspended 
in the various heights of their True 
Bliss Nirvana. 

In fact, the various merchants in 
the Amherst Metropolitan Area 
have also reached euphoric levels in 
contemplating the 10,000 or so that 
the Divine Light Mission has hyped 
up for the big event. Theirs is 
almost an orgasmic experience 
rivaling that of the Guru's, but to 
another god, an old and well known 
one — the Great and Good Dollar. 

In browsing around through the 
shops and bistros of the local area, 
we came up with the following 
items not seen in the various retail 
concessions lately and which 
seemed to be aimed at the Big Guru 
Buck. 

Karma Burgers — are available at 
a local hamburger establishment. It 
is comprised of two pieces of melba 
toast with salad dressing in the 
middle topped off with an lOU 
(made out to GuJi) for fifty bucks. 
It is also known as the McGuru. 

Feature Bills are playing this 
week only at a local movie theatre 
aimed especially at the spiritual 
population. Playing on the twin bill 



is Guru Goes To The Beach ana 
Guru Gets Pregnant, both starring 
Peggy Cass and Buddy Hackett. 
Admittedly, these films are aimed at 
the young and immature of the 
temporary visitors. For those of a 
more Hedonistic disposition, there 
is a special late Friday night 
showing of a Guru X-rated flick 
called The Divine Lay. 

Local supermarkets have stocked 
up on a number of items 
guaranteed to draw the attention of 
the faithful. Included on the new 
inventory are Perfect Master Hams, 
and 10 cents off on the new diet 
Guru Wafers, which are put out by 
the same people who marketed Big 
Yaz Bread and Yaz Potato Chips. 
Also on sale are Divine Light 
Bacicscratchers and the special sex 
appeal toothpaste that the Guru 
himself is rumored to have used. 

A local bakery has stocked up on 
an assorted variety of pies — 
cream, pecan, whipped chocolate 
Bavarian, and Bowling Ball pies. In 
case some good natured Zealot 
becomes overly zealous. In- 
cidentally the University Informary 
is on special alert this weekend. 

A local bookstore is prominently 
displaying a new book called the 
Guru Transcripts. It is also rumored 
that Robert Redford has bought the 
screen rights to it and has signed 
Buddy Hackett, Peggy Cass, and 



Caustic Comments 



by Mike Kostek 
KE 32746/ CROWBAR [Epic KE 
32746] time 37:30 

Let's talk about greatness. 
Canada can turn out some real gut- 
grabbers like The Band, King 
Biscuit Boy and Ronnie Hawkins, 
and some lane though tough stiffs 
like The Guess Who and Skip 
Prokop iLignthouse). Be they bum 
or beaut, Canadians seem to have a 
special feel for what they play, a 
certain sense of what's jive and 
what's not. 

Ever since May 9, 1974, a small 
segment of humans have been 
revelling in a passionate state 
bordering on mania. For that is the 
date that this legendary Canadian 
band (and maybe the best band in 
the country), Crowbar, loosed their 
KE 32746. The catalogue number 
title is to let you make up your own 
mind about the contents. 

And what this contams is 
masterfully done rock & roll with 
enticing side dishes, such as a fine 
reggae number. Crowbar plays with 
a flair and expertise that borders on 
the tangible. Everything they do is 
absolutely believable, from teenage 
'million dollar' weekends, police 
retaliation, the awful sin of killing 
time and truckers' tragedies. But 
most of all, as they say, they know 
that "rock and roll is a way of life". 

Consider these immaculate lyrics 
about Joanne & Fast Eddie's rock 
& roll way of life: (we pick them up 
after a brief, rockin' courtship). 
"Joanne and Fast Eddie figured 
they were ready. 

They went to the store to buy a 
diamond ring. 

The store was closed and on the 
way 

Joanne got mislaid. 
So Eddie bought himself a guitar 
And joined a rock b roll band. 
They travelled to the gigs in a beat 
up van, 



They hustled drinks on the brink for 

the men who kept 

one step ahead of the law." 

(Spoken) "And on weekends, Jo 
and Eddie'd hop into his roadster 
and head up the valley where 
they'd swim all day, and after five 
they'd jive. And at night, they'd 
sleep on the beach in each other's 
arms. Joanne would tell her mother 
she was going to a pajama party. 
And Eddie's parents couldn't care 
less." 

This is lovingly spoken over a 
manly, rishing chorus of "Jo & 
Eddie/ They could rock and roll". 

While this album is probably 
weaker overall than their all 
flattening Bad Manors (found in 
reputable cut-out bins everywhere), 
there is a welcome shift toward 
finessing certain areas. Open it up, 
Angelo; this band is fantastic, this 
album is headed for my top ten for 
the year. Are you? 

An all encompassing A. 
CHILD OF THE 50'S' ROBERT 
KLEIN \Brut 6001] time 52:47 
MIND OVER MATTER ROBERT 
KLEIN \Brut 6600\ time 36:05 

You're probably familiar with 
Robert Klein already, whether 
brightening up the moronic 
moments of The Tonight Show or 
at one of his frequent club ap- 
pearances around Boston. He 
belongs in the George Carlin class 
of comin thoughtful, young, 

insightful and satiric. While Carlin 
can zip easily in areas that Klein 
wallows around in, Robert seems 
somehow more dedicated and less 
stoned when on stage. For all 
Carlin's excellence, his air of overall 
spary patronizingness overrides 
everything he does. Klein is also 
harsher with his villains. 

Child Of The 50's was released a 
year ago, and is a gem. The subjects 
range from the horrors of his youth 



Cheetah the Chimp to play certain 
parts. 

A local jewelry shop has on 
special, a sale of Eastern and 
Mystical Jewels. They advertise the 
fact that the jewels are quite small 
and easily hidden in things like the 
lining of vests and insides of books. 
They are especially adaptable, it 
goes on, at airports and border 
crossings. 

A local and rather unscrupulous 
used car proprietor has just in- 
stituted what he calls the "Guru 
Special". For fifty dollars a day, the 
customer receives an engineless 
Volkswagen dune buggy which is 
pulled by 22 Siberian Reindeer. 
"Hail Prancerl Go Dancer!" are the 
code work words which activate 
the 'vehicle' if that adjective can be 
used. 

A local haberdashery is also 
getting into the act stocking a 
number of interesting items. In- 
cluded are True Bliss Berets made 
out of pure seersucker. Inner Peace 
Tweed Suits are a hot selling item 
we're told, only matched by the 
Divine Light Golf Shirts aimed at 
the more worldly of the devout. 

The Guru Aircraft Company has 
set up a temporary headquarters in 
town offering cut rate discounts on 
Lear Jets and Concordian SST's. 
Get High With The Guru AC. is 
their catchy slogan. For every 
dozen Lear Jets the customer 
purchases, we're told, a Mazerati is 
thrown in. 

Maybe these establishments are 
unscrupulous but I recall the P.T. 
Barnum saying about once every 
minute. 




My point of view 



union 
while 



our 



by Stephen Coan 

I can remember about a month 
and a half ago talking to a fellow 
classmate of mine at the U of 
Miami. 

We were at the student 
patio catching the rays 
waiting for a few friends. 

Elena and I talked about 
plans for the summer. 

She planned to work in Philly 
while I told her I was also planning 
to work or if I could somehow 
swing it, I'd go to UMass for the 
summer. 

After a few phone calls and 
several weeks later, Miami said 
okay and the very next day I quit 
my job and left for UMass. 

Upon arriving at UMass I faintly 
remembered that I had to go to 
Boyden to register for my courses. 

Ten minutes after I had walked 
into Boyden Gym I had registered 
for all my courses which at Miami 
usually takes a bit longer. 
My biggest surprise was when I 



asked someone what do I have to 
do next, and a registration worker 
sat down with me and explained 
the rest of the procedures I would 
have to go through. 

Another shock was when I went 
to Webster Hall and the head RA 
warmly greeted me and said if 
there's anything we can help you 
with just let us know. 

I then began thinking to myself, I 
must be dreaming, this couldn't 
possibly be taking place. 

I guess living in Florida for the 
last three years has kept me a bit 
out of the swing for when I heard 
Webster was a coed dorm, our 
definition of coed is two towers — 
one male and female connected by 
a lobby. I then decided that UMass 
was my cup of tea. 

These are just a few of a South 
Floridians first hand observations of 
UMass and by the way Alfredo the 
girls at Pearson Hall aren't that 
fantastic after all. 



Campus Carousel 



by Tony Granite 

Secret Marriages is the rule at 
USoFIa, where officials have 
decided to eliminate the listing of 
marital status in the Student- 
Faculty Directory. 

According to a story in The 
Oracle, student newspaper, when 
the listing appeared for the first 
time, this year, officials decided to 
delete it. No details were cited. 

Impeachment is easier in 
Houston than Washington, ac- 
cording to a story in the TSU 

(Civil Defense drills, commercials) 
to the horrors of his present day 
(New York, commercials). There 
are wonderfully apt recreations of 
'My Little Margie" and "The Little 
Rascals" that border on genius. 
Klein's main talent is his insight lays 
his subjects bare, and eliminates 
them from ever being taken 
seriously in the future. 

Mir)d Over Matter was jcst 
released, and is generally inferior 
(and fifteei. minutes shorter) but 
still a nug ot. 

Child Of The 50's. An en- 
lusiastic A-. 

Mind Over Matter: An unfocused 
B . 

MILK Y W A Y 
MOSES/ T AS A V ALL AN 
PRESIDENTS \ Janus JLS 3065] 
time 46:30 

This Finnish band has its sights 
set on some sort of Mahavishnu- 



Herald, this Spring. 

A whopping 73.4 per cent of the 
Student Senate of the Texas 
Southern U. voted impeachment of 
its president for "apathy to 
students and failure to recognize a 
constitution approved by 
students." 

Headline of the Week appeared 
in The Memphis Statesman over a 



'n roll: "Blue Grass Takes Root." 

Catalog of Manuscript Collections" 
from the Library of Congress. 

Over a period of several weeks, 
601 copies appeared. An em- 
barrassed (some people in 
Washington are) librarian attributed 
the error to a keypunch operator. 

CMU reaction cited in Life: "I 



story indicating that old-time don't know why they even had 600 

copies of the book in stock ... It's 
not exactly bedtime reading." 



hillbilly blue grass music is fast 
replacing countrypolitan and rock 

European cross that makes for an 
interesting 46:30. You know about 
the aggressive blast speed of 
Mahavishnu, and the European 
flavor brought in as always, a 
curious one. These people play with 
their special culture behind them, 
which makes for quite a difference, 
but they also sound as if they didn't 
have enough money to fish out 
enoughYardbirds/Rahsaan Roland 
Kirk/Frank Zappa albums out of the 
import bins. The ones they did 
manage they listened to studiously 
and carefully assimilated. The result 
IS that they sound curiously stilted. 
Originality is not their forte 

Particularly damaging is the 13 
minute "How To Start A Day ', a 
creepy getting up song that drags 
on far too long. On the fine side is 
the first side, "Milky Way Moses", 
"Caught From The Air" and 
"Jelly", featuring some fine playing 



and breathtaking jamming. Out- 
standing is guitarist Jukka Tolonen, 
whose solo album has been an 
import staple and will be reviewed 
here next week. 
A should become very good B. 

HOT AND SWEET/ THE MIGHTY 
SPARROW \ Warners BS 2771] 
time 38:29 

It was close, but The Mighty 
Sparrow won the coveted title of 
"Emperor of Caiso" this year in 
Jamaica for the ninth time. 

My only complaint on this, his 
first 'modern recording' is that a bit 
of the horns have that Van Dyke 
Parks (the producer and Calypso 
enthusiast)/ Hollywood feel to 
them, but this is minor. You'll find 
no album breathing as hot and 
sweet as this. 

A 'this is the real thang' Bt • 



Notes from the undergrad 

The continuing saga of one Edward M. 



by E. Patrick McQuaid 

Someone must have been telling 
lies about Edward M, for without 
having done anything wrong he 
was enrolled at the University 
summer session one fine morning. 
His landlord's cook, who usually 
awakened him each day at eight, 
failed to appear on that occasion. 

He was gently nudged from his 
slumber by a pair of large hands 
belonging to a man of medium 
build and possessing facial qualities 
of carved wood. When he 
demanded the stranger's identity 
and purpose for being in his bed 
chambers at such an hour, the man 
courteously replied that he had 
been registered at "the campus". 
Their brief conversation was 
followed by the gentleman's 
stationing of what appeared to be 
an endless stack of computer cards 
at the end of his mattress. He bid 
him good day and made his 
departure. 

Interesting; one might even call it 
different. A slight annoyance, but it 
did not keep him from breakfasting, 
reading his daily papers, and 
making love to his secretary later 
that evening. 

The sun was well up and shining 
but his room seemed to be in a 
shrouded shadow. 

— Surely this is some mistake. 
Someone at "the campus" has 
made a grave error which calls for 
rectification. I shall attend to this 
immediately and contact this fellow 
OSCAR. He must be a big wheel at 
the school — 

He did not take tea that morning 
and later regretted it when he had 

to purchase a cup from the campus 
coffee shop. 

Upon his arrival he entered a 
building designated to be the 
admissions office. From there he 
was tossed from department to 
department, some holding him for a 



short while as is the common case 
in a volleyball match. 

He decided eventually that in 
order to clarify matters he must 
speak to the man at the top. He 
inquired as to who had any 
responsibility at "the campus" to 
which the pretty, smiling woman 
replied that she did not know. The 
same answer was received from the 
well-groomed, young man located 
behind a desk labeled Information. 

"Orientation and registration are 
in process now. Perhaps there is 
someone there that can help you. 
Anyhow, by the time you come 
back everything should be 
straightened out." 

He thanked the fellow and made 
directions for, of all places, the 
gymnasium. There he encountered 
a crowd of considerable size all 
apparently troubled with similar 
situations to his own. 

A slight tap on the shoulder 
brought his attention around to the 
student standing aside of him. 

"Hi," he whispered cautiousfy. 
"What's your name?" 

He replied extending his hand to 
him. 

"I'm Papyllion; glad to know ya." 
As they shook a well dressed 
gentleman, apparently an authority 
began to speak from the podium. 

"Welcome to the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, whose 
students you are and from which 
there is no escape!" 

As the sun beat down upon the 
students the speaker continued in 
his friendly tone to inform them of 
their rights and what to expect. 
They all moaned painfully when 
they were sentenced to two 
semesters of hard labor in the 
Rhetoric department. When one 
student complained of a conflict in 
classes he was given a full year of 




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Chem 111 at the Goesman labs 
and threatened with a future 
sentence at the Graduate Research 
tower should he step out of line 
again. 

Meanwhile students were 
photographed and assigned a 
number that they must carry with 
them everywhere. Having obtained 
a ceaseless collection of 
paraphanalia, all of which he un- 
derstood nothing, he returned to 
the admissions office. 

"You understand, of course," he 
egan, "I don't belong here." 

"A good number of us don't," 
replied the receptionist. "But it says 
here," and she pointed to a 
computer sheet, "that you are a 
registered student living on 
campus. You also, in fact, have an 
academic warning." 

"But, that can not be ..." 

"I'm afraid it is." 

"No, impossible! You have 
treated me like a fool; like a dog!" 

Such uncommon fate can hardly 
be called tragic because it is im- 
probable to happen. In the spirit of 
revolt that has lead M to cry "That 
can not be" there exists a sub- 
stance of hopeless assuredly that 
"that" is and will always be. 

It is a precise, logical system that 



has crowned us with misfortune. 
Continually trying his actions the 
student is quick to defend himself 
- and of what? 

Our mortal brain possesses a 
weary proness to call fate only that 
which displeases us; wherein 
happiness, likewise unexplainable, 
we attribute to our own credit. 

We must imagine the student 
happy in excepting his position. As 
each semester brings new 



resolutions to his mind he finds 
himself in a vicious circle. Nothing 
is concluded; everything begins 
again ... 



HMast Poliaa 

5-3111 



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SUMIHER IN ^ 
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Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page n 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



WFCR begins 
arts forum 

"Voices in the Wind" premiered 
last night on WFCR - 88.5 F.M. 

It's a new magazine on the arts, 
hosted by internationally 
recognized musician and author 
Oscar Brand. The "Voices" of the 
title will be those of the craftsmen 
end performers, the creators of art 
in the country today, talking about 
their world, as they know it. 

WFCR National Public Radio in 
Amherst will broadcast each one- 
hour program in the continuing 
series Tuesdays in July at 9:30 p.m. 

"Voices in the Wind" will offer a 
forum for artists to discuss what 
they are doing, and why. Each 
program will be something of a new 
creation in itself, made up of 
segments produced by National 
Public Radio member stations, 
freelance reporters, National Public 
Radio reporters," and host Oscar 
Brand. 

The premiere program will open 
with a conversation between ac- 
tresses Bibi Anderson and Vivica 
Lindfors. In a later segment the 
essence of Martha Graham will be 
explored in a miniature portrait, 
opening with her own description 
of modern dance and what she calls 
"the soul's landscape of the 
twentieth century," the portrait will 
be completed by dance critic 
Walter Terry, and Miss Graham's 
biographer Don McOonagh. 

Also on "Voices" will be: an 
interview with a bird fancier who 
believes that birds actually com- 
pose and rehearse their own 
melodies and can be taught to 
expand their repertory; a con- 
versation with operatic soprano Elly 
Ameling; and an explanation of 
American dance by one of its 
progenitors, Agnes DeMille. 

Series host Oscar Brand has had 
a long, varied career in virtually 
every phase of show business. He 
has scripted ballets for Agnes 
DeMille, written television 
documentaries, and composed 
music for Joan Baez and Ella 
Fitzgerald. He has also been 
composer, lyricist, and music 
director for stage productions 
including "Hyman Kaplan" and "A 
Joyful Noise," and is vice president 
of The Songwriters' Hall of Fame. 

For the Public Broadcasting 
Service's recent production, "Male 
Menopause: The Pause that 
Perplexes," he performed his own 
compositions. His commentaries 
for "Voices" will offer personal 
recollections of artists and events 
and synopses of careers and 
contributions of the "Voices" to be 
heard. 

WFCR on the campus of the 
University of Massachusetts- 
Amherst Is a Five-College effort of 
UMass, and Smith, Mount 
Holyoke, Amherst, and Hampshire 
Colleges. 




THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 10 




Iree: 

A Fourth of a Pizza 

on the Fourth of July! 

"£1 





If you don't think Papa Gino is a real Yankee Doodle Dandy, read on: 
Show up at any of the participating units of Papa Gino's between 1 p.m. 
and 3 p.m. on the Fourth of July, and you'll get a Fourth of a Pizza free! 
(That's a whole slice of the best cheese pizza you ever ate.) 

Now, Papa can't afford to do this kind of thing all the time, 
but it is the Fourth of July, and he 
knew you'd get a ^^^ ^ 

bang out of it . ^^^ ^^ ^\ ^^ 



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Tanglewood opens with Boston Symphony Friday 



On Friday evening, July 5, at 7 
p.m., the first weekend prelude of 
the 1974 Tanglewood season 
features soprano Evelyn Lear and 
baritone Thomas Stewart per- 
forming works of Purcell, Vivaldi, 
Beethoven, Haydn and Handel. 
Martin Katz is piano accompanist. 
At 9 p.m. Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in works of Bach, Schutz 
and Stravinsky. The concert opens 
with the Bach Suite no. 1 in C 
Major followed by the Schutz 
Freuet euch des Herren, ihr 
Gerechten, with soloists Kenneth 
Riegel, Seth McCoy and Ara 
Berberlan. The final work of the 
evening is Stravinsky's 

"Pulclnella", Ballet with Song, in 
One Act. Soloists in that work are 
Claudine Carlson, Kenneth Riegel 
and David Evitts. 

On Saturday evening at 8:30 p.m. 
Eugene Ormandy conducts the 
Boston Symphony in an All-Haydn 
program. The concert opens with 
the Symphony no. 88 In G. followed 
by Beatrice's Aria from Cimarosa's 
"I Due Supposti ContI". Nanl's Aria 
from "L'Infedelta delusa" and 
"Nani' e detta" Duet from "L'In- 
fedelta delusa" follow. The concert 
closes with Haydn's Mass In D 
minor "The Nelson". Soloists are 
Evelyn Lear, Thomas Stewart, 
Claudine Carlson, Seth McCoy and 
the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
I John Oliver, conductor. 

On Sunday afternoon, July 7 at 

1 2:30 p.m., Michael Tilson Thomas 

conducts an All-Mozart program. 

[The concert opens with the March 

iin D followed by several Canons. 

The Mozart Requiem In D minor 

:loses the concert and the first 

i/eekend of the 1974 Tanglewood 

season. Soloists for the Requiem 

include Benita Valente, Claudine 

Carlson, Susan Palmatier, Kenneth 

Riegel, Ara Berberlan and the 

Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John 



Oliver, conductor. 

Michael Tilson Thomas, Music 
Director of the Buffalo Philhar- 
monic Orchestra and Principal 
Guest Conductor of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, where he 
received the Bachelor of Music and 
Master of Music degrees. Con- 
ductor of the Young Musicians 
Foundation Debut Orchestra in Los 
Angeles for four years, he was also 
during three of those years con- 
ductor and pianist at the Monday 
Evening Concerts, at which he 
presented premiere performances 
of music by Igor Stravinsky, Pierre 



Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, 
Lukas Foss and Ingolf Dahl, among 
others. Michael Tilson Thomas was 
associated during this period with 
Gregor Piatigorsky and Pierre 
Boulez, serving as pianist in 
Piatigorsky's master classes, 
preparing the orchestra for the 
Heifetz- Piatigorsky concerts, and 
as assistant conductor of Boulez at 
the 1966 Bayreuth Festival and the 
1967 Ojai Festival. During 1968 and 
1969, he was Conductor of the Ojai 
Festival. 

A conducting fellow of the 
Berkshire Music Center at 



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Tanglewood during 1968 and 1969, 
Michael Tilson Thomas was 
awarded the Koussevitzky Prize in 
conducting. During October 1969, 
one month after becoming 
Assistant Conductor of the Boston 
Symphony, at moments' notice he 
replaced William Steinberg when 
he became ill during the Orchestra's 
tour to New York. At the season's 
end, he was named Associate 
Conductor. In February 1972 he 
was appointed one of the Or- 
chestra's two Principal Guest 
Conductors. 



THE HUHGRY-U 



103 N. PLEASANT ST. 



Fast and Courteous Delivery 

256-6350 
256-0611 
253-9080 



During the past few years 
Michael Tilson Thomas has con- 
ducted many of the major or- 
chestras in this country and abroad, 
among them the New York 
Philharmonic, of which he is Music 
Director of the nationally televised 
'Young People's Concerts'. 

Tanglewood is about a 60- minute 
drive from Amherst. Those in- 
terested in attending should take 
Route 9 west to Route 7, head 
south through Lenox and foUow 
posted signs from there. 

For further information, call 637- 

1600 ^=^==a 



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Kast Pleasant St., \mherst Carriage 
Shops. 

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186 Main St. Northampton 586-2552 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page n 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



WFCR begins 
arts forum 

"Voices in the Wind" premiered 
last night on WFCR - 88.5 F.M. 
It's a new magazine on the arts, 
hosted by internationally 
recognized musician and author 
Oscar Brand. The "Voices" of the 
title will be those of the craftsmen 
end performers, the creators of art 
in the country today, talking about 
their world, as they know it. 

WFCR National Public Radio in 
Amherst will broadcast each one- 
hour program in the continuing 
series Tuesdays in July at 9:30 p.m. 
"Voices in the Wind" will offer a 
forum for artists to discuss what 
they are doing, and why. Each 
program will be something of a new 
creation in itself, made up of 
segments produced by National 
Public Radio member stations, 
freelance reporters. National Public 
Radio reporters,' and host Oscar 
Brand. 

The premiere program will open 
with a conversation between ac- 
tresses Bibi Anderson and Vivica 
Lindfors. In a later segment the 
essence of Martha Graham will be 
explored in a miniature portrait, 
opening with her own description 
of modern dance and what she calls 
"the soul's landscape of the 
twentieth century," the portrait will 
be completed by dance critic 
Walter Terry, and Miss Graham's 
biographer Don McDonagh. 

Also on "Voices" will be: an 
interview with a bird fancier who 
believes that birds actually com- 
pose and rehearse their own 
melodies and can be taught to 
expand their repertory; a con- 
versation with operatic soprano Elly 
Ameling; and an explanation of 
American dance by one of its 
fxogenitors, Agnes DeMille. 

Series host Oscar Brand has had 
a long, varied career in virtually 
every phase of show business. He 
has scripted ballets for Agnes 
DeMille, written television 
documentaries, and composed 
music for Joan Baez and Ella 
Fitzgerald. He has also been 
composer, lyricist, and music 
director for stage productions 
including "Hyman Kaplan" and "A 
Joyful Noise," and is vice president 
of The Songwriters' Hall of Fame. 
For the Public Broadcasting 
Service's recent production, "Male 
Menopause: The Pause that 
Perplexes," he performed his own 
compositions. His commentaries 
for "Voices" will offer personal 
recollections of artists and events 
and synopses of careers and 
contributions of the "Voices" to be 
heard. 

WFCR on the campus of the 
University of Massachusetts- 
Amherst is a Five-College effort of 
UMass, and Smith, Mount 
Holyoke, Amherst, and Hampshire 
Colleges. 




THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 10 




A Fourth of a Pizza 
on the Fourth of July! 





If you don't think Papa Gino is a real Yankee Doodle Dandy, read on: 
Show up at any of the participating units of Papa Gino's between 1 p.m. 
and 3 p.m. on the Fourth of July, and you'll get a Fourth of a Pizza free! 
(That's a whole slice of the best cheese pizza you ever ate.) 

Now, Papa can't afford to do this kind of thing all the time, 
but it is the Fourth of July, and he 
knew you'd get a ^^^ ^ 

bang out of it. 




Mountain Farms Mall, Hadley 



N'o Purchase 
cccssatA 



\ 



Tanglewood opens with Boston Symphony Friday 



On Friday evening, July 5, at 7 
p.m., the first weekend prelude of 
the 1974 Tanglewood season 
features soprano Evelyn Lear and 
baritone Thomas Stewart per- 
forming works of Purcell, Vivaldi, 
Beethoven, Haydn and Handel. 
Martin Katz is piano accompanist. 
At 9 p.m. Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in works of Bach, Schutz 
and Stravinsky. The concert opens 
with the Bach Suite no. 1 in C 
Major followed by the Schutz 
Freuet euch des Herren, ihr 
Gerechten, with soloists Kenneth 
Riegel, Seth McCoy and Ara 
Berberian. The final work of the 
evening is Stravinsky's 

"Pulcinella", Ballet with Song, in 
One Act. Soloists in that work are 
Claudine Carlson, Kenneth Riegel 
and David Evitts. 

On Saturday evening at 8:30 p.m. 
Eugene Ormandy conducts the 
Boston Symphony in an All-Haydn 
program. The concert opens with 
the Symphony no. 88 in G. followed 
by Beatrice's Aria from Cimarosa's 
"I Due Supposti Conti". Nani's Aria 
from "L'infedelta delusa" and 
"Nani' e detta" Duet from "L'in- 
fedelta delusa" follow. The concert 
closes with Haydn's Mass in D 
minor "The Nelson". Soloists are 
Evelyn Lear, Thomas Stewart, 
Claudine Carlson, Seth McCoy and 
the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
John Oliver, conductor. 

On Sunday afternoon, July 7 at 
2:30 p.m., Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts an All-Mozart program. 
The concert opens with the March 
in D followed by several Canons. 
The Mozart Requiem in D minor 
closes the concert and the first 
weekend of the 1974 Tanglewood 
season. Soloists for the Requiem 
include Benita Valente, Claudine 
Carlson, Susan Palmatier, Kenneth 
Riegel, Ara Berberian and the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John 



Oliver, conductor. 

Michael Tilson Thomas, Music 
Director of the Buffalo Philhar- 
monic Orchestra and Principal 
Guest Conductor of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, where he 
received the Bachelor of Music and 
Master of Music degrees. Con- 
ductor of the Young Musicians 
Foundation Debut Orchestra in Los 
Angeles for four years, he was also 
during three of those years con- 
ductor and pianist at the Monday 
Evening Concerts, at which he 
presented premiere performances 
of music by Igor Stravinsky, Pierre 



Boulez, Kariheinz Stockhausen, 
Lukas Foss and Ingolf Dahl, among 
others. Michael Tilson Thomas was 
associated during this period with 
Gregor Piatigorsky and Pierre 
Boulez, serving as pianist in 
Piatigorsky's master classes, 
preparing the orchestra for the 
Heifetz-Piatigorsky concerts, and 
as assistant conductor of Boulez at 
the 1966 Bayreuth Festival and the 
1967 Ojai Festival. During 1968 and 
1969, he was Conductor of the Ojai 
Festival. 

A conducting fellow of the 
Berkshire Music Center at 



Tanglewood during 1968 and 1969, 
Michael Tilson Thomas was 
awarded the Koussevitzky Prize in 
conducting. During October 1969, 
one month after becoming 
Assistant Conductor of the Boston 
Symphony, at moments' notice he 
replaced William Steinberg when 
he became ill during the Orchestra's 
tour to New York. At the season's 
end, he was named Associate 
Conductor. In February 1972 he 
was appointed one of the Or- 
chestra's two Principal Guest 
Conductors. 



During the past few years 
Michael Tilson Thomas has con- 
ducted many of the major or- 
chestras in this country and abroad, 
among them the New York 
Philharmonic, of which he is Music 
Director of the nationally televised 
'Young People's Concerts'. 

Tanglewood is about a 60- minute 
drive from Amherst. Those in- 
terested in attending should take 
Route 9 west to Route 7, head 
south through Lenox and foMow 
posted signs from there. 

For further information, call 637- 



Under 11 billion sold 



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259 Triangle St. Amhers 549-2610 
186 Main St. Northampton 586-2552 






Wcdntsday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 12 



All Stop &. Shop stores open every morning at 8^ A.M^CJojsedj^TjiUj-s._July^^^^ 

Drink 111 f^L^-* Butter kU i\ .^^ Ice ISjl 

ID ^p*^.!!?. ,rB¥.!S2G"H|U ^^-sT CreamUil 

m^m2tiW-^ - .ut'*'* '. LB PRINTS ^^ ^^ 24* -<: 1.-^ MERIT -ASST FLAVORS ^^^^ 




. _ ASSORTED 
l^^^ FLAVORS 
iiV--'' 46 02. CAN 

WITM Tns COUPON *N0 * »5 PUWHASt 
Good Men July I - SjI July 6 - Limit o« cm mi cusion'e 



rfS AA 93 SCORE 
,T^' 1 LB PACKAGE 
,uTrt»J 1, LB PRINTS 

WITH TMlS COUPON AND » J6 PU«CMAS€ 
Good Mo" July ' - S»i Jv'y 6 - I -^ 1 o-« 5»J 0«' Ci.sro»>»' 



'245-: 



*:IH This CCjPIN »N0 « St P-KC^tSt 
•CoMMo" Ju'> ' - Sji Ji., 6- 1. -• 5-e :«•':- 3»' c-vo^ei 



I 

FREE!ii 

Stop & Shop ^1 

FROZEN - 6 OZ CAN :^ I 

i ^ -X Lemonade »» g| 

I <-^ y*iTM tMiS COUPON «N0 * »» PuKMASI ;;JS I 

■■- CoodMo" July 1 - S*i July i - L " I o« "" »•' "•••'^ "''2' 



^ G<»4M.n July.-s;. Juiy«-L.m,ton.c.n„,cus,o.... :^'^^->: Oooo Mo" Jul, . - S.i J.., 6 - L -> I o-. ,.j or c.W^ . ^ : - ^ Oooo MO. Ju> ' - iJi "'•• V/. .;//.',, .'i^-i; A » -<-| I I C . t t < M M I ( M < I I I M ( U U tUSflBl 

^— — — ^ — — — — — — — ^ — -•-" — ^ — -'■■■■~"~~~^^"~"~^""""^'"~ "*"""^^J~2^r~ "a"" dllTcouponTmay be redeemed with one $5 purchase ^^ ^^ 

Get your Siii> & ShoiMrvvwm 

great holida^ cookf out! 



Great cook-outs start with great food — like the high qual- brands. Among the many fine brands is our own Stop & 
ity food we bring you at Stop & Shop. Great beef, farm- Shop brand — more than 1000 products, laboratory tested 
fresh fruits and vegetables, yummy baked goods, top tomeethighestqualitystandards! And they cost you less! 

''Ham it up" with this delicious mini-pricing' budget stretcher! 

iBodlced Hams 




Plan on several great 

meals from this lean, 

flavorful ham. Ideal 

tor a family Sunday 

dinner or a backyard 

picnic, with Stop & Shop 

potato salad, cole slaw and 

B-B-Q chicken. 




Shank Portion 

(WATER ADDED) 



■iTfBM Offff '0' »llf nol 

ivi>iantt ir cj«t lot) •' 

ttothtt rctair tftaitn 

or wtioieultrt 



Fully Cooked Hams""^^.'^.«'*.?o'?j'°'^ 58' Ham Steaks ^w/^i.^^s" ^F 

"Quality-Protected'' Beef Naturally Aged For Tenderness! 

^^^/^ CALIFORNIA ^ ^Pj^ ^^ ^ 

diuck Steak 

No other supermarket in America, not one. has ^^^H^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ 
the meat preparation facilities to offer beef con- ^^^^^^^B^^^^^^^^J^w 
sistently good as our "Quality-Protected" beef. It's ^^^^^^^^^^M ^^^^ 
beef that's naturally aged for tenderness and flavor in our own spotless 
meat plant. Every cut is tender, juicy, and flavorful. 




Rib Steak-"Ouarrty-Protected" "■ n?« 
Boneless Chuck Steak M'? Top Sirloin Steak 

Summertime Cookout Favorites! 

Italian Sausage QQl 

PRIMO BRAND - HOT OR SWEET ^^ ^^ ^0 ID. 

Lean Ground Beef 




$169 



1 




Patties 



'Simply Super lean ground beet 
IS not less than 76°o lean. 



Available m stores with pattie machines 



$119 

Alb. 

Our own delicious. White Gem-L,S. Grade'^A'' 

Chicken Breasts 78! 

49« 



Frozen Meats, 

Maid Rite Veal Steak 99^ 



CHOPPED & CUBED -fOOZEN 



$109 



'1 



'1 



$199 



'1 



WHOLE OR SPLIT 



Pepper Beef Steaks 

MAID RITE - I lb PKG - CHOPPEI 

Cubed Bee! Steaks 

MAID RITE - 1 7 oi PKG - FR 

Ctiicken Breasts 

WEAVER DUTCH FRYE - liD 6 oi PKG 

Ctiicken Drumsticks T 

WEAVER DUTCH FRYE - 1 lb 8 02 PKG 

Armour 59 b Turkey 69'. 

LITTLE ROTISSERIE 

Fried Ctiicken .v^r '1" 



Chicken Wings 



WHITE 
GEM 



Only Stop & Shop has meaty delicious White Gem chicken 
parts. These are U.S. Grade A, gov't, inspected chicken. 
Top with barbecue sauce for delicious eating. 



41b. 



Iranks^^ 



STOP & SHOP 
PICNIC PAC 

Big value (or the whole gang! Don t lorget the rolls. 

Switt Premium Canned Ham - 31b. ^3^0 - 51b. ^^^ 



{rMMfrmd DMHIM SMMtt]] 

Armour Star Bologna 99! 

Weaver Cooked Chicken Roll „' 75* 

Polish Style Loaf colu«bi» gem ^j' 99c 

American Cheese ,c 55* 

Imported Polish Pickles '"^'us f„ 79* 




C 



€?oods/rom our summer ^fo/hn. 

^ IP. lOlSlO WQldU Qi^aiity ingredients Osf 

2 LB. MACARONI SALAD OR 2 LB. COLESLAW 

Cooked Chickens-Roasted or B.B.Q. Style -^^ 79' 

r. 79' 



AVAILABLE IN STORES WITH A SERVICE DELI 

WHITE GEM 



Roasted Turkey Breast 

Glazed Imported Danish Ham 



S[7 Mini-PrtcMi FishSptdajt 

Turbot Fillets 

Cooked Fish Cakes 
Medium Size Shrimp 
Neptune Clams Casino 
Matlaws Stuffed Clams 



FROZEN 

T»5TE OSf* 
I LB PACKAGE 

FROZEN 



16 ' 

V4' 89* 



Delicious' 



«' 



69' 



A Sensational Mini-Prirpd^ Special! 

Santa Rosa Plums 

FROM CALIFORNIA 



4w 



Peak of the season . . 
great for picnics and snacks 



1889 



I iiiii»fricttinintwdii~] 

Flavored English Muffins 

STOP 4 SHOP - 11 02. Pkg of ^A^Q 

Cheddar Cheese. Cinnamon Raisin. ^%l 
Bacon or Blueberry Flavored ^3^0 

Buttertop White Bread 

STOP • SHOP 0^ mm 

SLICED ■/ ,e„, )■ 

A mmi-priced' buy enjoy the w^ Loave« I 
llavor wil^out sacrificing quality ^B I 

Stop & Shop Buttermilk Bread 3 ^V" *1 
Daisy Countrystyle Donuts ;:,'o°f'6 53* 

Pl«lN 01 CiNSAMO". 

Blueberryor Peach PieViTVp:? 79* 
Strawberry Rhubarb Pie T,*p':" 69* 
Stop & Shop Brownies ,^:?;fiK%ir 65* 
Stop & Shop Coconut Cake %" 69* 




starts Monday. July 1 - Saturday. July 6 

Bird's Eye Awake 

VHB Mini priced- to Qi?o/$l 

,,_^- - save you money |^ Cj^s | 



Hawaiian Punch -Red '^.°„' 39* 

Swanson Chicken Dinner ' ,^,°' 69* 

Shoestring Potatoes sumjimbwhd «,»' 69* 



'pV; 99* 

k"' 59* 



Stop & Shop 10 Pack Pizza 
Mrs. Paul's Onion Rings 

Sparkool Assorted Drinks 

8 f^ M 

79* 



LemonLime RaspbcyLeiron Fruit 
Punc^ Grape Dfinh or Orange Drmk 



Taste O'Sea Fried Clams p." 

French Fried Shrimp '«te o se* 



Chock ' o'^ Nuts Pound Cake V.' 79* 



Birds Eye Cool Whip 



Stop & Shop Choc-lit Covers .f.'rZ 99* 



Pkg 

16 0. 
Pwg 
10! 
ConI 
)unl 

35 oj Pkg 



io, ggc 



"" 55* 



XL 



^f Sour Cream 4i;<: 

01*4/ <P 16 02 CONTAINER IW 

Great with baked potatoes Mmi-pnced" 

100% Valencia 
dninge Juice 3£;n 




STOP & SHOP 



Buttermilk Biscuits t'^^Ts^o'^ 2 pV,', 25* 

79* 
59* 



B 0; 
Pk, 
1 It) 
Pkj 



59* 
4.;.:^ 89* 



'0( 

Can 



SEALTEST -ASST FLAVORS 

Delicious for diet or dessert 



Swiss Cheese Slices stop » shop 
Blue Bonnet Soft Margarine 
Mrs. Filberts Margarine auAmtHs ;,'5 49* 
Reddi Whip Whipped Cream 
Borden Shakes - Asst. Flav. 

Ligbt'n Lively Yogurt 
3 - 89' 

X[ M Your Slop I SAoDswom J 

B.C. Orange-Apricot Drink '^.V 39* 

Gino Spaghetti Sauce m^hX '?.! 69* 
Stop & Shop Spaghetti Sauce '];: 69* 

ME«T MEt'lESS on MUSHROOM 

Ocean Spray Cranberry Cocktail *|,r 69* 
Stop & Shop Potato Chips 
Kraft Barbecue Sauce 
Stop & Shop Mustard ,l'^,'X^:, VJ 15* 
Gloria Spanish Stuffed Olives 'fj; 45* 
Whole Kosher Dill Pickles T»t!.r 49* 
9" Paper Plates - 100 Count T;;!.r "'« 89* 
Vlasic Relish ^:11:,,T,hT. ToT??, 4 -« '1 
Vlasic Kosher Dill Spears "„?' 65* 

Cliquot Club Beverages 3 Bti> 89* 

«SSOf»TED flAVOKS 32 o; NO lETURN BTIS 



Si' 69* 
1,?' 59* 



^^ ^N^^^^v I^N^^^V ^^^^^HW • ^^^ ^^^Wj ^^^PW I 

Zl Baby Shampoo 59' 

^,1 STOP & SHOP - 16 0/ PLASTIC BOTTLF 

"^ Sure Deodorant 99' 

REGULAR OR UNSCENTED - 9 ox CAN 



1G"x 17" Double Hibacbi 

T 

30 qt. Styrofoam Cooler 

Big 30 qt capacity Kiaps picnic foods Ofl^ 
and beverages cold for hours g g 




FOUR GRID 
ADJUSTMENTS 
Low mini-price 



STOP & SHOP in HADLEY-/UIIIH£RST Route 9 at the Hadley-Amherst Line. 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m., Mon. - Sat. 



vyedne*d«Y. Ju'V 3> ^V^ 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Getting involved in media 



xm 



m 13 



ByWMPandBNS 
The Women's Media Course at 
the Southwest Wonnen's Center 
started out as a way for 22 women 
to come together to leam radio 
skills and theory and to produce the 
weekly Women's Show on WMUA. 
Always stressing that their goal was 
the liberation of women and all 
oppressed people, they produced 
such shows as women in film and 
theatre, women as workers, UMass 
secretaries, women's image in 
popular music. Wounded Knee 
trials and changing attitudes 
toward motherhood. Women's 
shows tried to blend music, talk and 
poetry into a truly educational and 
spirited hour. 

By the end of the spring the 
women in the course knew that if 
the voices and perspective of 
women and Third World people 
were to t>e heard throughout the 
day at WMUA, not just in specific 
time slots, the media groups would 
have to have some decision making 
power at the station. During this 
year there had been no women or 
black people with a vote on the 
management board at WMUA, 
which still holds true for vast 
numbers of mass communication 
centers through the country; 
consequently the programming and 
station decisions have not truly 
been representative of and 
responsible to the community the 
station reaches. 

Black media organizations have 
been working energetically 
developing resources and op- 
portunities for Third World people 
in the fields of media and broadcast 
communications. The Black News 
Service along with other Third 
World Media groups are en- 
couraging students on campus to 
become involved in the many 
activities and learning skills 
programs that are offered. 



DISCARDED aluminum 
beverage cans are collected 



Traditionally, Black people have 
been given the back door treatment 
when applying for media op- 
portunities. The Third World Media 
groups see that it has become time 
fo Black people who are interested 
in communicatbns to take full 
participation in the resources and 
media operations such as WMUA 
radio and the So/stice newspaper. 
Only by doing, will the overdue 
goals be accompNshed. 

In the final weeks of school, 
Womerv's Media Project people and 
members of the Third World Media 
groups started meeting with 
WMUA management board and 
Student Senate representatives to 
set up new guidelines for the 
station and implement a firm Af- 
firmative Action program. Some 
changes have been made: The 
station has agreed to work for a 
non-racist, non-sexist news service 
that reports on people's struggles 
against injustice an inequality. The 
station has agreed to help set up 
educational workshops for the fall 
for d.j.'s and news people to raise 
consciousness about how media 
can either perpetuate or combat 
stereotypes. They have agreed to 
restructure the public affairs 
position so that the Women's 
Media project could have decision 
making input and start producing 



their new show called We the 
People which is aired weekly. 

Being student run and non- 
commercial there is endless 
potential for WMUA to continue to 
grow into a truly progressive, 



responsive and exciting radio 
station, but many changes still 
nxjst be made. 

All progressive p>eopie are 
urged to come down to WMUA 



or 545-2883 or Black News Service, 
New Africa House, 545-0794. If you 
wish to take part in implementing 
any of the above projects. Taking 
control of the media means taking 



contact We the People aft 545-287^ control of our lives! 



hi THr BLUEVVALL <AfBrEHiA 




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receive about 15 cent.s a 
pound from . . . 



STEAr 
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Summer 

En terta inment 

Wednesday Friday & 
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HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY, MONDAY ft 

TUESDAY 

Includes Salad Bar ?^«' 

STCAr 
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Corner University Drive and 
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15 E. Pleasant SL 

(N«KtT«Tlicrub) 



OTHER STORES 



ALBANY, N.Y. 
SCHENECTADY. NY. 
GLEK FALLS. NY. 



PITTSFIELO, MASS. 

COLONIC. N.Y. 

UTICA, N.Y. 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 14 



Area residents petition U.S.S.R. 



On the occasion of President 
Nixon's trip to the Soviet Union, 
and in response to an urgent appeal 
to the West by ten Soviet 
dissidents led by Andrei Sakharov, 
nearly three hundred residents of 
the Northampton -Easthampton- 
Amherst area have signed a 
statement of solidarity with the 
nx>vement for political freedom in 
the U.S.S.R. Sakharov is now on 
a hunger strike in Moscow to alert 
world opinion to the plight of 
Soviet freedom fighters. The 
statement demands: 



Computer aid 



A computer will be a teacher's 
aide this summer in a grammar 
review course offered by the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

Beginning Monday, July 1, and 
continuing each Monday evening 
from 7 to 9 for seven weeks Dr. 
Paul Milenski and Mr. Joseph 
Auciello will teach "Review for the 
CLEP English Exam: A Computer- 
Assisted Workshop." College credit 
is given students who successfully 
complete CLEP exams, and the 
review course at UMass is designed 
to help students pass one in 
English. 

During each class, there will be a 
lesson in grammar and then a test. 
At the next class meeting students 
will receive computer print-outs 



1. That the GULEG AR- 
CHIPELAGO be published in the 
USSR and be made accessible to 
everyone in the Soviet Union; 

2. That archrival and other 
materials which can give a full 
picture on the activities of the 
Cheka, the GPU, the NKVD. and 
the KGB be published; 

3. That there be established an 
international civil tribunal to in- 
vestigate the crimes which have 
been committed. 

4. That Solzhenitsyn be 
protected from persecution and 



with corrections of their answers 
and computer reasons for the 
corrections. The computer will save 
teacher correcting time and give 
the students the benefit of a side- 
by-side comparison of the incorrect 
and correct sentence structure 
under study, according to Auciello. 
He developed the computer- 
assisted program while working as 
a civilian for the New England 
Education and Training Service at 
Pease Air Force Base in New 
Hampshire last year. 

The workshop class will meet in 
Herter Hall room 227. Further in- 
formation may be obtained from 
Jim Tepper at the UMass Division 
of Continuing Education, 213 Hills 
House North. 



Growth workshop 



Personal Growth Through Bodily 
Expression will be offered as a 
summer workshop. It will be 
designed to explore the body as a 
means of expression and com- 
munication. One ms^or focus will 
be: the body as a source of artistic 
creativity. 

The workshop, sponsored by the 
Summer Arts Institute of the 
UMass Division of Continuing 
Education will be held at the 
Bowditch Lodge, near the 
University stadium, on July 1, 2, 8, 
9, and 11 from 2:» to 4:». The 
instructor will be Varda Dascal. 

Ms. Dascal has studied and 



worked in Uruguay, Israel, Brazil, 
France and the United States. 
Through the Division of Continuing 
Education she has taught courses 
in painting, creative movement and 
swimming. 

Anyone interested in their own 
personal growth through bodily 
expression or who wish to teach it 
may register for the workshop. 
Participants should dress com- 
fortably in order to allow freedom 
of movement. 

For more information contact 

Continuing Education at 315 Hills 
North, UMass. Telephone: 545- 
3440. 



Help us help you. 
Use Zip Code. 

\bur Postal Service 




The 
Rusty IVail Inn 



TOMTK 



JILY 4th 



p resell t.*i 



REAL TEARS 



JOH!% LEE HOOKER 



FRIDAY. JILY.^-SINDAY. JILY 



FAT 



MONDAY. Jl LY 8 



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Tt KSDAY. Jl LY 9. and WKDNESDAY. Jl'LY lOth 

Outer Space 

Kte. 17. Sunderland 665-4937 

Take Rte. 1 16 north, take left after Tennis Academy and 
follow to end. Take another left. 200 yards and you're 
there! : 



that he be given the opportunity to 
work in his native country." 

The local effort was part of a 
national one which also sent a letter 
to President Nixon asking him to 
"reverse his policy of non- 
interference in the so called internal 
affairs of the Soviet Union, when it 
concerns denial of human rights." 
The group said that "increased 
repression of Soviet dissidents and 
Jews can only be avoided if 
President Nixon links trade con- 
cessions and economic assistance 
to the Soviet regime with freedom 
of emigration and toleration of 
human rights in that country." 

The letter was signed by many 
nationally prominent personalities 
such as Hollywood star Dustin 
Hoffman, civil rights and Social 



Democratic leader Bayard Rustin, 
AFL-CIO Vice-president Albert 
Shanker, authors Norman 
Podhoretz and Paddy Chayevsky. 
The campaign, initiated by Social 
Democrats, USA, has received 
widespread support nationally, and 
in this area was endorsed by the 
Committee For Human Rights In 
The Soviet Area. The Committee 
has been carrying on a vigorous 
effort locally, whi'.h included a 
number of public meetings, one of 
them addressed by an exiled 
Russian dissident who was a co- 
worker of Sakharov in the freedom 
fight, and numerous other in- 
formational activities. The work of 
the committee has been beamed to 
the iron curtain countries by Radio 



Free Europe and has appeared in 
the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD. 



HADLEY 

Dri¥e-ln Theatre 

!t 9 Hadley 




McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte. 9) 
Hadley, 584-2277 

CYCLE REPAIRS 
All Makes & Models 
Parts & Accessories 

Authorized 



c 




Dealer 
Iti 
'Motorcycle Pick-Up Service' 



Closest Bike 
Shop to 
U. Mass 




Sunday Evningt 

with • 
d9Hclou9 dlnnmr 

at t/i« 

Eating Place 

and a 

fina faatura film 

at tha 



CAMPUI 
^cttoHaj 123 



With every full dinner. II 
choices (except Dclmonico 
steak.XttheJamcaH McManue 
eating place on S«MMlay evening*. 
• free past will be given to the 
feature film of your choice at the 
Campus Cinema* 1-2-3 Then, 
afttr the ahow. yoti can return 
wUh your pact itub to McMonua 
tor a rt/rt«tiing Ice cream cone 
(rtg $Ut) abaolutely FREE 

one drive . 

on* porhlnc tpoce. 

one price DM plue lax 

for on* compi*!* and r«la<mf 
»v9nit\g 

Each Pm« I« Valid Only On 
Data Stampad 

ZAYRES SHOPPING PLAZA 

__ Rf . 9 Hadldy 





Shown 

First 

At 



PafantoufM Pctufes p*ese*Hs 



"The Friends Of 
Eddie Coyte" 



Jilchuni Boyle 



Mon & Tues. 
DATE Couples '2 Price 
NITE: Guy 8. Gal 




Capture The Flavor 
of Old Deerfield 

& Colonial 
America at the 



The Gables Olde Taverne 



BROIliP U¥E LOBSTER SPECIAL 

Lobster, Toss Salad, Rotate, Homemade 

Rolls, Coffee 

$4.9S 



PfU9f 00/f 

BOURMET emit RARE 

Home Made Clam Chowder 

Little Neck Clams or Stirimp Cocktail 

Steamed Clams Broiled Lobster 

Salad - French Fries— Rolls - Butter 

Dessert — Coffee 

S6.9S 



p«W 



Syie 



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Scallops Haddock 

Shrimp Baked Stuffed Clam 

Salad French Fries 

Rolls - Butter Coffee 

$3.95 



•* fif// eogfn Phntrt ihrf $f ^3.00 

• Batl^UifS ,''*^\"''*"9 - Roast Turkey, Hot Baked Ham, Sliced Roast Beef 

Lobster Newburg, Swedish Meat Balls, Celery and OliveV Mom!: 
Baked Beans, Baked Ravioli and Cheese Potato To^^rtr^n 
Fresh Salad, Dessert, Coffee, Rolls Butter ^" 

• EnhrhinmiHt T^eiiip - S$hrd9fi For dance and sing along Good rimes 

4* 



THE GABLES OLDE TAVERNE 



665-4643 



f'JirNoJfh VmUeTorigr-" "^^ ' '"'' '» '" ^-♦'' «=>-- 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Woman sought by SOP 



Pa9« IS 






• • • 



The Student Organizing Project 
is seeking Third World and wooden 
undergraduates for summer in- 
ternships with the Project. The goal 
of the SOP is to organize student 
activism in the university. To this 
end the staff will work together to 
identify and research issues which 
are of importance to students. 
Work is underway in the following 
areas: students and collective 
bargaining, the potential for 
student-run and owned 

cooperatives and services, 
students' role in university decision 



making, problems of student 
workers, student legal rights and 
other areas of concern to students. 
Students working with the Project 
vvill do research, office work, and 
aid in developing a strategy to 
encourage student activism in the 
university. 

Qualifications include: relevant 
research experience, office skills. 



organizing experience, and an- 
ticipated student status in the fall 
semester. Student interns will be 
paid 50.00 a week. Applications are 
available in the Student Organizing 
Project offices, 428 Student Union, 
and must be returned by Thursday 
July 11. Students will work July 15 
through August. 



i ACADEMY 
: [t MUSIC 

• i NORTHAMPTON 



ArTHP:(...\'rp;s 



Come Catch Butch 
& The Kid At: 
7:00 & 9:00 



NORTHAMPTON MASS 5848435 

a • • 




NOW SHOWING AT CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 

RT 9 HADLEY IN ZAYRES SHOPPING CNTR. 256-6411 





BUTCH &THE KID ARE BACK! 

Just for the fun of it I 

"BUKH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID" 

NOW SHOWING EVENINGS AT 7 :00& 9:00 
and MONDAY & TUESDAY are DOLLAR Nights! 

'■■ ■■■ ■ mmwwr 



AMHERST CINEMA 



Not that it matiers. but most of it is truel 

20th CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS 

PAUL NEWMAN 
ROBERT REDFORD 
KATHARINE ROSS. 

BUTCH CASSIDV AND 
THE SUNDANCE KID 



At7:00&9:00 



PiOwMNy the I 




FRIDAY, JULY S 

MIDNIGHT 

ALL SEATS $1.50 

(STUDE.NT CA.HDS WILL BE HOMOHSD) 

SATURDAY, JULY 6 

2:00 P. M. 

ALL SEATS $1.00 

ON STAGE 



THE 

MYSTICAL 

WORLD 

OF 




SIDDHAKTHA 

ANOVELBYHERIVIA^^ HESSE / 
A Fi LM BY CONRAD ROOKS 




iVOLCANE 



Tmaster magician 



ILLUSIONIST 



ir- 



THE REINCARNATION OF 
THE GOLDEN DAYS OF MAGIC 



FULL STAGE PRODUCTION 



MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



BAPLANDS 



f^dA Q1J%T MO, NfAiN fARMS MAI. 

•JO"* zj ^ o o HO '» • -.*;k(» m*s\ 



^^Impossibly 
beautiful to the 
eye. Visually 
exquisite." 

—BERNARD Onew. Qtnntti N»mt Sarviet 

I filmed with rare beauty 
on location in India. 

A BEAUTY ^_,,^ 
UNSURPASSED^ 

A FAME , pp. 
UNEXCELLED 




M 19S9, A LOT OF PEOPt£ 
WERE KIUING TIME. 
™ KIT WAS _Jk. ^ 



THE 
EXORCIST 



KILLING PEOPLE. 



Wed. & Thors. 

2:00-5:45-8:15 

Twi-LiteHr., 5: 15-5:45 



STEUE DUSTin 

imcQUEEn HOFFmim 
PRnLLon 



PG 



TWO MEN 

\/VlTK NO" » INO iN ( C )Mf'AOt\ 

BLIT AVyiLL^i I IVF 



SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT 
No Discounts or Twi-Lite Hr. 
Wed. &Thurs., 2:00-5:30- 



AMHERSrC^Nem 

AMITY ST. • 253 5426 



Coming July 10th "King of Hearts" 
Now Playing Calvin, Northampton, "Oreat Gatsby" 



Mat. 

Sunday 

2:00 



Is 
Everything! 

Wed. & Thurs. 

2:00-7:00 
NoTwiLiteHr. 



''THHEVEI 
LNCEUS""! 

R /^C^ United Arlislsl 

Robbing 36 banks] 
was easy. 

Wed. & Thurs. 
2:00-5:30-8:00 
Twi-LiteHr. 5:00-5:30 8:00 



ADMISSION DURING TWILIGHT HOUR 1.25 



WMMiMday, July 3, lt74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pa«« U 




Photo by Steve Ruggles 




Ti^fytfw 











This week's mystery photo. First person to identity 
this person to the editors in room 422 of the Student 
Union wins a free beer. Last week's dual winners were 
Sisay Bezu and David Booker who correctly identified 
Peter Rod i no. 



101 



Just because I can't read I got an AB in Food Science 




Those good ole days are behind us now. 



PhoTo by Steve Ruggles. 



»«»: 

V 




Perfect flute 



Guru & wife bliss out crowd 



photo by Stave Rugglea 



by Fred Nobles and Mike Kneeland 

Some 12,000 people sat in the grass in front of a 
35-foot high geodesic dome Saturday night in an- 
ticipation of the arrival of Guru Maharaj Ji, the 
"Perfect Master," to Guru Puja 74. The event, held in 
the playing field near Southwest, came at the end of 
the second day of activities planned for the largest 
Divine Light Mission conference ever held in the 
Eastern United States. 

The- Guru was actually supposed to speak Friday 
night but he cancelled his satsang. The night was an 
extremely wet one and most devotees assumed the 
weather caused the cancellation. Joseph Anctil, the 
Guru's public information officer, told the Solstice 
however that "the Guru was awake for 24-hours 
straight«and was very tired." He noted that the Guru 
had jxjst returned from another festival in 
Copenhagen. 

It was generally assumed that Guru Maharaj Ji 
would sleep in his house trailer. Former Collegian 
reporter Mark Vogler learned however that the Guru 
stayed in the Northampton Hilton in a $74-a-day 
executive suite. 

Guru Maharaj Ji, the spiritual leader of the 
thousands of devotees who travelled to the con- 
ference from all over the hemisphere, kept the crowd 
waiting 90- minutes. While workers finished last 
minute adjustments on the Guru's specially con- 



structed white throne inside the dome, speakers kept 
enthusiasm high by leading the audience in chants, 
reiterating the Guru's declared mission to "bring 
peace to the world," and announcing a one dollar a 
ticket raffle for the Guru's old Chevrolet. 

The Apostles, a Guru rock group from Georgia, 
filled in the remainder of the 90- minute wait with a 
ready supply of popular songs whose lyrics were 
noticeably altered to fit the occasion: "Six days on the 
road and I've got to see Maharaj Ji again." 

The premies were also given satsang by the 
Divine Light Mission's president, a sauve looking man 
in his late 20's probably. He was tailored in a white suit 
and white pants. 

Laughter was drawn from the press box when he 
said, "I know you can experience love just by reaching 
into your pocket." While the Apostles sang, several of 
the Guru's aides passed through the crowd collecting 
donations for the Divine Light movement. 

The 16-year old Guru arrived at eleven to an 
enthusiastic welcome from the crowd. The Guru's 
bride, Marilyn, spoke first and made a lengthy analogy 
between non-devotees and "flutes clogged with dirt." 
In the presense of the "perfect flute" and using the 
four tools of "light, music, nector and the word," the 
flutes "felt better, they felt cleaner." Before kneeling 
to kiss the Guru's feet, his wife announced, "We are 
alt his premies, we are all his k)vers." 

(Coatinucd m P. 4) 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 4 




recvclablfl 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



Protest N.C. racism 



Rally draws 10,000 



by Rudolph Jones 

Former Attorney General John Mitchell announced 
that under the Nixon Administration crime declined to 
an all time low. On July 4th 10,000 persons, most from 
organizations including a delegation from UMass, 
gathered in Raleigh, North Carolina to prove to 
Mitchell and the whole country that crime need not be 
defined in terms of purse snatching, rape, or murder 
by unorganized groups. • 

The group of 10,000 came together under the 
umbrella of the National Alliance Against Racism and 
Political Repression (NAARPR) to protest against 
crimes that destroy not only the body but also the 
mind — the crimes of racism and repression. 

The NAARPR has been viewed by many as the 
biggest thing since the Civil Rights Movement of the 
early 60's. However, as the NAARPR presents itself, it 
is obvious that their concern in this march was not 
merely to secure the right to sit in the front of the bus 
or to drink from an "only whites" fountain. This 
march was designed to bring to the eye of the world 
what the NAARPR sees as a plot bordering on facism 
to systematically eliminate the Blacks and the Indians, 
(who in most cases represent the poor) and to control 
all whites who are thought to be involved in Civil 
Rights movements. 

The process used to implement this plot borders on 
such Machievellian ploy's as political repression, 
bought testimonies which results in "frame-ups". 



murder, and in general a disregard for and the 
deniance of the rights afforded under the amend- 
ments of the constitution, (a practice that is becoming 
as all American as the cliche, mom and apple pie). 

What!? North Carolina! a breeding ground for 
racism and repression!? you say. That land of 
magnolia and pacocks that before the McCarthy reign 
of terror was billed as the classical example of the 
New South. (The New South was a catch all phrase 
used by the media to indicate what was proponed as a 
wave of liberalism that was sweeping the South.) 
Theoretically, as this new era of tolerance was 
ushered in, out went the old bugaboos of lynching, 
burnings and other fun acts that went along with 
discrimenation. 

Needless to say, theories have a way of not always 
following through to their logical conclusions. And, 
with this bit of logic in mind, N.C. the glass eye of the 
south, did a complete reversal when the McCarthy era 
crushed what little traces of tolerence that did emerge 
in the form of liberalism and progress (example: the 
trade unions that were suspected of "commie" ac- 
tivities,) that was being made in N.C. But the myth of 
the tolerant N.C. lived on — an empty husk. The 
NAARPR has begun to punch holes in the myth by 
bringing to light incidents, which when taken as a 
whole, becomes a nightmare of things better left 
unremembered... things that were looked on as the 

(Continued on P. 2) 




Clyde Bellecourt Photobv 



Ed Cohen 



Student group hires Wall St. law firm 



Plans to make students a more powerful 
campus voice are proceeding swiftly. 

The Student Organizing Project, alloted 
some $44,000 by the Student Senate, has 
already retained at $6,000 a prestigous Wall 
Street law firm to do legal research on 
student rights. 

Many student government leaders admit 
the project has been kept quiet from the 
administration and especially the faculty. 
Paul Hamel, senate treasurer, said this was 
done because the faculty was voting last 
semester on whether or not to unionize. 

The faculty defeated their unionization 
plan, but had they known students were 
planning to "unionize", Hamel says they 
might have passed the notion. 

Thomas Spriggs, chairperson of the 
project, agrees with Hamel. "Faculty 
unionization would have changed the 
government structure," he said. He ex- 



plained that students, in that eventuality, 
would have no legal rights to sit at the 
bargaining table with administrators and 
faculty. 

The goals of the student organizing project 
are no longer being discussed in closed 
circles. 

Spriggs said the project's purpose is to 
reorganize the government structure and to 
get a more substantial feed-back from 
students; and in doing so to obtain maximum 
student power. 

That student power, he said, does not 
necessarily mean the students will form a 
union "like the AFL-CIO." He sees, however, 
students getting more power to govern their 
academic structure and the University as a 
whole. 

"We want a strong economic base so we 
won't be getting ripped off by outside 
concerns... I'd like to see students working 



for students at a low projet margin, like the 
Student Market," said Spriggs. 

At present, he said, the 13 committee 
members are doing research and formulating 
plans. When the student boy returns this 
Fall, they will attempt to get feed-back from 
them. 

Spriggs said Vice Chancellor Robert Gage 
had not officially responded to the project. 
He said, however, that Dr. Gage had 
questioned whether the project represented 
the students' wishes. 

Spriggs said he expects no major problems 
and does not believe the students will have 
to go to court to define their rights. 

He said that when students have gone to 
court, questioning a college's right to 
stablish a student's activities fee, the courts 
have usually ruled in favor of the ad- 
ministrations. 

"I personally don't want to see the fee 



abolished, here," the chairperson said. 
"Students gel a lot from it.. .and the project 
wants to explain this to the students." 

Other persons closely related to the project 
said, however, that one possible result is the 
abolition of the activities fee. 

Spriggs says the project is essential. "The 
top student government leaders," he said, 
"are concerned with keeping the system 
functioning and they have no time for long 
range plans." 

Treasurer Hamel feels the student 
government made a wise decision by funding 
the project. "For what the potential is, I think 
the money ($44,000) is legit. I think students 
will benefit some time, probably this year. 

"Students can run themselves as good as 
the administration can, if not better," he 
concluded. 



Page i 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pase 3 



racism and repression 



(Continued from P. 1) 



Photo* bv E<* Cohen 




figment of ♦ictions... things 
such as the police state in "1984"; 
the terror of the "Clock Work 
Orange" arxJ the psychological 
mind control of "One Flew over 
The Cookoo Nest". And if 
description seems a bit exagerated 
perhaps a brief summary of some of 
the horrors of North Carolina will 
remedy the situation. 

1. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 
that bussing in Charlotte should be 
upheld. N.C. erupted in racial 
turmoil. Black students were jailed 
In massive numbers and key ac- 
tivists and leaders — Black, White 
and Indian were arrested, given 
political trials and sentenced to long 
prison terms. 

2. Joe Woddell (20) the Black 
Panther Party sector leader was 
said to have died from a heart 
attack by prison officials. He had no 
record of heart problems. His body 
was returned to his parents minus 
its internal organs making it im- 
possible to determine the cause of 



death. 

3. Teachers in Pender County 
make it no secret that they are 

n members of the Ku Klux Klan. Vet 
in this same county a Black student 
was expelled on "suspicion" of 
belonging to the Black Panther 
Party. 

4. William Murphy, a Black farm 
worker was shot to death on Aug. 
6, 1971 by policeman Billy Day 
(white). Murphy was allegedly 
arrested for drunkeness. He was 
handcuffed at the time. Murphy's 
employer stated that the man was 
not "noticeably intoxicated". 

5. At present some 50 Tuscaroras 
Indians are in jail for "parading 
without a permit" charges relating 
to their right of free assembly. 

6. This summer Butner N.C. will 
witness the opening of a behavior 
modification center. This center will 
be made up of 200 prisoners who 
will be "experimentally modified". 
Methods like psychosurgery; 
electroshock, massive drug doses. 









THE SUMMER 




EDITORS 



Michael D. Kneeland 



Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 



Steve Ruggles 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoons, and letters represent the personal views of the authors 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon. Fri. 
p.m. 



8:30 a.m. 4:30 



sensory deprivation, aversive 
conditioning are all part of behavior 
modification. 

7. North Carolina has 72 prisons 
with a prison population of 116(X) 
making it the largest prison 
population per capita in the U.S.; 60 
percent of the inmates are black or 
Indian although these minorities 
represent 22 percent of the 
population. 

And, the list goes on and on. It, 
therefore was not a coincidence 
that the NAARPR choose N.C. as 
the site for their first march. 

The march on Raleigh was a 
significant step in the direction of 
civil liberties. And, while the 
limelight was on N.C, the signs and 
placards that the marchers carried 
testified to the fact that other acts 
of repression and racism was not 
left unheralded. 

Angela Davis was one of ap- 
proximately 20 speakers at the rally. 
And she rallied the crowd on by 
saying that the only way to fight 
this growing facism, is through 
"unity, unity, unity!" For as she 
went on to say, "They must be 
trembling in Washington to see us 
holding hands today — Black, 
Brown, Red, Yellow and White, 
trade unionist, nationalist, and yes, 
ministers and communist." 

The reference to ministers in 
Angela Davis speech was 
specifically in reference to the Rev. 
Ben Chavis, a victim of a N.C. 
frame-up, who is charged with 
among other things, arson and 
conspiracy against the U.S. of 
America; and the Rev. Ralph 
Abernathy who prophesized that. 



"There will be no peace in America 
until liberty and justice is practised 
for all Americans". 

Other speakers at the rally in- 
cluded Jose "Che" Velesquez the 
leader of the Puerto Rican Socialist 
Party, who called for the abolition 
of Puerto Rico as a colony. "No 
country can talk about in- 
dependence when it subjugates, 
when it dominates another." he 
said. 

Another angle was given to the 
rally when Clyde Bellecourt, leader 
of the American Indian Movement, 
expounded on the inhuman 
treatment of the Tuscarora Indians 
in N.C. 

The march which began at state 
capital showed the ease with which 
the country has adapted to such 



protest rallies. As the NAARPR 
group marched up the street, the 
segregationist organizations of the 
Ku Klux Klan, The Rights of White 
People, The State Rights Party, and 
The American Nazi Party staged a 
countermarch along the side. They 
carried placards that read "Commie 
Go Home", "Segregation Forever" 
and "Booooo". Secure in the 
knowledge that the "commies" will 
go home. No attempt was made to 
disrupt the march in spite of the 
warnings of violence that was 
predicted. 

Perhaps the most significant 
result of the march was summed up 
by Ms. Mitchell, the Executive 
Secretary of the NAARPR, who 
declared, "We have beat back the 
myth that people are not willing to 
organize." 




Black students victimized 



By BLACK NEWS SERVICE 

One decade has passed; the 
sorrow songs of the 60's are still 
here with us today. 

Black students, given proper 
directions and resources have 
proven repeatedly, that the 
challenge to learn can be mastered 
successfully. 

Recent reports summaring the 
progress of the Equal Education 
Amendment, have revealed that 
Blacks and minority students are 
still receiving harsh, cruel and 
unequal treatment while attending 
"modern school systems". The 
Congressional records, term this 
action as a "Pushout" tactic. 

"Pushouts", Black and other 
minority students who are excluded 
from school through discriminatory 
treatment, or are so alienated by 
the bias and hostility of the en- 



vironment that they leave, is 
becoming one of the most critical 
problems of the American school 
systems. The problem, which is 
considered widespread by most 
Black educators, was discussed at a 
recent congressional hearing 
chaired by Congresswoman Shirley 
Chisholm, D-N.Y. 

Representatives from the 
department of health, education 
and welfare and a variety of private 
groups concerned with the 
"Pushout" problem informed the 
house sub-committee on equal 
opportunity that school ad- 
ministrators, particularly in the 
North and South, were using ar- 
bitrary disciplinary actions to force 
out Black Students. 

Evidence of these actions are 
visible throughout the country. In 
Amherst huge amount of com- 



plaints have been accumulating at 
an accelerating rate, concerning the 
"raw deal" treatment that the 
University of Massachusetts' Black 
students have been receiving. 

"I can't understand why nothing 
concrete has been done," said Rep. 
Shirley Chisholm, director of 
HEW's Office for Civil Rights, 
which has recently come under 
sharp criticism by progressive 
educators for its "go slow" attitude 
in enforcing laws against racial 
discrimination in public schools. 



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Dean to head dormitory system 



by Mike Kneeland 

In a move to make dormitory life 
more attractive to students here, 
the administration has established a 
Director of Residents Life position. 

Kenneth Dean, a highly 
respected administrator and 
presently the acting director of food 
services, will fill the slot on a 
temporary basis for one year. 

He says he wants to make dor- 
mitory life desirable so that 
students, if given a choice, would 
prefer to live on campus rather than 
off campus. This is good, he said, 
because "the real reason for living 
in dormitories is the educational 
. experience one' gets out of it" 

Dean, who lived one night in 
southwest last Spring, says two 
immediate areas of concern to 
students he intends to investigate 
are increased dormitory security 
and cleanliness. 

The dormitory system was 
formerly divided into two distinct 
areas, business operations and 
residential programming. Former 
Vice Chancellor Thomas Campion 
overlooked the business aspects 



while vice Chancellor Robert Gage 
was responsible for residential 
programming. 

"This made communication a 
little difficult," Dean said from his 
second floor office in Hills North. 
Under the new system, Dean will 
report only to Vice Chancellor 
Gage. 

Dean said this will help students 
since they will have a more ef- 
fective channel to direct their input 
to Vice Chancellor Gage. 

Dean will still be responsible for 
the dining commons as well as the 
dormitory system. He says it's good 
they're now under one organization 
since the two are closely related. 

The Director said there are two 
points students and administrators 
should consider when evaluating 
him one year from now: the degree 
of satisfied students, and the 
financial status of the organization. 

He noted there will be no net 
increase in dormitory living costs 
this year and that apartment 
complexes have already begun 
raising their rents. 

Dean will be assisted by Roger 



Cruff, Margie Lenn, and Robert 
Cambell. 

They agree each person will have 
some special expertise to offer. All 
say they are highly motivated to 
better the dormitory system. 



Other universities, including 
Conn, and N.H., have adopted the 
Residence Life Director position. 
Dean said the system has been 
working well at both schools. 
In a recent staff memo, Vice 



Chancellor Gage said he was 
"persuaded personally that this can 
be the beginning of a process in 
which problems of the past will be 
used only to outline opportunities 
for the future." 




HOPEFULLY, THINGS for these three men will be looking up pretty soon. 
L. to R. Dean, Cruff, Campbell. 



Summer Activities has busy week planned 



by Jackie Blount 
This week, July 11-17, the 
scheduled summer activities will 
include the second in the series of 
five Bicentennial Discussion Hours. 
The speaker will be Peter Spang, of 
Old Historic Deerfield, Inc. Deer- 



field played an important role in the 
early formation of the New England 
society, and much of the in- 
formation that relates to the early 
ettlement of this area can be found 
in the Old Deerfield Library. The 
discussion will be held in the 



Fashion Show Saturday 



in conjunction with the summer 
fund raising festival to be held on 
the Amherst Town Common on 
July 13 and 14 by the Black Cultural 
Center of New Africa House there 
will be live entertainment and 
fashion shows presented on 
campus. 

On Saturday, July 13, at 8 p.m. in 
the Cape Cod Lounge in the 
Student Union at UMass, there will 
be a gala fashion show and dance 
with Hit or Miss Women's Boutique 
of Northampton providing sport 
clothes, bathing and casual wear. 
The dance music will be provided 
by the Dynamic Desatations. 

Fine Arts 

Paintings, prints, drawings 
and sculpture from UMass art 
collection are on display at the 
Herter Hall Gallery this summer 
open to the public without charge. 

A series of three shows will run 
through the Summer School 
session and end Aug. 18. Summer 
gallery hours are Tuesday through 
Friday, 1 to 4 p.m. 

It's ESP again at the University 
this month, when a rerun of the 
"Explorations into ESP" course will 
be presented by he Division of 
Continuing Education beginning 

July 10. 

Sessions will be 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
every Friday from July 10 to Aug. 
16, class location to be announced. 
The instructor is the Granby 
psychic, writer and lecturer 
Claudette L. Kiely. 

Registration is open now; full 
information is available from 
Division of Continuing Education, 
Hills North, UMass Amherst 01002. 



Advance tickets are $2 and are 
available at New Africa House. 

The festival is being held in an 
attempt to raise funds for a Black 
Cultural Center Library and Infant 
Care Center. All proceeds of the 
summer festival will go towards 
these goals. Further information is 
available from Aishah Rahman at 
545-0794, Monday, Wednesday or 
Friday, 10 a.m. — 4 p.m. 

Donations are $2.50 at the door. 
'Exuma' and his Afro-Carribbean 
Music and Real Tears will appear at 
Bowker Auditorium on Sunday, 
July 14, at 8 p.m. Summer and fall 
fashions will be featured from 
Cosmic Concepts and the 
Weathervane. Advance tickets for 
this event are also available at New 
Africa House. They are $3 in ad- 
vance and $3.50 at the door. 



Student Union Colonial Lounge this 
afternoon at 3 p.m. 

The third Summer Music Hour 
will feature guitarist Robert Phelps. 
Mr. Phelps studies guitar at the 
Hart College of Music and also 
teaches guitar for the Amherst 
school system. In addition to 
classical- playing, he will present 
some folk-style finger-picking. Mr. 
Phelps' repertoire will include some 
works of Villa- Lobas, Tarrega, and 
Scott Joplin. Music Hours are are 
Wednesdays from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. 
in the Campus Center Concourse. 

The film of the week will be "The 
Lion Has Seven Heads," directed 
by Glauber Rocha. In this 1970 film, 
Rocha captures a Third World 
assault on various imperialisms, 
and the agonies attending the birth 
of political consciousness in the 
Third World, expressed in "operatic 
tableaux and stylized gestures." 
The showing will be Tuesday, July 
16 at 8 p.m. in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. 

At 7 p.m., Tuesday, July 16, the 
Summer Intramural Activities 
Committee will hold cross country 
races. Both the women's event, a 
distance of one mile, and the men's 
event, 1.7 miles, will offer trophies 
to the winners in each division. 
Entries for these races can be 



The Student Union Art Gallery is 
now presenting its second art 
exhibition. The works are entitled 
"Joe Sam's Nudes." The artist, Joe 
Samuels, used India ink and firm 
strokes to create the desired ef- 
fects. The display can be viewed 
Monday through Friday, fiom 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m., and from 6 p.m. to 
10 p.m. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band 
will be appearing in concert 
Thursday, July 18, at 7 p.m. at 
Haigis Mall (next to the Whitmore 



Administration Building). The PH- 
JB will be making their seventh 
summer appearance at UMass and 
will again delight the crowd with 
"down- home" New Orleans Jazz. 
This music is the basis for all that is 
known as jazz, in addition to being 
the sound that has influenced the 
playing styles of most popular 
music and musicians. In case of 
rain, the concert will be held in two 
shorter sessions, at 7 p.m. and 9 
p.m., in the Student Union 
Ballroom, with Student I.D. 
required. 



Spang speaking 



Following the successful initial 
lecture by Katherine Emerson in the 
UMass Pre- Bicentennial Lecture 
Series will be Peter Spang, 
researcher for Old Historic Deerfield 
Inc. Historic Deerfield is not only 
one of the most scenic areas in the 
Pioneer Valley but also significant 
for a host of historical and political 



beginnings. In the early formatksn 
of the New England society, 
Deerfield was to play an important 
role. 

Peter Spang will host his 
discussion on July 11 at 3 p.m. in 
the Colonial Lounge of the Student 
Union building. The public is invited 
to this Summer Activities event. 



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THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



Page 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page S 



Guru stresses 'zero' to crowd 



(Continued from P. 1) 

In a speech that relied heavily 
on American slang, Guru Maharaj 
Ji told his followers that, "This 
function has got to do something 
that is undescribable." Speculating 
on the progress of the Divine Light 
Mission he went on to say, 
"Something we have been waiting 
all our lifetimes for, wanting all 
our lifetimes, is just three steps 
away." Returning to the same 
theme later with an analogy he said, 
"I never even used to know there 



were automatic windows and 
automatic doors... and here I am in 
America." 

Guru Maharaj Ji, who has been 
in this country only three years, 
spoke remarkably good English. His 
voice was that of a 16- year old in its 
pitch; not high, but seemingly 
changing into a deeper voice that 
has not yet reached its maturity. 

The Guru also gave a five 
minute discussion on the "Valley of 
Zeros." He said people are 















sometimes more concerned with 
the numbers one and two. "The 
number one starts with one and 
ends with one. The number two 
starts with two and ends with two.* 

He told the crowd that unlike 
one and two there is something 
special however about zero. "You 
can take a one and put two zeros 
behind it and you've got 100. You 
can take a two and put two zeros 
behind it and you've got 200." 

The crowd laughed with the 
Guru when he quipped, "I say give 
me zero money and you say O.K., 
it's already given." 

The Guru was concerned that 
his "premies" realize the 
significance of the event: "If we 
don't know why we come or what 
is the basis of life, then what are we 
doing here?" 

The audience responded with 
loud approval when the Guru said, 
"We can arrange such a way so 
that we can hold programs for ever 
and ever and ever." He went on to 
discuss peace and love in the world: 
"This is why we all have come here, 
to try to experience that love... this 
is why the perfect master has come 
into this world, to put us back in a 
place where we belong." 
Presumably overawed by the 
prospects of the Divine Light 
Mission, he then summed 
everything up as "mucha fan- 
tastica." He closed his satsang by 
giving the floor back to the 
Apostles and received loud cheers 
and chants from the audience. 

Guru Puja '74 passed relatively 
quietly according to Chief David 
Johnson of UMass Security. "It 
was a very good crowd, there were 
few problems with anyone." he 
said. The only major incident oc- 
cured Saturday night at about 
eleven when David Sleigh, a 21- 
year old Amherst resident, was 
arrested for shouting obscenities at 
the Puja session. Sandra L Fox, 
another Amherst resident, was also 
arrested when she blocked police 
as they attempted to remove Sleigh 
from the area. Both Sleigh and Fox 
were charged with disturbing the 
peace at a public assembly. 

Some students did voice 
complaints that the Guru people 
had virtually taken over the Campus 
Center. One student said he was 
"physically thrown off an elevator 
by three Guru people" when a 
Mahatma, or disciple, also entered 
the elevator. The student was 
asked to leave, he said no, and was 
then removed. 

At times Guru guards were 
posted by the elevator to control 
the amount of people going up- 



stairs. A campus official said one 
Top of the Campus (TOO waitress 
was told she could not use a certain 
elevator. The UMass official said he 
straightened out the situation and 
the woman was allowed to ride the 
elevator. He cautioned against 
"blowing the incident out of 
proportion." 

Paul Bigelow, the University's 
liason with Guru Puja '74, had high 
praise for the group's conduct. 
"For the size they are," he said, 
"it's been delightful." 

Guru organizers had expected 



BLACK CULTURAL CENTER 

Fund Raising Festival Calendar 

CALENDAR 



Saturday & Sunday, July 13 & 14 

Amherst Town Commons 
10 a.m. - 7 p.m. 

AUCTIONS 

TAG SALES 

BAKE SALES 

ARTISTS & CRAFTMEN DISPLAYS 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Come to the Summer Festival 



10,000 devotees to register for the 
festival and had to make quick 
adjustments when some 600 people 
Friday night had no place to sleep 
inside. 

They appealed to the crowd to 
let the information desk know if 
there was any extra space available. 

Anctil said. Guru devotees do 
not sleep in beds but rather on 
foam rubber mats. He said it was 
somewhat funny to see empty beds 
in a room and its occupants 
sleeping on the floor. 



Guru thrills crowd 



"That's the best I've heard him" 
said 21 -year old Doug Westover of 
Princeton, N.J. "The festivals keep 
on getting better." 

This premie's remarks were fairly 
typical of devotee's reactions 
Saturday night after Guru Maharaj 
Ji gave satsang for some 30 
minutes. 

"I'm blissed out," is how Virginia 
Borelli, 47, of Fall River, Mass. felt. 
"I always love what he says." 

Pat Conrad, 28, of Houston says 
the Guru usually gives the same 
basic satsang but still felt it was 
"fantastic." 

J.D. has only been a premie for 
three months but came all the way 



from Portland, Oregon to hear 
Maharaj Ji speak. The 19-year old 
says the Guru influenced the 
UMass students too: "It's con- 
tagious... it effects them too." 

Near the back of the 12,000 
onlookers was 19-year old Blake 
Brewster of Cleveland. He felt the 
students could not comprehend 
what Maharaj Ji was saying 
because they do not "have the 
experience. 

Blake was referring to a group of 
UMies gathered nearby who did not 
hide their reactions to the 16-year 
old perfect master. 

Said Sally Tirel, 20, also of 
Cleveland: "People gave Jesus shit 
(too)." 




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Weekly star guides 



For the week of 
Jufy 14 Through July 19 

All earthly endeavors are favored 
today and over the next six days - 
providing strict attention is paid to the 
natural course and inclination of things. 
Regardless of the degree of effort or 
devotion to the cause, square pegs will 
still not be pushed into round holes. 
Exceptional gains will be made by those 
willing to abide by rules and regulations 
discovered long ago to be best both for 
performance and results. Experiments 
are risky - if not foolhardy - this week, 
and most especially as the week ap- 
proaches its end. Still, there are 
memorable experiences in store for one 
satisfied to travel an already well-beaten 
path. 

Personal relationships ought to take a 
turn for the better early in the week, 
though it may be difficult for one to 
recognize precisely when that turn takes 
place. Much depends upon the ability of 
the parties involved to fathom each 
other's natures and to accept each 
other's eccentricKies. Any design for 
living this week must include relatively 
large periods for being ak>ne, for in- 
dulging in the kind of Introspection that 
results in self-knowledge and self- 
determination. 



CANCER (June 21-July 7) - Take 
care that another's reaction to normal 
events does not irritate you to the point 
of downright anger. Try to remain calm. 
(July 8-July 22) - You have a 
tremendous advantage over those who 
work with or under you this week. Make 
every moment count where op- 
portunities for career contacts exist. 

LEO (July 23- Aug. 7) - Your ability to 
do what you set out to do should be your 
greatest asset this week. Just be sure 
that your goals are realistic. (Aug. 8-Aug. 
22) — Whatever your views of the 
present situation at home, prepare your 
case well and you should be able to have 
your own way in the long run. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) - Keep to 
what you know best. If you attempt now 
to indulge in new interests, you may find 
yourself in over your head. Increase your 
knowledge. (Sept. 8-Sept. 22) — 
Though you may think another unkind in 
his decision to alter your position, you 
actually may be living through a blessing 
in disguise. 



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) - Where 
members of the opposite sax are con- 
cerned keep your opinions to yourself. If 
not careful, you could easily be 
misdirected. (Oct. 8-Oct. 22) - You 
would do well to take anything you hear 
about another with a grain or two of salt. 
There is much to be said for the doubter 
this week. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - If you 
can argue without malice, you may be 
able to persuade another of your right as 
well as your intentk>n to progress in your 
own way. (Nov. 8-Nov. 21) - If you are 
wise, you will look directly at the week's 
happenings and make your decisions 
accordingly. Cowardice will not pay off 
at all! 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 7) - If 
you would be understood by those 
working with you, make yourself clear 
the first time around. Don't waK for 
another to explain. (Dec. 8-Dec. 21) — 
Take care not to make any irrevocable 
decisions early in the week. Save your 
energy and strength for those matters 
arising late in the day. 



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 5) - Make 
it a point to establish your authority on 
the domestic scene. Otherwise, you may 
find yourself low man on the totem polel 
(Jan. 6-Jan. 19) — Promises made early 
in the weBk must not be allowed to fall 
by the wayside simply because of dif- 
ficulties arising later on. Don't relax 
efforts. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3) - Take 
the sympathetic approach when another 
comes to you with problems. Children 
are in special need of kindness at this 
time. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) — Accomplish a 
great deal this week through the exercise 
of your authority on the home front. 
Know what you are capable of — and 
spread the wordi 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - Share 
any new ideas with those who may be of 
help in transforming them from the 
conception to the protect stage. Reject a 
poor suggestion. (March SMarch 20) — 
Your own efforts to make good must not 
be looked upon by yourself or anyone 
else as fruitless. There is knowledge to 
be gained from failure. 



ARIES (March 21-April 4) - Mike an 
effort to get the rest and relaxation you 
need. The week's work is only iuM begun 
when you start to feel tired of it. (AprM b- 
April 19) - Now is an excellent time to 
develop a new facet of a pereonal 
relationship. However, don't expect 
another to do more than his fair share. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - Make 
sure to stick to the schedule of events 
you or your superiors have laid down. To 
shirk your responsibilities now is to court 
failure. (May 6-May 20) - Make no 
effort to direct your own affairs early in 
the week. Allow those with more ex- 
perience and less to lose to guide your 
activities. 

GEMINI (May 21 -June 6) - The 
difference between what is considered 
proper and what is actuatty right may be 
considerable. Take careful aim on your 
goal before beginning. (June 7-June 20) 
— Though you are not likely to bring a 
present project to a successful con- 
clusion by week's eni, you can certainly 
advance the endeavor. 



Givetmit 




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Capture The Flavor 
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Your Car-Ready For Vacation Driving! 



Before you start off on your 
vacation drive, consider this: 
more than 20 percent of your 
expenses will probably be 
sp>ent on your car. You can re- 
tluce this figure, however, by 
attending to some easy econ- 
omy measures. Concerning 
gas consumption, plan to 
drive moderately, keeping to 
the nation's new lower speed 
hmits. Avoid jackrabbit starts 
and quick stops. And make 
sure your tires are properly 
inflated. These measures may 
decrease your gas consump- 
tion up to five miles per gallon. 

Make sure your car has had 
a good tune up before you 
start off. Get new spark plugs 
if they're needed, have your 
car lubricated, your brakes 
checked, your windshield wip- 
ers, ignition switch, steering 
gear, lights and battery thor- 
oughly looked into. Make sure 
your wheels are aligned to 
increase tire life. 

One important fact to notice 
is whetfher your tires have 
enough tread (three out of 
every ten cars has at least one 
baM tire). Treads of less than 



2/32 of an inch thick can be 
dangerous because they don't 
give enough traction for wet 
or oily road surfaces. 

.An economical way of insur- 
ing good tires is to buy quali- 
ty retreads. They cost half the 
price of equivalent new tires 
and are now required by law 
to meet Federal standards. In 
fact. 98 percent of the world s 
airlines and millions of trucks 
now use quality retreads. 
Most relreaders fully guaran- 
tee their product, .so ask your 
dealer about his warrantee. 

Safely is also important 
when you're driving great 
distances, .And safety begins 
with you! Kat lightly: stop for 
a breather after the first three 
hours of travel — and once 
every hundred miles there- 
after. Try not to travel more 
than 4.50 miles per day. so 
that you conserve your energy 
and stay alert. 

But. most important, have 
fun. .Attend to these safet> 
and economy hints and your 
trip will be a carefri-e and 
enjoyable experience. 



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Page i 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, I974 



I.M. office set for race; other reminders 




One of the single-event highlights of this sunnmer's intramural activities 
will be held at 7:00 PM as aspiring long distance runners compete In cross 
country races. There will be two races, one for men and one for women, 
that will be run on the road that surrounds Alumni Stadium. 

Entries for this race can be sumbitted up to the time of the race. The 
women's event will be one mile and the men's race will be 1.7 miles (once 
around the road) with trophies being presented to the winners in each 
division. But even if your goals are not to be the next Frank Shorter or 
Francie LaRue come on down to the Stadium and have a good workout. 
For information call the IM office. 

The intramural office reminds all thosepersons who are playing in 
individual sports tournaments (tennis, badminton, handball, paddleball, 
squash) to pick up their schedules at the office. If you have any problems 
contacting your opponents or arranging matches notify the IM Office 
between 8 AM and 9 PM Monday-Friday, or call 545-2801 or 545-2693. 
Forfeits should be avoided so that these round robins may be held suc- 
cessfully. 



LAST YEAR'S cross country gun. 



Original radio drama on WFCR 



Ecology films tonight 



Original radio drama by con- 
temporary writers will be featured 
in the newly created National Public 
Radio Theater, beginning July 7 
over radio WFCR (88.5 FM), 
Sundays at 7:30 P-"^- 

National Public Radio (NPR) 
Theater will present plays produced 
for the National Public Radio 
Network by Earplay, a project of the 
University of Wisconsin-Extension 
and the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting. 

Drama is not new to WFCR in 
Amherst. But, in creating NPR 
Theater, the network will em- 
phasize styles and modes of 
presentation, as well as previously 
unexplored subject matter, 
designed to redefine radio drama. 
NPR Theater will span the entire 



scope of radio entertainment, from 
traditional dramatic format to 
avant-garde experiments in story- 
telling. The one- hour drama series 
to be heard each Sunday this 
summer over WFCR will provide 
characteristics of radio drama 
responsible for its particular appeal 
- listener collaboration and 
participation. 

Plays to be featured include: 
"Three Billion Millionaires," by 
Dianne Lampert, July 7; "After 
Liverpool," by James Saunders; 
"The World of Neshiah," by 
Gwendolyn MacEwen; "The Sell 
Out," by Friedrich Durrenmatt; 
"The Night Before the Trial," by 
Oldrich Danek; "The Collected 
Works of Billy the Kid." by Michael 



Undaatje; and "Summer on a 
Mountain of Spices," by Harvey 
Jacobs. 

WFCR, on campus, is a Five- 
College effort of UMass, Smith, 
Mount Holyoke, Amherst, and 
Hampshire Colleges. 



The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will show two free films 
tonight at 7 p.m. in Room 105 of the 
Campus Center. 

"The Flooding River" was 
produced by local scientists and 
explains the Connecticut River 
Basin ecology. Beautiful 
photography is combined with a 



simple musical score for a lyrical 
essay on the beauty and organic 
diversity of our river basin. 

"The Tragedy of the Commons" 
concerns a socio-economic 
principle of individuals' relationship 
to common resources. It is visually 
innovative, fast paced, and wide 
ranging in its subject matter. 



FENTONS ATHLETIC 
SUPPLIES 



19th century wallpaper 
discussion at Deerfield 



All Your TENNIS Needs 



"The Paper Revolution: 
Wallpapers Used in America During 
the Nineteenth Century" is the title 
of an illustrated lecture to be given 
at Historic Deerfield by Catherine 
Lynn Frangiamore, Assistant 
Curator of the Cooper-Hewitt 
Museum of Design, Smithsonian 
Institution. The lecture, the third 
event in the Historic Deerfield 
Summer Series, will take place at 
the White Church (Community 
Center) on Memorial Street in Old 
Deerfield on Monday, July 15 at 
8:00 p.m. The public is invited, 
admission is free, and all are 



welcome to attend. 

Catherine Lynn Frangiamore is a 
widely known specialist in the study 
of the American decorative arts in 
the 19th century. She is a graduate 
of Sweet Briar College and the 
University of Delaware, where she 
was a Fellow of the Henry Francis 
duPont Winterthur Museum. Mrs. 
Frangiamore serves as Assistant 
Curator of the Cooper-Hewitt 
Museum of Design of the 
Smithsonian Institution which is 
now located in the Andrew Car- 
negie House at Fifth Avenue and 
91st Street in New York City. 



RACKETS 
BALLS 
SHOES 

RESTRINGING 
Also — Softball Supplies and Swim Wear 

Open AAon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -5:30, 
Sat., 9 a.m.-l p.m. 
377 MAIN ST., AMHERST, 253-3973 



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on the frame. 




See your specialists with: 

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24 Hour Repair Service 
Sales, New & Used 
Touring & Racing Accessories 
Personal Attention to all Cycling 
needs 




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Amherst 
549-6904 



Black Cultural Center Fund Raising 

Festival 

July 13 Cape Cod Lounge 

Student Union 
8:00 p.m. 

Fashion Show & Dance 

Fashions sponsored by "Hit or Miss Boutique" of 

Northampton 

Music provided by the 

Dynamic Dessertations 

$2.00 Donation $2.50 At The Door 

July 14 Bowlcer Auditorium 

"The Obeah Man" 

Exuma & hSs Afrol Caribbean Band 
Real Tears 

Fashions Plus Sponsored by Cosmic Concepts and the Weathervane 
$3.00 Donation $3.50 At The Door 

All Tickets on Sale at New Africa House 545-2426 



545-0794 



THURSDAY, JULY 11,1974 

N.E. Music 
programs 

this weel< 



Two music programs will be 
offered to the community this week 
at Northeast Music Camp, on 
Hardwick Pond Road, Ware. 

The first will be the student 
recital on Friday evening July 12, at 
7:30. On Saturday afternoon, July 
13 at 2 p.m., the symphonic band, 
orchestra, and chorus will present 
the first of the bi-weekly Saturday 
concerts. 

The Wednesday evening staff 
recital will feature the Northeast 
Music Camp String Quartet per- 
forming the Mozart String Quartet 
in D Major, K. 575. Members of the 
quartet are Paul Goldsberry and 
Barbara Lockridge, violins; 
Valentine Charlap, viola; and Alice 
Miles, cello. Soprano Heather Parr 
will be accompanied by Barbara 
Marlis in a group of three art songs 
by Robert Schumann. Evelyn Fuller 
will accompany tenor Gary Paul 
Parr for the aria "En ferment les 
yeux" rom Massenet's "Manon". 
Closing the program will be a 
performance of a Haydn Wood- 
wind Quintet performed by Joyce 
Smar, flute; Marsha Jaeger, oboe; 
Jean Kacanek, clarinet; Gary Miles, 
French horn; and Ruth McKee, 
bassoon. 

The Friday evening student 
recital will feature camper soloists 
and small instrumental ensembles. 
On Saturday afternoon the 
Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Harold Kacanek of Farmington, 
Michigan, will perform Schubert's 
"Unfinished Symphony", 
"Slavonic Dances" by Dvorak, 
Selections from "Carousel" by 
Rodgers and Hammerstein, and 
"More" from "Mondo Kane". 



All concerts at Northeast Music 
Camp are open to the public free of 
charge. The camp is located about 
four miles north of Ware. Follow 
North Street from Main Street, 
Ware, to Greenwich Road, turn 
right and continue to Hardwick 
Pond Road. 



Macbeth tryouts 

Tryouts for a short student- made 
version of a scene from 
Shakespeare's Macbeth will be held 
in C.C. rooms 804 and 808, tonight 
at 5:00. 



STCAr 
€UT- # 

i/L diffe^nl *> 

Summer 

Entertainment 

Wednesday Friday & 
Saturday 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY, MONDAY A 
TUESDAY «^o* 

Includes Salad Bar *^»» 

STEAr 
CUT* # ■ 

Corner University Drive and 
Route 9. 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pa9* 1 



Origami 

For more than ten centuries this 
unique art form of paper folding has 
flourished in Japan. 

These Origami papers are made 
expressly for this purpose, and are 
offered in assorted brillant colors in 
a variety of sizes and packages. 
Instruction books are also available. 

Try it tonight.' 



Just one of the many fine artist 
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TRANSCENDENTAL 
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Free Public Lecture: 

Wednesday, July 12 7:30 D.m. 
Machmer W-26, U.Mass. 

35 Batterfield Terrace 



Amherst, Mass. 549-6708 





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THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



BOLIE SHRI SATGURUDEV MAHARAJ Kl JAI 











by Steve Ruggles 

July 5,6, and 7 are three days that several thousand 
followers of the Guru AAaharaj Jl will long remember. 
These three days marked Guru Puja '74, a festival of light 
and love. It truly was a festival of love as some of these 
photos show — both a love of the Guru, and a love of other 
premies, both old and young. 

Premies of the Guru were chanting the title of this photo 
essay all weekend. Or is it that the title of this photo essay 
was named after the chant. Either way, BOLIE SHRI 
SATGURUDEV AAAHARAJ Kl JAI is shouted as a 
salutation with a "hands in the air" style much the same 
as "Hiel Hitler". The chant means "speak the praises of 
the Perfect AAaster". 

The premies of Guru AAaharaj Ji were very photogenic 
— although most of them did not know it. They were too 
involved in the festival to realize they were on Candid 
Camera. 

Here are some unretouched photographs of the Guru and 
his premies taken this weekend at Guru Pu'a '74. 








Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page n 




Fourth Amendment 
and privacy 



by Mark Citron 

The Fourth Amendment protects 
against unreasonable search and 
seizure; a guarantee today against 
wiretapping, eavesdropping and 
governmental harassment. But 
what is privacy? Is it the vague 
"right to be let alone" as Judge 
Thomas M. Cooley called in 1888, 
or a legal concept that has yet to 
evolve through judicial precedence? 

The problem is that no definition 
of privacy "rights" exists, and our 
cumbersome, crisis-oriented 
legislative machinery is geared to 
respond only after a situations 
danger is exposed, (which leaves 
one to speculate as to the amount 
of human destruction incurred 
before the fact) Congress has 
treated the problems of privacy as 
too complex, and waited for judicial 
rulings to set the parameters of 
what is an invasion of rights and 
what IBM calls "allowing freedom 
of information to fulfill the needs of 
society." It appears, though, that 



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the assaults on our privacy by 
government, business, and private 
sectors will soon end. Re: the ad 
campaign "IBM Reports" (a full 
page in the July 8 "Time", among 
other national publications) in 
which IBM enumerates the "Four 
Principles of Privacy". Like the 
Mobile O'l Co. advertisements 
telling us of their concerns about 
the oil industries' pollution, IBM is 
telling us that they have a con- 
science and are concerned about 
the Frankenstein science and 
technology often create. 

Broadly taken, there is no harm in 
IBM telling us of their concerns for 
privacy. The danger occurs when 
IBM goes ahead and tries to define 
what is privacy, and then tells us 
the ways to insure our rights to 
privacy. Like the fox who wants the 
job of watching the chicken coop, I 
wonder about which philosophies 
IBM gives lip service and where her 
true motives lie. IBM is the major 
contractor for the 858 Federal data 
banks being operated by 54 



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governmental agencies (according 
to the Senate Judiciary Committee, 
at least 24 of these are primarily 
concerned with collecting 
derogatory information about 
individuals) and is the industry 
leader for computer hardware used 
by credit agencies, banks, criminal 
information files, etc. This obvious 
conflict of interest isn't the major 
complaint with IBM's ad campaign. 
The insidious nature of this ad 
campaign is its timely coincidence 
with Senate Judiciary Hearings on 
privacy. The joint inititation of 
IBM's "conscience" and Federal 
regulatory hearings is not ac- 
cidental, and for IBM to have us 
believe that their social awareness 
is for any reasons other than IBM's 
own financial interests taxes our 
gu liability. 

IBM properly cites one of the 
major conflicts in defining privacy 
as finding "a balance . . . between 
limiting access to information for 
the protection of privacy on one 
hand, and allowing freedom of 
information to fulfill the needs of 
society on the other." The fact 
remains that the computer system 
has not been developed, nor is it 
likely or possible to develop a 
system, thdt is safe from actions 
that could compromise the integrity 
of the information in that computer 
system. With this background, one 
might question the intelligence of 
the UMass administrator who 
authorized making all in-coming 
Freshman submit to a questionnaire 
that wants to know about parents 
income, sexual attitudes, political 
activism, views on drugs, religious 
affiliation, goals in life, etc. Besides 
this personal information, the name 
and address of the respondent is 
required. The point is not that 
(Continued on P. 11) 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
WORKSHOPS 

UNDER ACKNOWLEDGED MASTERS 
OF CREATIVE IMAGEMAKING 

SPACES STIU AVAUABIE IN INTEN 
SIVE SIX DAY SESSIONS UNDER BURK 
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DATER JACK WE I POTT EACH 
WOR^'SHOP IIMITED TO 1? STU 
DENTS, COMFORTABIE ACCOMMO 
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DORMITORY WITH A COMPIETE 
NINE DARKROOM FACHITY ONIY 
STEPS AWAY OUR 91 AfRE FARM IS 
JUST TWO HOURS NORTH OF NYC, 
NFARAVARIETY OF PHOTOGRAPHIC 
ENVIRONMENTS $?6S PER SESSION 
INCIUDINC ROOM, BOARD AND 
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paid for every completed form" 



(Continued from P. lO) 

mformation is being collected 
(although it could be), the point is 
what use this data could be going 
towards, and even more im- 
portantly, the potential of such 
information. It is sadly a reality of 
life in America that if an insurance 
or credit agency desires information 
about an individual; bank accounts, 
credit ratings, indebtedness, prison 
records, hospitalizations, 
psychiatric referrals, etc., that if its 
profitable for them to know 
something, then they're going to 
try and get that information. And 
beyond that, Watergate and the 
Ellsberg psychiatrist break- in are 
two cases as to the degree our own 
government will go to attain in- 
formation about individuals. 

The survey of in-coming Fresh- 
man is probably well intentioned, 
despite the fact the University is 
paid for every completed form. And 
of course, I don't know for sure 
why an administrator would want 
to know whether I agree that 
"College officials have the right to 

Outing Club 
plans trips; 
all invited 

The UMass Outing Club Summer 
Program has an exciting activity 
every Tuesday and Thursday 
evening. Tuesday, July 16 there will 
be hiking at Northfield Mountain. 
Thursday, July 18 there will be an 
introductory rock climing trip to 
Rattlesnake Gutter. All weekday 
trips leave at 5 p.m. 

There are also weekend trips. For 
more information; check the 
bulletin board next to the Student 
Union Ballroom or stop by the 
Outing Club office in Student 
Union room 416. The office will be 
open Monday and Tuesday from 6 
p.m. until 7 p.m. and at various 
hours during the day. All students, 
faculty members, etc. are welcome 
on the trips. 





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ban persons with extreme views 
from campus", or if "faculty 
promotions should be based in part 
on student evaluations", but I can 
guess how some administors could 



use that information. Certainly 
there are many valuable uses in- 
formation on one's attitudes on sex 
or drugs could be used for. And 
frankly, that's what is so 
frightening. 




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speaker system from Lafayette Radio. 

Scientifically designed to give you clear, un- 
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PITTSFIEID, MASS. 
42 Summrr SI. 



AMHERST, MASS. 
IS EatI Pleaunl SI. 



Pag* 12 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 13 



UMass hosting Summer Linguistics Institute 



The University and its Depart- 
ment of Linguistics are now hosting 
the 1974 Summer Linguistic In- 
stitute of the Linguistic Society of 
America through August 16, 1974. 

The Institute is a part of the 
Golden Anniversary celebration of 
the Society and is the 44th Institute 




Above is this weeic's 
Solstice Mystery photo. 
As usual, the first 



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ELIZABETH JAMES • JEREMY SUTE 
WILLIAM WELLMAN. JR. m-^ 
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An AMERICAN INTERNATIONA!. RE RELEASE SL 



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First at 8:45 



DATE' '^°" * ^"^s 

Couples ' 2 Price 
NIGHT: Guy and Girl 



in a series of intensive summer 
programs of teaching and research 
in the discipline of linguistics. 

This summer's offerings center 
on issues crucial to recent research 
in theoretical and applied 
linguistics: the interpenetration of 
philosophy and linguistic theory, 
phonetics and phonology, syntax 
and linguistic universals, poetics. 



and applied linguistics. 

Distinguished visiting professors 
have joined the University's 
resident faculty to offer courses in 
these areas; in addition, courses 
elsewhere in the University's 
regular summer session have also 
been opened to students in the 
Linguistic Institute. 



A Golden Anniversary Synv 
posium, "The Scope of American 
Linguistics: Where Are We At?", 
will be held July 24 and 25, with 
papers by six distinguished 
American linguists. The summer 
meeting of the Linguistic Society of 
America, July 26 through July 28, 
will follow. 



The Institute is directed by 
Associate Dean Donald C. 
Freeman, former head of the 
UMass Linguistics Department and 
its present head. Professor S. Jay 
Keyser. 



person to identify the 
mystery photo to the 
editors/ room 422 of the 
Student Union, wins a 
free beer from the 
already poor editors. 
Last week's winner was 
Jack Margosian who 
collected the draft beer 
on behalf of the Alumni 
Office. He correctly 
identified Julie Nixon 
Eisenhower. 



\aJA5 
COStCOCTtP 

IN 

wew ^ofz\< 

CITY I A' )669.' 




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.XITHF.Mi.ATES 

()fs.mith('()i.i.f:(;p: 



i NORTHAMPTON 



FlCi 



• • • • 




MULNEMMAN 
ROBERT REDFORD 
KATHARINE ROSS 

BUKHCASSIDYANDH 
THE SUNDANCE KID' 

Panavision* • Color by Detuxe* 

Come visit the 6tli oldest 
tl>eatre in the United 
States! And MON. and 
TUE. is DOLLAR 
NIGHT. 



Sunday Evenlngt 

with a 
delicious dinner 

•f the 

Eating Place 

and a 

tine feature film 

at the 



^ CAMPUS , 
cUtentaa 1-2-3 



WiUi every full dinntr. II 
rhoieei letrcpt Drimonico 
Mf ak 1 11 th« Jamet H McMania 
eatinc place on Sunday eveningt. 
a free pau wiU be fiven to ihe 
ff aiurr film of /f<ur choice ai the 
Campus Cinema ij-s "nien. 
a/>»f (fit (Hew. jiDM e«n return 
wMti your pan Huh le McManuf 
/or a rtf rtihlnf tee cream co<«e 
<'*t liMtl abeotuiely FktK 
one 4rlvt.. 
one parkina (pace .. 
one price $t M plut !•■ 

tor one com^ele an^ Mlaxii^ 
evenint 

Each Paaa |« Valid Only On 
Dal* 5ttamp«d 

ZAYRE'S SHOPPING PLAZA 

Rt*. 9 Hadlay 



MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



.1 n^tmrntrmamM I SwJ IVES!!! 



N COLOR 



^^r stmniPnaaiaic/iowuMi 

Wed. & Thurs. • 2:00-5:45-8:15 
Twi-Lite Hr. - 5:15-5:45 






Wed. & Thurs. - 2:00-5:30-8:00 
Twi-Lite Hr. - 5:00-5:30 



CQ>I OICO MOUNTAIN FARMS MALL 
DO *»-jlOJ ROuTtq HAOctY MASS 

WILLIAM PETER BLATTVS 

THE 
DDRCISr 

D..tc.(dbyWILLIAMFI}lEDKIN 

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT 
No Discounts or Twi-Lite Hr. 
Wed. & TIturs. - 2:00-5:30-8:00 

■ .W 

MIEMMON 
JUUET Mills 



.N-*^ I 



Wed. & Tliurs. - 2:00-5:13-8:00 
Twi-Lite Hr. • 4:45-5:15 



ADMISSION DURING TWILIGHT HOUR 1.25 



NOW SHOWING AT CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 

CAMPUS (^ute^fta^^ 

RT. 9 HADLEY IN ZAYRE'S SHOPPING CNTR. 256-641 1 



ALEXANDER SALKIND 

OLIVER REED 'rAQUEL WELCH 
RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN And MICHAEL YORK«0A»>9non 
FRANK FINLAY CHRISTOPHER LEE GERALDINE CHAPLIN 

..RiCHARDLESTER,« THE THREE MUSKETEERS 

wm SIMON WARD And FAYE DUNAWAYo» M-ooy 
CHARITON HESTONo.co.d«>oiiuK.««u 



^ ' 



THE 

THREE 

MUSKETEER: 



PG 



PtMMIM MWMNi WCMlin ' 

|««f ■(i(t4( Mil ■•■ b« *«.■*••• ■«• »n **i 



at 7:00 & 9:00 



BACK BY 

POPULAR DEMAND \ 

"BORN LOSERS 

THE ORIGINAL 

SCREEN APPEARANCE OF 

TOM UUGHLIN 
AS BILLY JACK 



TOM "BORN 

LAUGHLINasBiiiyJack.LOSERS" 



LFLIZABETH JAMES JEREMY SLATE ■ WILLIAM WELLMAN. JR. • '^vSJANE RUSSELL 



""k'.DONHtNDfieOtI 



-"IVICfRAKK U:i,.;;D[lORtSIAYl(»l •^•""SIMMlSUOyD (Ptij 
inCOlon AnAMlRICANINTiimATIONAl R( RElUSf 0. <a^ 




A RERftiASl 



Workers 'planting' campus 1 classifieds 



RIDER WANTED 



UMass physical plant workers are 
planting flowers, trees and shrubs 
at various campus locations. 

William Lambert, the University 
Landscape Architect, said 37 red 
pine trees, 30 light pines, 38 
dogwoods and 12,400 ground 
vincas are being planted by the 
Library. In addition, sugar maples. 



282 was, and 27 more different 
species of pinc^ will be planted 
there. 

Lambert bald work began May 1. 
He said ti.ere have been few 
problems except some minor 
thefts. 

Some 28 arbor vitae, about 12- 
feet high, will be planted on the 




NEW AIR supply vent by C.C 



Photo by Brant WiN 



concerts 



The third concert of the New 
England Music Festival at Amherst 
College will take place on Sunday, 
July 14 at 8:15 p.m. in Buckley 
Recital Hall at the Amherst College 
Music Center. 

The Festival Chamber Orchestra 
consisting of students from leading 
conservatories and colleges in the 
northeast will make its debut 
under the direction of Paul Olefsky. 
Soloists are Anna Manicone, 
pianist, in the Mozart Concerto in B 
flat K. 595 and Theodore Israel, 
violist, in the Telemann Concerto. 
Olefsky will lead the Orchestra in 



the Haydn Symphony No. 88 in G 
major to complete the program. 

Miss Manicone is a veteran 
concerto soloist, having performed 

some twenty different works with 
orchestra in New York City. She 
was accorded the honor of a 
congratulatory visit backstage by 
David Oistrakh on his first 
American tour when he heard her in 
the Beethoven C minor Concerto 
while whe was still a teenager in 
New York. 

Tickets may be purchased at the 
door on Sunday before the concert. 



west side of Morrill Science Center 
to act as a wind screen for the 
nearby greenhouse. He said the 
arbor vitae will stabalize the wind's 
thermal effect on the greenhouse. 

Work is also being done by the 
Graduate Research Center. 
Workers are putting in six inches of 
top soil and are seeding grass to 
give "some semblance of oc- 
cupancy" Lambert said. 

He said workers couldn't have 
planted the grass earlier because 
"contractors have been in and out 
of there so many times." 

The landscape architect said 
Monday he hadn't yet surveyed the 
areas used by Guru Puja 74. He did 
say it was his understanding that 
'they're responsible for any 
repairs." 

In other plysical plant news, the 
design and construction engineer 
says he expects work on the steam 
tunnel systems here to be com- 
pleted by Oct. 

Edmund Ryan said the steam 
lines, which normally last 15 to 20 
years, are being replaced at various 
campus locations. Work began on 
the steam lines last fall. The 
$640,000 contract for the work was 
awarded to Allied Heating Co. of 
Sommerville. 

Ryan said there is an urv 
derground steam tunnel that runs 
from the physical plant to the East 
Experimental Station on E.N. 
Pleasant St. He said there is a 
branch tunnel by Hasbrbuck and 
Moral BIdgs. and to vent it three 
air supply and intake chambers are 
being constructed; one by Morrill 
Science Center, another by East 
Experimental Station and the third 
by the northwest side of the 
Campus Center. 



WANTED TO BUY 

Wanlrd: .\ \ \V body In - asonably good 
I (undilion. .>4».mM» .nm. krep trying. 

7-U 

FOR SALE 



Kidr to Washington. IK° in rrturn fo 
hrip Mith driving, leaving noon 17 Julyl 
rrturning 21 or 22nd. 1 all rvrnings |.«2»| 

:iM». 

. _ 7-11 

AUTO FOR SALE 



Thoroghbrrd l>p«- mare, agr: 12 years; 
I height. 1.1. :i handh Kides English and 
I Wrstern, good brtMid mare potential. Ml. 
I Tobv Stables. .«4»-l(>77. 

tn-18 



Fender .^mp Super Reverb, four tens 17.S 
■watts. Very good condition. Call I-7U-2622. 

tf7-18 

RANSOM NOTICE 
FRENCH HALL 



Renaull 70-71. S radiate. 3S mpg. 4 door, 
perfect shape, st. trans, ask tKi«. Call .'>4S- 1 
((719 nites. 

T^^m 

1*72 Toyota land cruiser, excellent | 
condition, low mileage, front-lock hubs. 
$3060. Call evenings at 3*7 -27 II. 

7-n| 

WANTED 



: 



tje 






SUMMER IN 
AMHERST? 

fiBtySniflMi: 

.'>29 Bekhertown Rd.. 

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 

4 p.m. -6 p.m. 

35c Beer — 50c Mixed Drinks 

Entertainment Thurs. -Sat. 

DINNERS SERVED 

Mon.-Thurs. 5:30 p.m.-IO:00 p.m. 

Fri. 5:30 p.m.-1 1 :00 p.m. 

Sat. 5:00 p.m.-n:(M) p.m. 

Sun. • 4:00p.m. -10:00p.m. 

^■••■••p««>«>«M«aefttswMiwitiflimMtft l 




ALAN BATES in 



KING OF 

HEARTS 



In color & cinemascope. 
Brand new 35mm print. 



\te»^\ 



BAMBI MEETS GODZILLA, 

the funniest short ever made* 

THANK YOU. 

MASK MAN, 

- a Lenny Bruce 'outmej 

in animated cartoon 
Voice by Lenny Bruce 



M 



~^- 



[^ 



Eves. 

7:00 & 9:00 
Sat. & Sun. 
Mat. 2:00 



•<m^q 



.Jl. 



AMHERSTCiK«««' 



AMITY ST. 



253 5426 



Coming — July 17th. "Miclnigtit Cowboy" and "The Long| 

I Goodby" 
Now Playing Calvin Northampton, "The Great Gatsby' 



If .vou want .vour bust back in one piece 
leave t<7 cents in paper bag Thrs. 7 p.m. on 
concrete vent shaft bebtween ('<' garage 

and SV. 

7-11 

SERVICES 



I want to buy your sick or ailing car, any] 
make, any model, any problem, foreign or| 
domesUc. CaU Bob. 2S3-724I. for fast $M.| 

tri 

Wanted: Male runners for MS thesis.) 
physiological experimentation. Sub- 
maximal exertions, (all 54«-l48l. 

7-111 



Car repair hassles? Experienced 
{ mechanic will nx it right. No problem to 
I large or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
I Bob. 2S3-724I. 

tfa-is 



Wanted: Christian fellowship. In- 
terested in forming an informal prayer | 
group? Call S40-I481. 

7-11 ! 



RIDE WANTED 



To I'Mass from Greenfleld..Mon.-Frl. I 
need to be here at 8:30 and leave at S:00. 
Call Uarlcne. 773-93M. WUI pay gas. 

tn-18 



SUBLET 



Attractive openmlnded females for 
modeling and gogo dancing, part time. | 
good pay. Write, give full deUils. phone. P. 
C. Box 212, Knfield, Ct. 

If 8-1 1 

Female roommate wanted for partially j 
furntehed Brittany Manor apartment, 
starting mid-August or September. Call] 
BerU. 2Se-0«l8. 

BICYCLES '"' 



One bedroom ia a 2 bedroom apt. Lease 
ending 31 Jan. '7S. liOS a month, partly 
furnished. Call Sam after S p.m. SSS-3SM. 

in-ii 



HAIR STYLING 



Need cycling info? Repairs, rentals, 
sales •( ail modem bicycles. Pelotoa. I 
East Pleasant St.. Amherst Carriage 

tn-l5 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long. Let us shape and 
maintain your hair through the long 
hot summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers by RK and AMINO PON. 
Your style center. 253-tM4. 
CoUegetown tnisex. 183 No. Pleasant 
St., Amherst, Mass. 

tlB-IS 



HELP WANTED 

Hiring - Small reUil store is now 
accepting ai>plications for .part time 
employment. Frida.vs and .Saturdays 
essential. We are looking for in- 
dividuals who enjoy working with the 
public and have the urge t« sell. Call 
25»4M9 mornings to inquire about 
filing applications. 

7-11 



DO YOU HAVE A BABY? 

Babies born in July and August 1973 
are needed to complete our study of 
number perception. We simply ob- 
serve your child as he plays with a 
series of toys. Interested parents 
please call Jean at !>45-208.'>. 54.'>-0lSl or 
367-2711. 



EXPERIENCED MANAGFR] 
WANTED 

Full time employment starting mid 
August. Retailing, buying, dteplay. 
etc. Apply Emporium India, Carriage 
Shops. Amherst. 

tf8-8 




Page 14 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



Hawaiian 
Puncli 

ASSOnTEO FLAVORS 




46 01 

Can 




Wislibone 
Italian Dressing 

Du 



Three Diamonds 
Solid White Tuna 

PACKED IN WATER 




7 0Z.CAN 



Hudson 
Napicins 

180 COUNT BAG 





Ourtiatne 

on the label guarantees 
jrou top quality. • • and 

you pay less! Nowadays it 
makes more sense than ever to get ac- 
quainted with our Stop & Shop Brand. For 
it offers you a sure way to tower food costs 
without sacrificing quality and you pay less! 
That's getting your Stop & Shopsworth. 

Starts Monday. JMty 8 - SalNrtay, Jaly 13 

llama oH«f»4 lo* mi* nei avfiabi* •« caa* loi* o* lo oih«r r«iaii 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pageis 




WTTHTMiS 
COUPON AND A 
$5 PURCHASE 



FREE! 

Stop & Shop Bleach 

32 ot PLASTIC BOTTLE ^ 

Good Mon . July »— Sal . July 13 Limit on* bo«t« p«» GM»omt. 



OuwOOO 




Ajax 
Detergent 




49 01. Box 




Palmolive 
Liquid Detergent 




22 or 
^\\ Plastic 
Bti 








'00 



^ritisR 

St Michael's, Britain's 
favorite biscuits 
soon will become 
America's favorite 

cookies, stop & shop gets a 
headstart on the Bi-Centennial 
Celebration and proudly offers 
St. Michael's fine English Cookies 
from Marks & Spencer, London. 
14 kinds of delicious cookies . . . 
all made with fine, pure, natural 
Ingredients ... all rushed fresh off 
the boat to our stores ... all dated 
to ensure their freshness. Here's 
proof that fine English cookies 
don't have to be expensive. 
St. Michael's Cookies. 
Only Stop & Shop has them! 

Butter Suttana Cookies 
Batter Crunch Creams 
Butter Crunch 
ChMse Krispies 
Singer Finger Creams 
Rich Shortcaice 
Snack Crackers 
Custard Creams 
Round Rich Tea 
Digestive Sweet Meal 
Milk Chocolate Crunch 
Rich Tea Fingers 
16 oz. Biscuit Asst. 



2 6 o; 
Pkgs 
2 8 01 
Pkss 
Zaoi 
Pkgs 

2( 01 
Pkgs 

2 6 o; 
Pkgs 
2 a 01 
Pkgs 

2 I 01 
Pkgs 
21201 
Pkgs 

21? 01 
Pkgs 
21? OJ 
Pkgs 

2 6 0? 
Pkgs 
2ao; 
Pkgs 
16 01 
Pug 

16 oz. Crunch Biscuit Asst. '^°,' 



»1 
»1 
«1 
»1 
«1 
»1 
»1 
»1 
»1 
»1 
»1 
»1 
99« 
99' 



H n^fr icet Bury liidiii 



Yogurts?.TN''5.3^ 89' 



ASSORTED FLAVORS 

Parkay Margarine 
Seamaid Shrimp Cocktail )»' 
Cracker Barrel Cheese 
Cracker Barrel Cheese 
Swiss Cheese Slices *»ri <»»os 



99« 



v: 49' 

JJ'S ' 

KR«fr 10 o; QQc 

MdiOW P"g " 

kfin 10 01 QQc 

Var.etv fat Pkg " 



% Mw-fricti BHiff tjicmi 



Big Daisy Bread 41 

STOP & SHOP -SLICED WHITE * ' 



'^0 & Slop '6 0/ OQC 



Home Kitchen Bread 

1007o Whole Wheat Bread ^s'r '" *5' 

Stop & Shop Toasties *>< 39' 

Co' 6 3.- P»5 Ojt» 9 r>f Pug B-in 10' : 0/ Pkg 

Daisy Donuts "TcZ.ni^ "p:,°'45' 



?1 0/ 

p., 



69* 

69' 



Chocolate Eclair Pie siop t shop 
Stop & Shop Louisiana Ring 



ITiapi Priced Frtzen Food Buys 

Orange Juice -2-35' 

\00s 0'«r>t* -'u'C**'0'"'*0'<da 

Aunt Jemima French Toast \^'^ 59' 
Macaroni & Cheese '»^ * shop ^"^ 79* 
Shoestring Potatoes 
Taste O'Sea Fish N' Chips 
Taste O'Stf Fish Dinner 



Pkg 

. a S.O0 3 '9°.;', »1 

M', 39« 



NORTHWEST, 



Bing 
C|ierries 



*■"# 



What makes our 
*1?*mb Steak abetter 
huv than satt$eone 
a^'V^mb Steak? 

The beef. Our Rib Steak is cut from our "Quality-Protected" Beef. Beef that's aged slowly, 
naturally, for extra tenderness and flavor in our own federally inspected, spotless meat plant. 
Vacuum sealing keeps the beef fresh and juicy as it tenderizes. Only Stop & Shop has this 
great beef. So no other supernnarket can bring you a value to match it. 



RibSt^ik 




Carefully trimmed steak. 

wrapped in our grillwork 

trays so you see both sides 

before you buy it. 




Chucl( Stealc Blade Cut »- » 79'. 
Boneless Chuck Steak V 

Delmonico Steak-Boneless Rib Eye 
California Chuck Steak ''"""' ^ovr 
Boneless Blade Steak ou..i,y Pro.^,.d b.., «]•• 

Chuck Cube Steak T BeefKabobsChuck 1? 

Stop & Shop ''Quality-Protected^' beef. 

Corned Beef 

^^ DOUBLE CUT ^^^^^^ 

Brisket fiQ^ 

Corned Beef ..f.if,'\'u. M!? %w ^rib 




Breaded Veal Steaks 

{[ iMni-Pnctd iroin oar RncneiitJ 

Chicken or Beef Pies 



CHOPPED AND CUBED 
MAID RITE FROZEN 




Si JNiM-Priced sen SerrKe Den ] 
Swift's l*rvminiu W vt'kl 



STOP & SHOP BRAND 
Made in our kilchen |,° 

with only quality ingredients "*• 



Mc Pork Sausage QQ' 
w SWIFT S PREMIUM " "'IJ3 

SKINLESS ^^ ^^ 



Meat Loaf -2 lb. Pkg. '«o^t- »1« 
Large American Sub Sandwich '„/ 69' 

Potato Salad. 4Q<: 

MACARONI SALAD OR COLE SLAA ■ W ' 

Tuna, Ham or Chicken Salad '.'. 89' 

Macaroni & Beef oeic ous 'l 79* 

Meat Loaf Mmi-pnced- value' ,„' 79* 

Chinese Style Pork Roll % 75* 

fl iMiM-fnced Health 1 Beauty Uds 

y Prell Shampoo 1 99' 
t"'® Ultra Ban 5000. 99' 

, "tf. i;NS':fNT OR POWOFfl BONUS PACK 



Brown & Serve Sausage ,):Z:. ^l 79* 
Smoked Pork Butts ''^r^'ZZT " M" 
Canned Ham '•"Vr?!?"" »3« 

IL Ji«'»»-Priced Fish SBecuttl^ 

Flounder Fillets Boston Lite 99' 

X fliiii mcu iitii-HManciiit | 

Alport's Pastrami 69' 

Longacre Turkey Roll ^-'f «(«' [; 55' 
Hormel Spiced Ham „' 69' 

Sharp Cheddar Cheese »«»»(» «- «1" 
Smoked Beef Slick « ■' s wm m "' »ii» 



^^Cdnsumerisins'* 
New at Stop & Shop 

"Consumerisms" is mini in size, but packed with ideas, infor- 
mation and values Straightforward articles on food, prices. 
The Stop & Shop Cooking School with interesting recipes. And 
the back page is covered with money-saving coupons. Get 
your free copy at Stop & Shop every week. 





Kids. 

flit Stiop&Shop 



It's a big and beautiful week for kids! A week 
filled with kid-loving items specially priced 
at all Stop & Shop stores. Tasty items like 
ice cream and punch, cookies and pizza, 
and happy hot dogs! And. in this week's 
"Consumerisms", you can get a small edu- 
cation on how to organize and handle a 
Kids' Week Party . . . right down to the 
favors! Pick up your free copy at any Stop & 
Shop. 



Chef is; Dee Beefaroni 7Q 

BECFRAVIOll OKSPASHCni t MEATtAlLS — 40m CM ■ %M 

Stop & Shop SalUnes^ii'cSB 

Top with Slop & Sriop peanut t>utl*r. ^^ ^^ 

3 lb. Peanut Butter '^' *1<* 

Costs you less than the leading brands. * '" 

Strawberry Preserve AQ 

JAMBOREE BRAND — 2 LB JAR W W 

Marshmallow Creme 3Q 

STOP & SHOP — 13 01. JAR ** ^ 

6-Pk Raisins %^/^r 49^ 

29' 
59' 

Roman 10 pk. Pizza "kg- QQ' 

Quick and easy meals %m %M 

h Gallon-Ice Cream QQ'^ 

NINE DELICIOUS FLAVORS — STOP ft SHOP W W 

^ Ice Cream Cups QQ^ 

^fW 12 COUNT — 36 oz PACKAGE WW 

Hendrie's Sundae Cups QQ^ 

12 COUNT — 36 oz PACKAGE WW 

\eu. « Fre,h From Our Ou,n B.kery.' 

SMTE ICr 

Witn IKH coupon 

New Fangled Muffins ^^ 

GoooMo. M,^-u^ July 13 ^""■''7.''*?,'r:.'umLU»JR#ll 



STOP i SHOP 
., ,._.,^...,„ 90ZPKC 

SIMEET NOURISHMENT MINI PRICED*' 

Lemonade ^x'crN" 

Cool summer-lime drink al a cool price. 

Libbyland Dinners 

FIVE VARIETIES — 10 oz PACKAGE 



Save 



r^'\\\\^\\\\\\\\N\\\\\\\\\NMW^;g: 



$ 



17J? lilOofS 







I I 



ON FOODS 

KIDS LOVE 

TO EAT! 



I 
I 
I 

WITH THIS COUPON ^i 
ON A 1 LB PK6 Of ^ 

Swift's i 

?l 
II 



I 
I 

H 

\i _ 

ISg Good Hon Jul»l—S*l July 13 ^1 



Premium 

BEEF OR MEAT 

Franks 



254! 
C : 






KToK 

WITH THIS COUPON 

ON A ^ ^ 

Stop & Shop |U 

1 lb. Fresh ||J 
Pizza ^"iii 



mmm 



Good Mon July ft- Sal July 13 
limiloiN pkg pKcuitoiMr 



^< 



WITH THIS COUPON 
ON A 1 LB PKG OF 

Swift's 
Premium 
Bacon "i;^. 

REQ. OR LAZY MAKl^^l 

G«o« Hon July I— SM July 13 ^! 
Limit om pkg ptr cmtoiMf ^| 






WITH THIS COUPON 
ON A 2 LB PKG OF 

Stop & Shop ^ 

Fried 257 
Chicken' 



^1^ 

Is 



^ FnOZCN S^^ig? 

eg GooO Mon July »—S*l July 13 ^Ifif 
Limil onf plig ptr cullofne "^ ' * 



mmm3^^^ 



WITH THIS COUPON 
ON A 1 LB PKG OF 

Stop & Shop 

Sliced 25e 
Bologna 

Good Mon July»~S«t July 13 
Limit on* pkg p«< cu«ton<*f 




M. "s continuing saga \ Stage adds to 'dazzling' play | 



(Continued from P. 16) 

Look, just listen, huh, you learn 
something. So, anyhow, he 
escapes, oh ya, some people catch 
him... I don't know who... Russians 
maybe, huh? It don't matter. I gutta 
Iota dings on my mind — say, you 
know anybuddy wanna buy lectric 
blenders, real cheap? - Anyway, 
after he gets away he goes to da 
police to dell dem what happened, 
right. Well, dey only speak Sand- 
scrit and he don't speak Greek sa 
good, member? Well, Sandscrit is 
Greek to him! You get it 
keed... learn anything yet?" 

"Ah, no..." 

Maybe you been trying but ain't 
been givin...know what I mean, 

keed? Any questions?" 
"How old are you?" 
"Tirty, maybe tirty-one..." 
I thought you said sixteen!" 
"OK, so I'm sixteen, then. I been 
sixteen most of my life. Last tree 
years running I been sixteen. Dat's 
why I'm perfect. Listen, keed. ..just 
member dis: Ya can't look at your 
own life objectively and whistle a 
tune at same time." 



"Ya, but..." 

"I gutta talk to my wiseguys 
now. Hey, Maha..." 
"Ahha..." 

"Lasganya bini-bindi poochki?" 
"Ah shut up I don't haffta!" 
Thus spake Mahraphonhi. 



- Mount Holyoke College's 
newly designed arena stage will 
provide an intimate setting for the 
Summer Theatre's performance of 
"Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and 
Living In Paris" playing through 
July 13 at 8:30 p.m. 

Audiences will again be dazzled 
and amused by Brel's sensitive, yet 
cynical portrayal of the way we live, 
love and die as performed by fifth 



season veteran Michael Walker and 
third season veteran Marcia 
"Bresslour, both of "You're A Good 
Man Charlie Brown," a 1973 
Summer Theatre production. 

When "Jacques Brel.." 
originally opened off-Broadway in 
January of 1968, the critics raved at 
a man whose poetry and musical 
compositions had established him 
as a European success. 



Tickets foo the production may 
be purchased at the Laboratory 
Theatre box office open throughout 
the summer from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 
p.m. except Sundays, or by calling 
(413) 538-2406. 

The Mount Holyoke College tent- 
on-the-grass Summer Theatre 
productions will be held on the 800 
acre campus located at the junction 
of Routes 116 and 47. The public is 
invited to attend. 



a <• 



BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of- 
fering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two— sided 
copies* (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Va cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copying onto one side only, add Vi cent per copy. 



BELL'S 



% 



a HOUSE 



All Pizza's are different! 
Why not try the best!! 

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Open: Weekdays— 10a.m. - 1a.m. 

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Page 16 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1974 



Editorials 




Reviews 



Guru's sat sang: text revised 



YOa HAVE TO^ 
5U55J5 TO 

YOUR Pock EI., 




By ZAMIR NESTELBAUM 

The Perfect Master, like Josh 
before him, has come. And 
hopefully (by now) he has gone. 

And so too his faithful 10,000 
Premies. Premie, for those 
unenlightened of you, stands for 
Premeditated Insanity. For two 
nights, the dining commons 
cookout fields in Southwest was 
converted into a Home For Lost 
Children as the hordes indulged in 
an orgasmic feast sprinkled here 
and there with mumbo jumbo and 
feisty Heil Hitlers. 

And the star of the show, the 
main attraction in the one ring 
circus was, no not Beulah the 
Grizzly Bear, and no, not Tony the 
Wonder Horse, but Guru Maharaj Ji 
the adolescent pubetic who claims 
to be the youngest God since 
Catherine the Great. And nestled 
on his left in a feet kissing pose, 
was his 99 and 44-100's per cent 
pure True Piece wife, kemosabe 
Marilynn Johnson Ji. 

Wearing a different multicolored 
bath robe each night, the clod 
appeared as scheduled two hours 
late each time, with two goons 
astride of his throne fanning his 
every palpitation while he cracked 
his voice (in a manner similar to the 
mythical He-man who whilst 
swimming, yelled out "Sharks! 
sharks! Sharks!!" his voice rising in 



tones and crescendos). With cries 
of "Mahatma Ghandi Sat On the 
Ground!" and pockets of hysterical 
laughter scattered about the 
mindless throng, the fat little nerd 
delivered his momentous orations. 
The following is a stylized account 
of the Guru's Great And Holy 
Words, words that sent his 
devotees into feet kissing orgies 
(Holy Dr. Scholl's Foot Powder, 
Batman!!). 

"My dear Premies! I am the 
Perfect Flute (ed; pronounced fruit) 
that Marilyn referred to. I mean, 
you know, it is quite clear, you 
know that the music flowing from 
my flute is as beautiful as the 
sunripened afternoon moon in 
Rangoon. 

The rest of you flutes are stuffed 
up and out of key, with dollar bills. 
A Perfect Flute has come to teach 
you how to blow him these 
clogging papers and blow beautiful 
music, you know what I mean, you 
know. Its like pickpockets you 
know! When a pickpocket sees a 
person, all he sees are his pockets. 
Nothing else. I see thousands of 
pockets out there Premies. But not 
enough. It's a beautiful knowledge, 
I'm telling you. It's like a pickpocket 
walked by a very wealthy man, only 
he didn't know. When that man 
had gone, he found out that he had 



'Salt' editor rates the records; 
Thinks this is American Bandstand 



a lot of dough. I wish I knew he had 
that dough before, said the pick- 
pocket. It's a beautiful thing ihis 
knowledge. Premies, if you really 
want to experience True Bliss and 
become Blissed Out! Reach into 
your pockets and grab that loose 
change or paper, and take the first 
big step toward receiving Perfect 
Knowledge. Give, please to my men 
out now with the hats. It's beautiful 
to give, you know. 

"Which brings me to the Valley 
of Zeros. There is much meaning in 
zero, and little meaning in one's and 
two's. You cannot construct 
anything with those numbers but 
with zeros you rule the world. I am 
in fact, ya know, a big zero. You 
cannot build 100, with ones, two's 
or even five's. You cannot build 
sideways but you must approach it 
with my divine logic. You need 
zeros. And you may ask Why. 
Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? 
Someone once asked me: Guru 
Maharaj Ji, you are the Perfect 
Master, but why are you such a big 
asshole? And I replied: 'Why do you 
ask why? Why not! It's so simple 
and so beautiful to ask why and not 
to know.' It's beautiful to be 
ignorant, and not intellectual like 
the sad world. It's like a leaf falling 
from a tree. When it falls, the wind 
takes it and blows it away. Poor 
leaf. But don't ask why, because 
the leaf did not possess my Perfect 
Knowledge. It coukl not contribute. 

Premies, stay away from that 
curtain. Don't puli it! 



by Mike Kostek 

Let It f/ow-Elvin Bishop 
(Capricorn CP 0134) time 42:09 

Elvin's been pooting around for a 
number of years since leaving 
Butterfield's Blues Band, dragging 
various sorts of blues- sou I en- 
tourages with him through three 
Fillmore- Epic albums that did have 
their moments but were, in general, 
faded. 

Let It Flow seems like a natural, 
or Pigboy Crabshaw hisself comin' 
on home to Jawja and finding 
Allman-Capricorn Records all set to 
pay lots of attention to his good old 
loosey goose self. There is time on 
here when too much of nothing 
does pervail, but they are 
overridden by some great 
moments, with Dickie Betts and 
other folks that make this an im- 
mensely likeable country-funk blues 
mover. 

This doesn't have the simple- 
mindedness of Marshall Tucker or 
the irresistible power of the Allmans 
to coin a lot of nickle for Capricorn 
as Elvin's too old for such flash. 
One for fans. 

A high integrity B. 

KING BISCUIT BOY-Kmg Biscuit 
Boy (Epic KE 32891) time 32:10. 



Another old-timer with a trunk 
full of integrity and obscurity has 
made a new album after banging 
around for awhile. Where Bishop 
carried himself to the Allmans' 
home in Macon, Georgia, King 
went down to New Orleans and the 
wonderous hands of producer 
Allain Toussaint combined with the 
perfect rhythm of The Meters, the 
city's finest back-up band. 

King Biscuit Boy a-k-a Richard 
Newell has been long called 
Canada's finest harmonica player, 
and some say the whole world. 
While he is not as facile and 
monsterous in his way as Paul 
Butterfield, he still blows up a 
storm. Solid. This meeting of 
Canadian blues and sweet New 
Orleans Cajun soul is a creamy 
blend of the two, much like But- 
terfield's two Better Days albums. 
The main problem is that each track 
seems either too stiff or else un- 
derdeveloped, lacking the full- 
blown mastery of Butter's tunes. 
But still hot stuff. 

Boo to Fusioo's Mad Peck for not 
seeing fit to compare King Biscuit 
to Butterfield in his liner notes. 

A, could have been a great B. 

I Wanna Be SelfishAshiord & 



Simpson (Warners BS 2789) time 
35:33. 

This is sweet stuff. Yes, Nick 
Ashford and Valerie Simpson did 
write "Let's Go Get Stoned" and 
"You're All I Need To Get By", but 
they have brighter futures ahead of 
them performing and producing 
their own material. Supple, graceful 
soul, comparable to the halcyon 
days of Marvin Gaye & Tammi 
Terrell. 

A get in on a good thing B plus. 

Monkey Grip-B'\\\ Wyman 
(Rolling Stones COC 79100 time 
36:32. 

Not as bad nor as good as you 
might expect. Stones fans will find 
this collection simple (but not bass- 
ic) enough lyrically ("I wanna get 
me a gun — N' scare the shit outa 
everyone", "Ding dong bell — 
Pussy's in the well — Who put the 
pussy down?", but the strictly light 
Ringo goodtime rhythms will 
probably bore that desperate 
crowd. 

Stones scoffers will find 
themselves seduced by the 
gregarious catchiness of the tunes, 
and will hate themselves for it. 

On the all, a pretty decadent, 
simpleminded album (guess what 



"Pussy's about) that goes nowhere 
except back to bed. 

Status Quo B. 

Tolonenf- Jokka Tolonen (Janus 
JLS 3066) time 32.30. 

We talked last week about 



Tolonen's group, Tasavallan 
Presidentti last week, and this is the 
guitarist's solo album, recorded in 
1970. 
A hot jazz B. 



Guru's Rx: placebo 



Thus spoke Malroponhi 



HAving attained a grade of 
extreme lowness in his Calculus 
exam, M left his dorm and the 
lounge of his dorm, where much 
partying did ensue, and went into 
"the campus". There for twenty 
minutes he enjoyed his spirit and 
his beer and did not tire of it. But at 
last there came a change of heart; 
besides, happy hour had ter- 
minated. 

And so he did take his books, few 
in number, and did make paths for 
the library. There he entered the 
Deus ex machine and was uplifted 
to the highest and lonliest place on 
"the campus". 



What followed was perhaps the 
greatest encounter in the history of 
Western philosophy since the 
meeting of Boswell and Jonson, 
Erasmus and More, or Joeseph and 
Nemo. It was the most fortuitous 
event in the life of Edward M. when 
he met Guruji Mahrahooji 
Mahraphonhi that hot, July night. 

He sat cross-legged, surrounded 
by his three wisemen: Maha, Ahha, 
and UnhUnh. 

"Oh, pardon me, I didn't..." 
began M. 

"Hey, keed, come on en. Gut 
eny spare change?" 

"Why, no, I..." 



"Wanna purchase pretty but- 
tons, T-shirts, dirty post cards?" 

"Ah, no. I don't think I..." 

"Dat's good. You shouldn't dink. 
Dat's da ding, ya know. Ya gutta 
lose your mind." 

"That's why I came to this 
school," retorted M. 

"Say, what's your name, keed?" 

"Oh," replied M extended his 
hand for a shako. "It's..." 

"Don't booher. I don't care. You 
dink I care about you brother? Ha! 
You giitta lot to learn." 

"Well," 

"You students and keeds all 
alike. You want, maybe, some 



Dr. William Nolan jokes about it 
in his latest book, "A Surgeon's 
World." 

Mrs. Lazar, he humorously 
relates, is a patient convinced 
something is physically wrong with 
her. Dr. Nolan examines her closely 
finding no cause for Mrs. LazaKs 
pain. He's seen her many times 
before and knows the pain is 
emotional, not organic. 

Nevertheless, he orders pills for 
Mrs. Lazar. She never suspects 
they are totally worthless capsules. 
Amost instantly Mrs. Lazar feels 
better. The good doctor has 
"cured" her. Thanks to the placebo 
effect. 

Guru Maharaj Ji could have been 
a fine doctor himself. Placebo is no 
strange word to him. 

After talking to many premies, 
devotees with Guru's knowledge, 
one "sympton" seemed to prevail. 
Before learning of Guru they were 
unhappy. They felt something was 
missing from their lives. They didn't 
like and couldn't cope with nuclear 
age pressures. 

Enter Guru Maharaj Ji, the "living 
perfect master." 



He told these people he could 
make them happy, more happy 
than they could even understand. 

And the prescription was an easy 
one to swallow. Follow Guru's 
techniques and perhaps donate a 
little money to the Divine Light 
Mission. 

They talked to premies who 
reinforced all Guru had said: 
through his grace and knowledge 
their lives are happy, more happy 
than they had ever been. 

This sounded too good to be 
true. Still they meditated, read 
books about the Guru, and 
meditated some more. 

Before long they "felt" Guru's 
knowledge entering their hearts. He 
was right! Indeed he's the perfect 
master! 

Like Dr. Nolan prescribing 
worthless medicine. Guru Maharaj 
Ji has "cured" his patient; another 
convert. 

Ironically, the Guru has done a 
good service for the people: he has 
made them happy. 

Then again, everyone knows 
what happened to Humpty 
Dumpty. 

Mike Kneeland 



knowledge, maybe? 

"I suppose so I could go back to 
pre-med if I had..." 

"Fat chance keed. Ya know, 
dere's only two dings... two dings 
in dis world: Shunshine and money. 
Dat's how I make a living." 

"That's irrelevent..." 

"No. Dere's lotsa erelephants 
where I come from. Hey, keed, I tell 
you story, huh?" 

"Sure, just make it short. I have a 
date to play pinba..." 



"Just listen, huh? - Dere's dis 
guy, ya know, forty, maybe fifty 
years old, maybe sixteen — how da 
hell am I supposed ta know, huh? 
But, don't matter anyhow. 
Anyways, dis guy don't speak it 
Greek sa good, right? Well, he has 
dis dream in Greek and he don't get 
da message — you follow, keed? — 
good. Listen. He goes out hunting 
and the general says to him - oh, 
ya, I forgot to tell you about da 
neneral... but dat's no important. 
(Continued on P. 15) 




Rookies living on hope 

while vets picket camp 



BY MIKE KNEELAND 

It could have been a tense 
situation. Despite the University's 
warnings that it would not permit 
striking players of the Patriots to 
picket on campus, some eight 
players did just that. 

In the background loomed a 
UMass police officer leaning 
against his squad car. He was 
watching the Patriot's captain Jon 
Morris, leader of the group, and the 
seven other players walk in con- 
tinuous circles outside the locker 
room at Alumni Stadium. 

But the climate was completely 
relaxed. The players were in good 
humor, cracking little puns while 
striking, and the police officer 
seemed thrilled with such proximity 
to the players. 

One Patriot coach walked by and 
saw Randy Vataha with his sign. 
"Hey Randy," the coach jokingly 
yelled, "at least you could do a little 
jogging!" 

A young lad with stars in his eyes 



asked for Vataha's autograph. So 
Randy gave the boy his sign to 
carry while he signed his paper. 
Walking away from the 5' 10" star 
the lad said, "Hey! I've got your 
football card at home!" All the 
players chuckled at the boy's 
excitement. 

Walking in the humid, 90-degree 
weather, Morris told his teammates 
that the experience reminded him 
of the National Guard. 

Even though the players 
assumed a low key attitude, they 
remained determined with their 
cause: basically a dispute with the 
football owners over how much 
control an individual player should 
have. The owners have charged 
that if the 50 demands by the 
players are met, it will put them out 
of business. 

The signs read "No freedom, no 
football", "Monopoly is played with 
dice, not people", and "Players are 
people, not property." 



Morris stressed that the 
protestors were not looking for any 
trouble here. "We just want to 
make a point", he said. 

The center said he understood 
why the rookies and free agents 
had to report to camp. "We realize 
they're in a difficult situation.. .- 
they've got to do it (strike) as a 
group. They can't do it alone." 

The men picketed for only an 
hour Sunday before storing their 
signs to watch the rookies work out 
at the practice field. 

THE SEASON 

Inside, Coach Chuck Fairbanks 
was watching Patriot hopefuls 
sweat through exercises. 

In a recent press release he had 
noted that 1973 "was a good 
starting year for us, but certainly 
not a great year." 

The Patriots finished with a 5 and 
9 record. The Coach said he was 
(Continued on P. 6) 



Photo by Steve Rugglea 



The Summer 



vol. 1 NO. 5 




recyclable 



THURSDAY, JULY 18. 1974 



Many concerned about teenage 
pickers living in UlVlass frats 



By MARK VOGLER 
and MIKE KNEELAND 
The President of the Student 
Government Association (SGA) 
has asked Amherst town officials to 
check into complaints that teenage 
tobacco pickers living in campus 
fraternities are being mistreated. 
Richard Savini noted that some 
3(X) youngsters living in various 
fraternity houses are not being 
allowed visitors, an apparent 
violation of their rights. A 
uniformed guard is frequently 
perched on the fraternity's porch. 
The youngsters come to the 
UMass area from such southern 
states as Georgia and North 
Carolina to work for Consolidated 
Cigar Corp. at $1 .65 per hour. Most 
of them are of Puerto Rican arv 
cestry. 

Donald Prill, a director of 79 
Florida youths residing in Sigma Phi 
Epsilon fraternity said "the kids 
here are perfectly happy and don't 
need anybody i;oining here to make 
trouble." 

Prill was referring to efforts by 
members of the Association de 
Trabajadores Agricoles (ATA) 
union to talk to the youngsters. 

"There is no law under the sun 
that's going to allow them in here if 
the kids don't want them. They've 
harrassed me by coming up here 
several times. The kids practically 
threw their dinner at them." 

Doug Cuomo, a spokesman for 
ATA, said that members of his 
group trying to visit the fraternity 
house had been intimidated by Prill 
and threatened with possible police 
action. 

"But what bothers me the 
most, " he said, "is the attitude of 
the UMass and Amherst police - 
avoiding both sides of the law. On 
one hand they'll say that they won't 
arrest us for trespassing, but then 
threatening us with disturbing the 
peace." 

Dan Melley, a UMass spokes- 
man, said the situation is not a 



University problem because the 
workers are non-students and they 
are living in fraternity houses the 
University does not control. 

"I don't like that stand," said 
Savini. "It shouldn't matter 
whether you're an administrator or 
student. It's a disgrace to have that 
going on." 

The SGA president 

acknowledges the issue is a very 
delicate one. "I don't want to be 
hurting the kids ... They're here to 
earn money and we don't want to 
put them out of a job." 

He said he doesn't want to see 
the issue pushed to such a degree 
that the young workers would be 
taken out of the fraternity houses 
and boarded some place with poor 
living conditions. 

"I don't want the kids thrown off 
campus. We should be saying 'why 
does that situation exist?' ... 
especially here where we're sup- 
posed to be more observant of 
human rights." 

Jay Savereid, chairperson of the 
Amherst Citizen's Review Com- 
mission, thinks the University 
"probably has some kind of 
control" over the situation. In either 
case, he says, a committee 
representative is looking into the 
situation. That person, he said, is a 
high school student who recently 
joined the Commission. 

Savereid, who is also the UMass 
Ombudsman, said his town 
committee has no power except to 
"investigate and recommend." 

Meanwhile, the state Department 
of Public Health (DPH) has urged 
the Cigar company's officials to 
allow ATA members to visit the 
workers. 

Willard R. Pope, DPH Deputy 
General Counsel, said the union 
had a visitation right and termed 
the Cigar company's refusal to 
grant thi". request "contrary to the 
Massachusetts General Laws." 



In a recent memo sent to 
Consolidated Cigar Inc. he wrote, 
"The Department has promulgated 
regulations governing the rights of 
visitations. Those regulations are 
clear and prohibit Consolidated 
Cigar Incorporated from barring 
visitors during the visiting hours, 
which are between the end of work 



and 10:30 p.m. 

"The regulations do not permit 
Consolidated to bar visitors 
because the workers are minors, 
because the visitor cannot identify 
a specific worker or because a 
worker did not initiate the request 
for visit," the memo said. 
Hurly has claimed that because 



the youngsters are minors the 
company acts as "parents in al)- 
sentia" and can control who visits 
them. 

Pope said that if Consolidateu 
refuses to cooperate, the state's 
department would seek an in- 
junction in the superior court to 
stop the violation of law. 



Grad seeking Conte's seat 



A 1969 UMass graduate 
presently a library assistant here 
has announced his candidacy for 
the First Congressional District. 

Kenneth R. Mosakowski, 27- 
years old, will face Thomas 
Manning, an assistant district 
attorney for Berkshire County, in 
the Nov. democratic primaries for 
the seat presently held by 
Republican Silvio Conte. 

Mosakowski says Conte can be 
beaten, especially this year when 
public sentiment seems to be riding 
against many Washington in- 
cumbents. He also believes an 
increase in the number of young 
voters in the district will work in his 
favor. 

"Conte hasn't been opposed 
since 1962. Since then UMass has 
doubled in size; there are more 
younger people than before." 

The candidate says these young 
people "can't relate to Conte very 
well" because "he's of the old 
school." 

Mosakowski's main complaint 
with Conte's Washington per- 
formance is that "he plays both 
ends of the issues against the 
middle." 

He says Conte has supported 
Nixon 43 per cent of the time and 
has opposed him 49 per cent of the 
time on various issues. "That's 
pretty strong support for a Mass. 



person, even though he's 
Republican," said Mosakowski. 

If elected, Mosakowski said he 
would like to serve on the Ap- 
propriation's Committee. "That's 
where the power is," he told the 



Solstice Tuesday. He says he'd 
have a "good chance" of getting 
on that committee because "I'm a 

Democrat." 
The Congressional hopeful says 
(Continued on P. •) 




Mosakowski (r) with campaign helper. 



Photo bv Jim Pouin 



Pa«t 1 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1974 



THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pag* 3 




Blacks and media: 
'a raw deal' 



Photo by ShMwood Thompaon 

Barry Williams, newly elected Black Affairs 
Director for WMUA 

Jim Grant speaks 



Jim Grant is considered to be one 
of the most dynamic Black leaders 
in North Carolina. Originally a Vista 
volunteer from Hertford, Conn., 
Jim was active in setting up a Black 
Studies program at North Carolina 
State University and a community 
center in Charlotte. Now Jim is 
serving his sentence of 25 years in 
prison for allegedly committing two 
crimes; 1. the burning of a stable, 
an event which took place three 
years before he and two other 
activists were accused, and for 
which there was no evidence 
connecting Grant and the others to 
the crime; and 2. aiding the escape 
of two convicted men. These two 
men were set free after testifying 
against Jim Grant. 

An investigation by the Charlotte 
Observer revealed that both men 
were paid thousands of dollars by 
the U.S. Justice Department for 
their false testimony. The following 
letter was read at the July 4th 
demonstration as follows: 

Brothers and Sisters: 

I never thought, at the beginning 
of the civil rights struggle some 14 
years ago, that today so many 

m — ■— ■ ■ I fi i - t r' =a[ 



people would be gathering on my 
behalf on other's behalf to protest 
the injustice perpetrated against me 
and other political prisoners by the 
racist state of North Carolina. I 
am extremely grateful to you all for 
coming out. I myself have par- 
ticipated in, and organized many a 
protest, vigil, etc. and I know that 
sometimes I have wondered 
whether it would do any good. That 
was especially true during the early 
days of the civil rights movement 
and beginning of the anti-war 
struggle in the 60's when people 
were still squeamishing about 
talking or taking positions against 
the Establishment. But we con- 
tinued, perhaps because one or two 
more people became curious and 
started asking questions about 
what was happening, and after all, 
the lives of 15 million Vietnamese 
and 6 million Black people were at 
stake, to say nothing of the peace 
and security of the rest of the 
world. 

And because enough people got 

together enough times all over this 

country to protest and demonstrate 

their opposition to U.S. policy here 

— - " Iff 



BYINGREDBABB 

Blacks took to the streets in 
protest in the late '60s. And, as 
cities burned and new militant (in 
white vernacularl or liberationist (in 
ghetto lingo) groups were created, 
the white community divided into 
two sections — the "right-on!" 
whites, (the liberals), and the "Oh 
my God!" whites (the con- 
servatives, racists birtchers and 
other assorted bed fellows). These 
groups were divided politically but 
they both heard the same drum 
beat: The natives are restless 
tonight! 

In response, the great super 
structure, otherwise known as 
"The Man" came up with a plan to 
ward off what was rapidly 
blossoming into mass ghetto 
violence (a phenomena that was all 
right in its place, but who knows, 
maybe it would spread to the 
suburbs). The plan said: Give them 
a few bones — placate them for 
awhile. Give us time to undermine 
their organizations, discredit their 
leaders and implant a panic button 
of p>aranoia in every mind. The 
"right on!" wljjtes and the blacks 
were both taken in by the super- 
ficiality of the plan. 

The plan worked. A few bones 
were thrown to the crowd as 
pacifiers and white we scrambled 
among ourselves, the system was 
systematically destroying our 
organizational framework. 

One of the bones thrown was in 
the area of communications — 
"You've come a long way, baby." 
We were told. And, overnight, dark 
faces popped up on the screen in 
movies, in prime time series, 
commercials, newscast and even 
your favorite all day soap, (one 
small step for mankind, one giant 



step for blacks). 

Well, that was in the 60's. Now 
the sign of the time is changing. 
The neon lights are spelling out 
new messages - "You've come a 
long way — maybe." 

The hand writing on the wall is 
especially clear when we examine 
the "gains" made in the area of 
communication. 

When the broadcasting com- 
panies in New York came up before 
the FCC to have their license 
renewed for the '73 - 75 period, 
they found a stumbling block in 
their way. Black community groups 
organized themselves to prevent 
the renewal being given. The 
rational behind this stand was to be 
found in the overt racism of the 
networks and radio stations which 
showed a significant low to non- 
existing minority employment ratio. 
Although there was little doubt in 
anybody's mind that the renewal 
would be given, such delays proved 
not only long but expensive for the 
broadcasters. The dwindling sight 
. of the almighty dollar once again 
did its thing. The broadcasters 
conceeded to the demands. 

Those gains made in '73, 
however, were short lived. In 1974 
the number of blacks and minorities 
hired in '73 had declined by 
significant percentages within that 
one year! This cut back spotlighted 
the black male. The black male was 
either fired or quit and was replaced 
by black females. In any other 
situation the hiring of black women 
would seem impressive, but the 
broadcasters were hiring these 
women in low-keyed positions such 
as clerical and secretarial slots, 
which were low paid and in which 
they could exert virtually no in- 



and elsewhere, a movement, a 
people's movement, was created. 
This movement, because it 
represented a significant portion of 
the community, was in the position 
to force some concessions from the 
government, minor as they might 
have been. 



Looking back on it all, it was a 
step in the right direction and an 
example of what is known as 
People Power, which, in the final 
analysis is more powerful than 
money, more powerful than 
property, it is more powerful than 
defense and bombs, which is why 
the government fears it. 



Those in power are determined 
to stay in power by any means 
necessary. We must be more 
zealous than ever and not let our 
egos or our ideological differences 
get in the way of our task. The 
eneby in the United States has 
united in its determination to crush 
us. We must wage a fight-back 
campaign so fierce, so educational, 
so pregnant with consciousness 
building, that the enemy's attack 
will be turned around. Once done, 
we can take to the offensive. 

We no longer have the luxury of 
free speech and equivocation. 94 
percent of the world's population is 
looking to us for help and for hope. 

In struggle. 



THE SUMMER 



EDITORS 

Michael D. Kneeland Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 



Steve Ruggles 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole. Signerl editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoons, and letters represent the personal views of the authors. 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. 
p.m. 



4:30 




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MAROm 



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Friday Nlte, till 9 



fluence. Thus the stations were 
able to claim that they indeed had 
maintained their black quotas. 

WQXR, a New York radio station 
had in its employment in 1973 a 
listing of two blacks. In 74 it 
retained this same listing. However, 
in 73 the two blacks were males in 
key positions, in 74 these em- 
ployees were replaced by two 
women (black) in secretarial 
positions. 

WCBS-TV has also cut back 
drastically in the employment of 
blacks. This trend has also been 
followed by its radio station WCBS 
which now holds the record of 
having the largest percentage drop 
of black and minority employment. 

WNYC radio station and WNET 
educational TV, has also had 
alarming cuts in its black em- 
ployment pattern ranging from 20 - 
30 percent reductions. 

Clearly broadcasters do not feel 
the need nor the pressure to 
continue hiring minorities. If this is 
so, then even more drastic 
reductions in minority staffing will 
be made. 

It seems that it's time again for 
blacks and the white radical front to 
unite against the recurrence of 
racist hiring tactics that are again 
being manifested by the broad- 
caster. 

Drive 

Preparation has begun for the 
1974 Amherst Community Chest 
Campaign to be held in Amherst 
during the month of October. An 
organizational lunch meeting was 
held last Tuesday, July 2, at which 
campaign chairman Robert Klein of 
71 Mount Holyoke Drive reviewed 
recent Chest campaigns and 
described plans for the upcoming 
drive. 

Mrs. Helen Field of 20 Hills Road, 
president of the Amherst Com- 
munity Association, sponsors of 
the Chest drive, also spoke. Some 
24 persons interested in the 
planned drive and expecting to 
participate in it were present at the 
meeting. Mrs. Fields told the group 
that an increase in the variety of 
comnvunity agencies benefiting 
from the campaign is anticipated. 

A recent series of Association 
budget hearings for the campaign 
being planned drew 22 agencies 
seeking Community Chest support 
for their services to Amherst area 
residents. 




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Big names highlighting week 



Toma 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 

One of the highlights this week 
will be a lecture on "The New Cop" 
given by David Toma, the detective 
made nationally famous by the TV 
series "Toma," which is based 
upon his career experiences. 

Toma has been called the great 
impersonator and the man with a 
thousand faces by the press. He 
has been injured and hospitalized 
more than 30 times from beatings 
and stab wounds, yet he has not 
fired his gun once during his 17 
years of service on the Newark 
Police Force. 

Despite the scores of dangerous 
exploits he has been involved in, 
Toma doubts he could kill anyone, 
even if he had to. In the thousands 
of talks he has given across the 
country, he has stressed that 
violence is unnecessary. 

Toma has no interest in busting 
the nickel-and-dime junkie or the 
numbers runners. He says they can 
lead to the real criminal elements 
higher up, and they have taken him 
there. He has broken $20,000,000 
gambling rings and important 
narcotic dealers. Time and again 
the lives of his wife and children 
have been threatened. 

He will speak Wednesday, July 
24 at 8 p.m., in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. His opinions are 
strong, and they are all his own. 



Car course 



The Commuter Assembly and 
the Office of Commuter Student 
Affairs are sponsoring a free, non- 
credit auto mechanics workshop to 
begin July 25. 

The course is designed to aquaint 
the student with the fundamental 
practices and theories underlying 
automobile operation; it is aimed at 
people who have absolutely no 
knowledge or experience with 
automobiles and automobile repair. 
The course will be taught both in 
classroom and in shop, meetings 
will be held in the Campus Center 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
through 15 August from 6 p.m. to 9 
p.m. 

Applications will be accepted 
through July 22. A substantial 
majority of the seats available will | 
be reserved for UMass un- 
dergraduates. To register, and for 
more information, see Joe Beals in 
Room 229 Whitmore. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
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PHJB 



Preservation Hall Jazz Band 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
An event no one should miss is 
the performance by the Preser- 
vation Hall Jazz Band PHJB tonight 
at 7 p.m. on Metawampe Lawn 
behind the Student Union. 

Preservation Hall itself is at 726 
St. Peter Street in New Orleans, 
right at the entrance to the French 
Ouarter, and very near Basin and 
Canal Streets where Jazz was born. 
The building was originally a private 
home, built around 1750. In 1952, it 
became an art gallery, and in 1961 
its present owners transformed it 
into one of the most popular spots 
in New Orleans. Preservation Hall is 
also a school, and young musicians 
come from Japan and Europe, as 
well as all over America to learn 
how to play New Orleans Music. 
The basic recipe for New Orleans 
Music consists of five-plus 
musicians who play music that is as 
much a tradition as it is Jazz. The 
PHJB members (most of them over 
,60 years young) play their music the 
way it was once played by such 
historical greats as King Oliver, 
Johnny Dodds, and Jelly Roll 



And still there's more 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 

Dodes'Ka-Den, "The Sound Of 
the Trolley," is the film presentation 
for the coming week. It's the first 
film from Japanese director Akira 
Kurosawa in over five years, and it 
is his first color motion picture 
achievement. 

The film depicts life in a Tokyo 
slum and is described as an "af- 
firmation of life." It emphasizes the 
belief that man can overcome any 
adversity as long as he holds onto 
his dreams and hopes. 

The use of editing and bright 
color, often attaining moments of 
surrealism, does so without being 
overbearing in technique. The 
movie will be shown Tuesday, July 
23 at 8 p.m. in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. 

Professor Fred Tillis of the 
Department of Music, will be the 
featured artist at the Wednesday, 
July 24, Music Hour. Professor Tillis 
will play saxophone and will be 
accompanied by Roland Wiggins, a 
professor in the School of 



Education, on piano, and John 
Walker, a graduate student in 
Music, on trumpet. The trio's 
repertoire will primarily consist of 
works by the late Duke Ellington. 
The Music Hour will be held in the 
Campus Center Concourse be- 
tween 12 noon and 1 p.m. 

The Bicentennial Discussion 
Hour will feature Dr. Frederick 
Turner, renowned folklorist, who 
will discuss the historical influence 
and presence of Indians in this area. 
Lord Jeffery Amherst, after which 
the town was named, was quite 
influential in Indian affairs as they 
related to contact of the early 
settlers with the Indians inhabitants 
of the Pioneer Valley. In fact, one of 
the most well known incidences 
involving Lord Amherst was his gift 
of "smallpox vaccinated" blankets 
to the Indians. The informal 
discussion will be held in the 
Student Union Colonial Lounge this 
afternoon at 3 p.m. 

There will be a Hindi Indian 
movie shown in Thompson 104 on 



Friday, July 19. The movie is erv 
titled "Zanzeer", or "The Chain," 
and it is composed of "music, 
suspence, and a strong plot" 
English subtitles will be provided. 
The movie will be shown at 7:30 
p.m., and there is an admission 
charge of $1.50 per person. 
Beverages will be served during 
intermission. The film is sponsored 
by the India Association. 

The Intramural Activities 
Summer Program has scheduled a 
men's and a women's swim meet 
Entries are due Friday, July 19, and 
the meets themselves are set for 
Tuesday, July 23. Any number of 
interested persons may enter. The 
location is Boyden Pool at 6 p.m., 
and events include sprints, relays, 
and diving. 



Morton; and, they play it with as 
much vigor and joy as their 
predecessors. 

The members of the Band are: 
Billie Pierce, co-leader amd vocalist, 
who at age 15 was Bessie Smith's 
accompanist; Percy Humphrey, co- 
leader and trumpeter, the only 
member of the Band listed in Who's 
Who; Willie Humphrey, on clarinet 
who played with the Excelsior Brass 
Band, "Big Jim" Robinson, on 
trombone, who played with the 
Sam Morgan Jazz Band; Josiah 
"Cie" Frazier, on drums, who 
played for Bessie Smith; and Alan 
Jaffa, on tuba, the founder of the 
Preservation Hall. 

The audience will hear something 
that they have rarely, if ever, heard 
before; unless some of its members 
have been priviledged enough to 
have heard this band during one of 
its six previous summer 
engagements at UMass. For those 
who must miss the concert, one 
can only offer sympathy. For those 
who can attend, it should indeed be 
an unforgetable and highly erv 
joyable experience. 

In case of rain, the concert will be 
held in the Student Union Ballroom 
with UMass Summer ID hoklers 
being admitted first. In addition, the 
two to two ar>d a half hour concert 
will be divided into two shorter 
sessions at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the 
Ballroom. 

Soul dinner 

A "Soul Food Dinner" will be 
held on Friday, July 19, 1974 from 
12 noon until 7 p.m. at the Goodwin 
Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church, 41 R 
Woodside Ave., Amherst Mass. 

Store hours 

The store hours for the Textbook 
Annex will be 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 
p.m. Monday-Friday starting 
Monday, July 8 until the end of 
summer school. 



The 
Rusty Nail 

Inn 



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TOMTK — SIM) AY 



Mitch Chakour & 
The Mission Band 




f University Store ^ 



MONDAY 



Lydia Pense & 
Cold Blood.ith FAT 



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Goodfriend Coyote 



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Take Hte. 1 16 north, take left after Tennis Academy and 
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Monday - Friday 
8:30a.m. -4:30p.m. 





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lOO's 

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P»9« 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY If, m4 



THURSDAY, JULY 11, m4 



TH£ SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«9« i 



UMass prof studying monkeys 



By PA TRICK McQUAID 
Dr. Melinda Novak does not 
conduct your average summer 
session psychology class. Her 
students, although there Is a 
defrnjte behavioral similarity to 
several UMies, consist of eight 



Rhesus monkeys ranging from ages 
two to three years old. 

Located in 443 Tobin, Dr. Novak 
has been conducting experiments 
on prolonged and short-termed 
isolation with her primate pupils. 
The monkeys were taken from their 




parents at birth and raised on 
laboratory food pellets. After a year 
they were coupled for a period of 
two hours a day and at the age of 
two the animals were placed in 
groups of four; two males and two 
females. 

One group is comprised of two 
year olds and the other of three 
year olds. 

"Monkeys are unpredictable," 
said Dr. Novak, "but I certainly 
didn't expect this rate of progress. 
The animals show little sign of 
withdrawal, except for this one." 
She pointed to a small female 
squatting in the cage corner, foot- 
in-mouth. "That's Nervous Nelly; 
she likes to suck her toes." 

Sharing the same quarters with 
Nelly are Godzilla, Scarlett, and 
Stinky; so named for quite ap- 
propriate reasons. In every normal 
primate society, one male and one 
female usually assume the 
dominant character. The same is 
true in this lab. Godzilla, male, and 
Scarlett, female, have taken the 
authoritive roles. 

In another cage with four three- 
year-olds, normal social skills are 
quite evident. Stud and Miss Ugly 
play their dominant positions, 
especially in their sexual maturity. 
The average female monkey 



matures from 2 and a half to 3 and a 
half years while the average male 
lags behind until 4 or 5 years of age. 
Despite their isolation, the three- 
year-old females, Miss Ugly and 
Peanut, have acquired the normal 
sexual drives and tendencies ac- 
companied by a red rash over the 
hind and pubic area, characteristic 
of a maturing normal monkey. The 
other male. Fuzzy, does not engage 
in such an active sex role yet shows 
no signs of aggression or with- 
drawal. 

The main point of the experiment 
is the importance of peer pressure 
in the primate. In an earlier trial, 
monkeys were isolated in the first 
year of life. The social disorder 
syndrome was thought to be 
permanent. After Dr. Novak paired 
the subjects with younger 
monkeys, the isolates acquired all 
their normal social skills. 

Dr. Novak earned her degree in 
the joint fields of Zoology and 
Anthropology from the University 
of Wisconsin. There, under the 
assistance of Dr. Henry F. Harlow, 
head of the primate labs depart- 
ment, she began her work and 
studies. 

Dr. Harlow is best known for his 
work in a similar experiment on 
deprivation. Dr. Novak's work was 



mentioned in his article published 
last year in Psychology Today. She 
is submitting her findings to The 
Journal of Developmental 
Psychology and the Journal of 
Psycho Biology. 

Dr. Novak's experiments are 
proving quite successful. The 
monkeys are all maturing as they 
should be, with or without parental 
influence. The next step in the 
study is when either Miss Ugly or 
Peanut produce an offspring. Will 
they raise it as a proper mother 
should having not having had 
maternal influence themselves? Is 
this motherhood pressure inate or 
learned? Future work will show. 

Dr. Novak has received only one 
objection to her work. This was 
from a person who claimed that the 
experiments were cruel. 

"I don't strap them down or plant 
electrodes in their heads. I am very 
kind with them. I explained to this 
person that working with the 
monkeys could benefit ad- 
vancement in the mental retar- 
dation studies. She told me to 
experiment on them, so I 
discontinued communication with 
her." 



Dr. Novak with monkeys 



Photo by Jim PouRn 



UMies in tests 



BY LUIS MANUEL MEDINA 
About 10 UMass students will be 
participating as volunteers in a door 
to door campaign conducting lead 
poisoning tests" - said Ms. 
Allyson Stonefield, the campaign's 
director. 

The door to door campaign will 
be held in a ghetto housing area, 
downtown Northampton, starting 
this week until late August. 

The students are enrolled in a 
Public Health class and are being 
trained by the State Public Health 
Dept. to administer the tests. 



Patricia Keenan, UYA, is the 
campaign director's assistant. She 
will be working during the year in 
the lead poisoning tests. 

Students interested in par- 
ticipating in the campaign can do 
so, if they are willing to spend a 
minimum of four hours per week 
for this special training. For further 
information contact: Ms. Allyson or 
Ms. Patricia at 584-6863; 6890 or 
drop by at the Hampshire Neigh- 
borhood Center, (HCAC), 21 
Pleasant Street in Northampton. 



€UT« # 



ffneni 



Summer 

Entertainment 

Wednesday Friday & 
Saturday 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 
SpMM 

SUNDAY, MONDAY A 

TUESDAY 

Includes Salad Bar #^V9 

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Corner University Drive and 
Route f 








th€ 
SHOE- 

N. Pleasant St., Amherst 




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SANDAL 
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SIDEWALK SALE 



'New activism in '70' subject of workshops 



Next Monday, July 22, a series of 
workshops concerned with in- 
volving people interested in social 
change in "a new activism for the 
70' s" will begin at the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Called the Summer Organizing 
Institute, the series will run for three 



weeks on Mondays, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays and will include a free 
outdor concert on the 22nd and a 
free film festival on the 29th. The 
series is being put on by the 
Student Organizing Project, a 
group of people working to gain a 
greater role for students in 



determining the decisions which 
effect their lives in the university, 
and to encourage creative student 
activism. The workshops are 
designed to involve interested 
people in specific skills or interest 
areas and to discuss problems of 
organizing and alternatives. 




All of the activities of the In- 
stitute are open free of charge to 
any interested student or other 
member of the community. For 
further information on these ac- 
tivities, the Project can be reached 
at 545-2415, or 428 Student Union 
Building, UMass. 

Specific workshops will be: 
Organizing Alternative Com- 
munities J\\e "how to" nuts and 
bolts of organizing will be the topic 
of this workshop, with one session 
devoted to student legal rights. 811 
CC starting on Tuesday, July 23 at 
7 pm Nesta King 

Developing Economic Alter- 
nar/Ves- These workshops will be 
dealing with the problems of 
establishing alternative economic 
institutions. Starts Monday, July 
22nd 803 Campus Center 7 pm 
John Fisher 

Problems of The Student as 
Employee- A survey of the current 
economic and political situation 
and how it relates to students as 
employees. Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday-August 6 and 7 903 Campus 
Center Sessions at 1:30 and 7:00 
Alwin Schmidt 

The Medium and the Message — 
An introduction to the use of media 
for social change. Includes both 
electronic (with video) and print 
media. Starts Wednesday July 24 
803 CC 7 pm John Fisher 



The Totalitarian Classroom 
Game-What is education about 
anyway? Tuesday, July 23 (one 
session only) 905 Campus Center 
Tom Spriggs 

The Institute also includes a free 
outdoor concert and a free film 
festival. The concert will be held on 
Metawampe Lawn (behind the 
Student Union) on the UMass 
campus July 22nd. It will feature 
Open Road Band, Little Fire, 
Jacktar and others. The film 
festival will be held in the Campus 
Center Auditorium on July 29th and 
the tentative program includes 
"The Magical Mystery Tour" 
(Beetle); Films on Columbia and 
Kent State; "The Women's Film"; 
"Harvest of Shame" (Farm 

Workers) and many others. Both of 
these activities will start at 1 in the 
afternoon and continue indefinitely. 



...thoughts seem to go on forever. 



Crime rate here 
jumps from 73 



The UMass Director of Security 
announced this week a 150 per cent 
increase in criminal complaints 
received during the month of June. 

David L. Johnston said his 
department received 80 complaints 
relating to criminal actions com- 
pared to 32 received in June of 73. 
He said he has "no good ex- 
planation" for the increase. 

The security director said the 
UMass police investigated 16 
larcenies over 100 dollars. The 
remainder of complaints received 
breaks down as follows: 6 breaking 
and enterings; 4 acts of vadalism; 2 
assault and battery cases; 3 driving 
under the influence of liquor; 2 
criminal violations of motor vehicle; 
1 default warrant and other 
miscellaneous violations. 

Johnston also noted that the 
number of criminal complaints 
received jumped from 735 during 



Jan '73 to June of '73 to 1008 
during Jan to June of this vear- 
about a 25 percent increase. 

He said the UMass police 
department now has three 
detectives rather than two. He said 
the men have been working hard 
and have organizationally im- 
proved. 

Johnston said four new police 
officers, including one woman, 
have joined the department. 

Johnston's statements, made 
Monday, came on the same day a 
15 percent increase of crime in the 
U.S. was announced by federal law 
enforcement officials. 

Baha'i group 

Informal gatherings every 
Tuesday night at 8 p.m., 64 Van 
Meter Drive. Everyone is welcome. 




Wearing his beard 
disguise, this week's 
mystery person enjoys 
wide acclaim. The first 
person to identify the 
photograph to the 
editors in room 422 of 
the Student Union wins 
a free beer. 

For the second time, 
last week's winner was 
Jack Margosian who 
correctly identified 
Alice Cooper. 





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THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1W4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pag* 7 



P»9« 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY II, 1974 



Pats say better year here 



(Continued from P. 1) 

not completely satisfied with the 
season but that his team "made 
real progress in terms of at- 
titude.. ..and positive strides in 
upgrading our overall personnel." 

Fairbanks said the Patriots must 
improve their running game this 
year. He feels, however, that the 
offensive team "did a reasonably 
good job last year." 

The defense, he felt, was 
relatively weak but tried to strike a 
positive note by adding that the 
Patriots allowed their opponents 
146 fewer points than in the 
previous season. 

Fairbanks must be making some 
of last year's defensive starters a 
little nervous. "I would expect," he 
said, "there will be some real 
healthy competition for places on 
the 1974 roster in our defensive 
secondary. It also appears there is a 
possibility of increased competition 
for the linebacker positions." 

Last year was his first year as a 
professional football coach and he 
said this will be the second year of 



his rebuilding program. "I think the 
most important area we can direct 
our attention to will be the im- 
provement of our already young 
team. The second segment of our 
development program is that we 
are on a constant lookout to 
acquire new talent in addition to the 
draft choices." 

Two UMass graduates are 
hoping to be included in Fairbanks' 
"new talent" list. Wide receiver 
Steve Schubert played with the 
Colonials after starring here. 

John Hulecki also played on the 
New England Colonial's team after 
three straight selections for the all- 
East team while starring here. 

The two UMass grads, and in- 
deed the other free agents, will 
have to do a lot of impressing to 
make the Patriot squad — 
assuming, of course, the strike is 
eventually settled and the veterans 
return to the team. 

Meanwhile, Coach Fairbanks 
notes the 1<*74 season will probably 
be "the most demanding in our 
club's history." They must play 




both Super Bowl teams (Miami 
twice, Minnesota once) and such 
playoff teams as Oakland, Los 
Angeles and Pittsburgh. 

The Coach makes no win-loss 
predictions, merely saying his club 
will be an improved one. 



Photo bv Stow* RuQslM 



Rucker top receiver 



'73 Pat stats 




jmn 



The New England Patriots 
finished third in the AFL's Eastern 
Division last year with a 5 and nine 
record. They scored 258 points 
while their opponents registered 
300. They scored about 70 points in 
each quarter except the first when 
they only scored 48 points. 

Quarterback Jim Plunkett 
completed 193 of 376 attempts, 
51.3 per cent, for 2,550 yards. He 
threw 17 interceptions. Kicker Jeff 
White led the team in scoring with 
63 points. He was followed by Jim 
Plunkett and running back Sam 
Cunningham who each scored 30 
points. 

On kickoff returns it was mostly 
Mack Herron who averaged 26.6 
yards on 41 returns. 

Reggie Rucker was the team's 



top receiver. He caught 53 passes 
for 743 yards. Bob Windsor was 
second with 23 catches for 348 
yards. 

The Pat's top rusher last year 
was Sam Cunninghem who ran for 
516 yards in 155 carries for a 3.3 
average. John Tarver averaged 4.5 
yards in 72 carries for 321 yards. 

Ron Bolton had the most in- 
terceptions, six. Sandy Durko 
grabbed three and Ralph Anderson 
stole one. 

Bruce Barnes, their punter, 
averaged 38.8 yards a boot. Jeff 
White only punted three times 
averaging 27.1 yards. 

There were 27 team records set 
last season, including most fumbles 
per season (51); fewest penalties 
per season (50); fewest total first 



Mosakowski in race 



downs allowed in a season (215); 
most yards allowed rushing in a 
game (360, Buffalo); fewest pass 
completions allowed in a game (0, 
NY Jets); and fewest touchdowns 
allowed by passing in a season (11). 

Individual records set in the '73 
season include: most punt returns 
in a season (Mack Herron, 27); 
most season pass receptions (53) 
by Reggie Rucker; and Ron Bolton 
tied six other players by making an 
interception in three consecutive 
games. 

Individual "superlatives" of the 
past season include: longest kickoff 
return (92 yd, TD) by Mack Herron; 
Ron Bolton had the longest in- 
terception return (56 yds, 
Philadelphia); Josh Ashton had the 
most rushes in a game last year (19, 
Philadelphia); the longest scoring 
pass was from Plunckett to Rucker 
(63 yds) against Green Bay. 




.../^DM£lCH,N\fc«y\/pf^/ 




HPleasancst.M\en3C 



(Continued from P. 1) 

the allocation of money is the basic 
problem hurting the country. He 
says he'd like to re-allocate the 
money for something useful to the 
country on a long-term basis. 

"I'd cut some of the 
wastefulness out of the military 
budget," he said. He says, 
however, that it would be absurd to 
abolish the military. 

Mosakowski says he is qualified 
to fill the Congressional position 
because he "understands 
government," He has been a 
consistent, unpaid Washington 
lobbier against the Vietnam War 
and the draft. 

He said he would definitely vote 
for the President's impeachment. "I 
think it's evident he's violated his 
constitutional oath. It all comes 
down to that point ... He's 
destroyed whatever credibility the 
Presidency might have had." 



The UMass graduate said he 
would also like to close many tax 
loopholes. "They favor people with 
a lot of capital ... There's at least 
200 millionaires who pay no taxes 
(legally) at all." 

Mosakowski is also concerned 
with Vietnam veterans. He claims 
the Nixon administration has been 
abandoning the vets in many areas. 

"Yet the Nixon administration," 
he said, "continues to throw away 
a billion tax dollars to support 
Thieu's fascist dictatorship in 
Saigon, instead of using the money 
for veterans' job training at home." 

Mosakowski was an early 
supporter of George McGovern's 
bid for the presidency. He was 
elected as one of six first 
congressional district delegates to 
the 1972 Democratic National 
Convention. 



a (• 



BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of- 
fering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conciitions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two-sided 
copies* (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Vi cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copymg onto one side only, add Vi cent per copy. 




i^SmaAVroadwa^ tM^^ 



PRESENT 

U Mass suiviivier actIvItIes 1974 



July 31 august 1-2-3 
8pm Bowker Aud. UMass 



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FOR RESERVATIONS 



$3 all others 

A CONNECTICUT MUSIC THEATRE PRODUCTION 



Cultural groups receive grants 



Senator John W. Olver an- 
nounced recently that seven 
cultural organizations in the 
Franklin- Hampshire District have 
received grants from the Massa- 
chusetts Council on the Arts and 
Humanities totaling $22,425. 

The recipients are: Historic 
Deerfield, Inc., $5,500; Greenfield 
Community College, $4,825; 
Leverett Craftsmen and Artists, 
Inc., $3,500; Pioneer Valley Ballet 
Guild of Northampton, $600; 
Greenwood Music Camp of 



Ci^mmington, $1,000; "Massa- 
chusetts Review", University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, $5,000; 
and Five Colleges, Inc. 
headquartered in Amherst, $2,000. 
"These grants," Senator Olver 
said, "will help these organizations 
continue to produce programs of 
cultural value and interest for the 
people of Western Massachusetts. 
A variety of programs will be 
available including lectures, ballet, 
drama, crafts workshops, concerts 
and art classes." 




...he said to me, "Candy is dandy, but liquor is 

C|Uicker!" Photo by Oav* L« 

Alliance on racism 



by BLACK NEWS SERVICE 

The Western Mass. delegation to 
the North Carolina demonstration 
against racism and repression on 
July 4th was made up of mostly 
UMass. students and a few 
Springfield and Holyoke com- 
munity members. There were many 
others, however, who did not go 
down, but who made generous 
contributions toward paying for the 
bus and over 100 people who 
showed their solidarity at the pot 
luck supper held at New Africa 
House. 
So the marchers from our area 

Resuscitation 
course offered 



What is the response of the 
average person to a medical 
emergency? In most cases, when 
the situation calls for more than 
stopping bleeding or knowing when 
to call a doctor, the individual is at a 
loss. More than 650,000 people die 
yearly of heart disease, and about 
350,000 of these deaths occur 
outside the hospital. It seems 
probable that a large number of 
these deaths can be prevented by 
prompt, appropriate treatment. In 
addition, many victims who die as a 
result of such accidents as 
drowning, electrocution, etc., could 
be saved by the proper application 
of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It 
is the feeling of the National 
Conference on CPR and ECC that 
the general public should be taught 
such techniques. 

The Health Education Division of 
the University Health Services is 
offering a six-hour workshop in 
cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. It 
will be held Thursday evening, July 
25th, and the following Tuesday 
evening, July 30th, from 6:30 to 
9:30. The CPR workshop is a Heart 
Association course intended to 
instruct lay people in both mouth- 
to- mouth resuscitation and closed 
chest massage. 

Although there is no charge and 
there are no prerequisites for the 
course, it will be limited to twelve 
students. Participants should plan 
on attending the full six hours. 
Contact the Health Education 
Division to register for the 
workshop: telephone, 549-2671. 



represented a great number of 
people who understood that the 
fight against racism and repression 
was not only restricted ' to North 
Carolina but even right here in 
Western Mass. campuses and 
communities. 

The fight against hostility 
towards students in Amherst, 
especially Third World Students, 
police harassment and brutality in. 
Springfield, make it imperative for 
the establishment of a branch of 
the National Alliance Against Racist 
and Political Repression. 

This Sunday at Hope Church at 5 
p.m. there will be a preliminary 
meeting for all people who wish to 
discuss what issues an Alliance 
here could work on and how it 
could be formed. Members of 
church, student and labor groups, 
men and women of all colors and 
many different political beliefs are 
expected to attend. 

Everyone who agrees that racism 
and repression must stop and that 
only unity can do it, are warmly 
invited. Come, share your skills and 
perspective, listen and talk. If you 
need transportation to Springfield 
contact the Student Organizing 
Project at 545-0341 or Black News 
Service at 545-0794 or We the 
People, WMUA, 545-2876. 



The grant to Historic Deerfield, 
Inc. will be used for the "American 
Revolution Lecture Series", the 
"Historic Energy Sources 
Program" and a study on economic 
life in Western Massachusetts. 

The Greenfield Community 
College money will be divided as 
follows: 

- $1,500 for studio classes open to 
residents of Franklin County in the 
technique of lost wax casting. 

- $3,325 for the production of 
"J.B." under the guidance of 



playwright Archibald Macleash 
with guest performer Leonard 
Nimoy. 

The grant to Leverett Craftsmen 
and Artists, Inc. will help produce a 
series of lectures and workshops 
for the general public and 
professional craftsmen and artists. 

The Pioneer Valley Ballet Guild 
will use its grant for the production 
of an original ballet based on the 
books of Massachusetts author 
Jane Yolen Stemple and 
choreographed by Gail Giere 



Collins. The ballet will be perfom^ed 
at elementary schools throughout 
the Pioneer Valley. 

The UMass publication "Massa- 
chusetts Review" will use its grant 
for a Bicentennial publication of 
essays, historical documents and 
art work which reflect the traditions 
of both Massachusetts and the 
nation as a whole. 

Assistance by the Massachusetts 
Council on Arts and Humanities is 
generally made on a 50-50 match- 
ing basis. 



Local editor loses job 
after residency dispute 



ByMIKEKNEELAND 
The publisher of the Amherst 
Record has terminated his 
managing editor's contract for his 
refusal to live in Amherst or an 
adjacent town. 

Publisher Michael J. de Sherbinin 
defended his actions saying, "I 
think it is a necessity for reporters 
and editors to live in the towns we 
serve, so they can get to know the 
people there, and report on their 
activities." 

V. Michael Bradley, who left his 
managing editor's position 
Saturday, said he's "always 
disagreed with that sort of old 
school thing." Bradley claims a 
good reporter need not live in the 



comrr.unity to do a good job 
repotting it. 

"As long as you can do a job 
well, you should be able to live 
where you want," Bradley told the 
Solstice. 

Bradley's legal residence is 
Natick. During the week he has 
been living in a local apartment 
complex but recently decided to 
buy a house. 

He located a house in Orange he 
particularly liked. In Amherst, he 
said, that same house and its 
property would have been 25 per 
cent higher. In towns adjacent to 
Amherst, the cost would have been 
15 per cent higher he said. He said 
the house is about 15 miles from 



Amherst. 

Bradley became the first 
managing editor of the bi-weekly 
newspaper in Jan. He established 
beats, deadlines and has begun a 
series of in-depth stories which will 
be printed soon. He held weekly 
news meeting with his staff and 
was highly regarded by empkiyees 
there. 

"I still have good feelings about 
the pap>er," Bradley said. "Com- 
pared to other weekly p>apers, this 
paper isn't mediocre — It stands 
out head and shoulders." 

De Sherbinin appointed Robert 
Blossom, a record employee since 
1970, to act as the temporary 
managing editor until the new 
managing editor is picked in Sept. 



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THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY li, 1«74 



THURSDAY, JULY II, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 9 



Black Cultural 

Center 
Benefit 



July 13-14 are unforgettable days 
in Annherst. The community was 
exposed to the first ever Black 
Cultural Center's Benefit held in the 
Amherst Commons. There were tag 
sales, music fashion shows and of 
course children rides. Two fulfilling 
days. Thanks to AISHAH RAH- 
MAN and the Steering Committee 
for doing a good job. 




Photo* by Ed Cohon 















Blg names at Tanglewood 



The third weekend of the 
Berkshire Festival at Tanglewood 
opens on Friday evening, July 19 at 
7 p.m. with pianist Raymond 
Lewenthal performing 19th century 
romantic music. At 9 p.m. Eugen 
Jochum conducts the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in an All 
Brahms program. The concert 
opens with the Piano Concerto no. 
2 in B flat with soloist Hans Richter- 
Haaser. The closing work of the 
evening is the Brahms Symphony 
no. 2 in D. 

On Saturday evening at 8:30 p.m. 
Eugen Jochum conducts 
Schubert's Svmohonv no. 8 in B 
minor "Unfinished" and Bruckner's 
Symphony no. 4 in E flat 
"Romantic". 

On Sunday afternoon at 2:30, 
Leonard Bernstein conducts the 
Boston Symphony in works of 
Mahler, Hindemith, Ravel and 
Tchaikovsky. The concert opens 
with Mahler's "Adagietto" from 
Symphony no. 5 in C sharp minor 
(In memory of Serge Koussevitzky) 
followed by Hindemith's Kon- 
zertmusik for Strings and Brass. 
The Ravel Piano Concerto in G 
follows, performed by Leonard 
Bernstein and the concert closes 
with Tchaikovsky's Symphony no. 
5 in E minor. 

Eugen Jochum celebrated his 
seventieth birthday in November, 



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1972. A native of Babenhausen, 
South Germany, he studied at the 
Augsburg Conservatory, and later 
at the Munich Academy of Music. 
After a short stint as repetiteur in 
Munchen-Gladbach, he conducted 
his first concert, a program of 
music by Beethoven and Bruckner, 
in 1926 at Munich. He was im- 
mediately offered the post of 
second conductor at the Kiel 
Opera, and after a year in Mann- 
heim became principal conductor 
in Duisburg. Between 1931 and 1933 
he was principal conductor of the 
Berlin Radio Symphony and guest 
conductor of the Berlin Philhar- 
monic. Then in 1934 Eugen Jochum 
began his fifteen-year tenure as 
Music Director of the Hamburg 
State Opera in succession to Karl 
Muck, former Conductor of the 
Boston Symphony, and Karl Bohm. 
In 1949 he founded the Bavarian 
Radio Philharmonic, which he 
shaped into one of Europe's finest 
orchestras. Twelve years later he 
became conductor, with Bernard 
Haitink, of the Concertgebouw in 
Amsterdam. Eugen Jochum's 
many recordings are on the 
Deutsche Grammophon and Philips 
labels. In recent years he has won 
international awards for his records 
of the St. Matthew and St. John 
Passions of Bach. He made his first 



appearances with the Boston 
Symphony in the 1972-1973 winter 
season in Symphony Hall. 

Hans Richter-Haaser was born in 
Dresden, Germany where he 
received his early musical training 
and where, at the age of eighteen, 
he was awarded the Becf)stein 
Prize. After the War his family 
moved to Detmold where he 
became Professor of Master 
Classes in Piano at the State Music 
Academy and conductor of the 
local symphony. He remained there 
through 1947 when he resumed his 
concert career. Hans Richter- 
Haaser has performed throughout 
Europe, the Orient, North and 
South America, South Africa and 
Australia. He has appeared with all 
jhe major orchestras of the world, 
among them tiie Concertgebouw 
Orchestra of Amsterdam, the New 
Philharmonia Orchestra of London, 
the Stuttgart Philharmonic, the 
Hamburg Philharmonic and the 
Berlin Philharmonic. In the United 
States he has appeared with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic, the San 
Francisco Symphony, the Pitts- 
burgh Symphony, the Cleveland 
Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony 
and the New York Philharmonic. 
Hans Richter-Haaser made his 
American debut at Tnwwn Mali ;n 



1959. aince that time he has made 
fifteen consecutive tours of this 
country. 

As Laureate Conductor of the 
New York Philharmonic, Leonard 
Bernstein continues his close 
association with that orchestra. 
Appointed its Music Director in 
1958, he was the first conductor 
born and trained in America to hold 
the post. His thousandth concert 
with the orchestra took place on 
December 15, 1971. This past year 



he conducted a Vatican concert 
honoring the tenth anniversary of 
the accession of Pope Paul VI; 
attended the European premiere of 
Mass. a theater piece written for 
the opening of the John F. Ken- 
nedy Center; delivered a series of 
lectures at Harvard, where he was 
Charles Eliot Norton Professor ot 
Poerty; and wrote a ballet score 
Dybbuk Variations. 



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Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1W4 



THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pag* 11 



Program helps young delinquents 



There's more 
to a bicycle 

than the name 

on the frame. 




BLACK NEWS SERVICE 

BySADARECORADIN 
The Massachusetts Association 
for Reintergration of Youths 
(M.A.R.Y.) Program, works with 
juvenile delinquents, mostly on a 
one to one basis to intergrate them 
back into their communities. 



According to its director the goal of 
the program is to provide alter- 
native activities so that the youths 
can handle themselves in a 
responsible manner when con- 
fronted with situations of a criminal 
nature. 
The most important part of the 



program explains Lynn Nicholas, 
who is essentially the program's 
backbone, is the youths-student 
advocate relationship. Last year, 
the M.A.R.Y. program only had 10 
youths. This year the program has 
increased to 14 youths. 

Speaking on the evolution of the 



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program, Lynn Nicholas states that 
"3 and one- half years ago, the state 
of Massachusetts decided through 
the guidance of Jerome Miller to 
change the institution of children. 
He found that he could not work 
from the inside. Therefore, he 
closed them down. The civil service 
employees for fear of losing their 
jobs, responded insensitively to the 
children. As a result of these 
changes within the institution, 
University of Massachusetts 
students drove up to Lyman 
School, and took 100 children - 
which was called the J.O.E. 
conference. 

Ms. Lynn stated that in the 
beginning there was little super- 
vision due to lack of experience. It 
had to be structured with a base, 
and it also had to be financially 
supported. A proposal was drawn 
up of which eventually became the 
M.A.R.Y. Program." 

During the summer, according to 
an advocate it is difficult to keep 
the children from getting bored. 
Dwight Tavada, coordinator and 
house father, agrees with this 
statement. "It is hard for the kids 
during the summer. There is no 
structured daily activities. We are 
trying to work on jobs through the 
Neighborhood Youth Corps. 
(N.Y.C.) We also do individual 
tutoring since the alternative school 
is closed for the summer." 




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By STELLA WILDER 
July 20-26 

Earthly happenings reveal a 
pattern of movement strongly 
reflective of that to be observed in 
celestial bodies over the next six or 
seven days. Be prepared early in the 
week for encounters with com- 
petitors which require you to be 
be more "with it" than usual in- 
willingness to work is concerned. 
There are benefits to be gained — 
but they are benefits which also can 
be irretrievably lost through 
carelessness, a failure in self- 
appreciation, or, conversely, a 
failure in the observation of the 
limits of talents and abilities. 

Correct the impression of ab- 
solute steadfastness in all things 
and you will approach an area of 

Ecology films 

The Coalition for Environmental 
Quality will show two free ecology 
films tonight in Room 903 of the 
Campus Center at 6 p.m. Everyone 
is invited to attend. 

"Planning for Floods" is a sequel 
to "Flooding River". It explains why 
traditional flood "prevention" 
usually causes greater flooding and 
why an understanding of river 
dynamics requires the nation to 
change policies which are now 
known to be self-defeating. 

"The Grand Canyon" is a Sierra 
Club film showing the beauty and 
awesomeness of this great natural 
wonder. 

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UNIVERSITY STORE 

Campus Center, Univeriity of 
Mds.iachusetts, Ainhersi, Mass. 01002 

<413I 545 2619 



Your Week/y Stars 



understanding between you and 
those who can be of help to you in 
your career and in your private life. 
As the stars and planets develop, 
age, and change, so must all earthly 
beings - including you. Use the 
coming week to make yourself and 
others aware of recent changes in 
your life, recent developments in 
your thinking. 

Emulate those whose egos are 
healthy enough to allow them not 
only to recognize but to express 
openly their own worth. This is the 
week for giving others an op- 
portunity to see you at your best, to 
admire your originality and 
productivity. 

CANCER (June 21 -July 7) - 
Make the best use of all available 
funds this week. Remember, 
however, that to borrow is to ask 
for trouble, if not now, then later. 
(July 8-July 22) - Careful con- 
sultation with all those who have a 
stake in your future should lead you 
to the prope/ conclusions where 
new proposals are concerned. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 7) - Take 
care that those friends you are 
excluding from your presence — 
though only temporarily — are not 
precisely those who could help you 
most. (Aug. 8-Aug. 22) - Be sure 
you receive all you are entitled to 



over the next few days. Otherwise, 
you may find yourself wanting by 
week's end. 

Unless you are willing to give full 
time to a proposed new project, 
you might do well to put off even 
considering it — for the time being. 
(Sept. 8-Sept. 22) - Be sure that 
any who come to you with requests 
for material help are authorized to 
do so. Don't trust any who fail to 
show identification. 

/./fl/?/»(Sept. 23-Oct. 7) - Refer 
all inquiries regarding your past to 
those willing to give you a good 
report. Don't overstep the bounds 
of propriety. (Oct. 8-Oct. 22) - 
Indicate to others your willingness 
to serve in community enterprises 
and the degree to which you will 
participate in money-raising ac- 
tivities. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - 
Make sure that all your major 
activities this week are interrelated. 
Otherwise, you may end the week 
with many loose or tangled ends. 
(Nov. 8-Nov. 21) - Give detailed 
information regarding your finances 
or you cannot expect to receive 
material help from those able to 
come to your assistance. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 7) 
- Personal expenses may surprise 
you this week. Make sure you have 
enough left over at the end of the 



week to begin the next week well. 
(Dec. 8-Dec. 21) - Keep close tabs 
on your expenditures over the 
coming week, as you may be asked 
for an accounting. Don't expect to 
receive something for nothing. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- Jan. 5) - 
You may wish to modify your 
expectations but you must not try 
to modify your present mmterial 
assets.'Allow finances to stand pat 
(Jan. 6- Jan. 19) - If you would 
effectuate ' the purposes of gifts 
granted by others, turn all your 
talents and attention to carrying out 
new plans of action. 

AOUARIUS (Jan. 2C-Feb. 3) - 
Complete present projects as 
quickly — and effectively — as 
possible. Don't allow others to 
confuse present issues with new 
ones. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) - Abide by 
all present laws when it comes to 
buying or selling. You could easily 
land in difficulties if you are talked 
into acting otherwise. 

PISCES (Feb. 19- March 5) - 
Don't confuse aggressiveness with 
courage. What you may feel when 
faced with the competition may not 
be exactly what you'd hoped to 
feel. (March 6- March 20) - You 
can gain your point by week's end if 
you will take the time and trouble to 
be as charming in the home as you 
are outside it. 



>4WfS( March 21 -April 4) - You 
would be wise to take a more 
objective view of what youngsters 
may threaten. You can be of little 
help if you become overly excited. 
(April 5- April 19) — Developing 
talent may cause others some 
concern, but it should give you 
virtually what amounts to a new 
lease on life. Be optimistic. 

TAURUS (April 20- May 5) - 
Ingenuity is one thing, short-cuts 
are another. The former can ac- 
tually create gain for you this week; 
the latter may result in loss. (May 6- 
May 20) — Don't expect outsiders 
to find you as fascinating or as 
lovable as those nearest and 
dearest to you ultimately do. Make 
the effort to get charm across. 

GEMINI (May 21 -June 6) - An 
active and highly perceptive mind 
precludes any failure this week. Do 
your best when haste, though it 
may make waste, could make 
considerable gain. Do what you can 
to lessen another's anxiety toward 
the week's end. 



m^ 



AMHERSTCHIIIESEFOO 



62 Main St., Amherst 
Tel. 253-7835 
EAT IN OR TAKEOUT 
Lunch Specials 99c 8. up 





MM 



SEIDEM^ SOUND 




Turn Your Summer Times 

into Good Times witli a 

Turntable from LafayettOi 



GARRARD 




(Includes MS Base 
and Dust Cover) 



Zero 100 



WAS 


NOW 


'^® $151.85 
1 


Mir 


$119.95 


S3400 


$69.95 


*5?" 


$89.95 


'68°" 


$169.95 


M2r 


$209.95 


Msr 



DUAL 



« » 



All Models Include 
Base <fr Dust Cover 



Model 1229 

Model 1218 
Model 1216 



$349.85 

$268.95 
$214.90 



'225" 
'149" 
'128" 



BSR 




SIO/X 



All Models Include 
Base & Dust Cover 



310 AXE 
510 AXE 
610 AXE 
710 AXE 
810 AXE 



$59.95 
$74.95 

$99.95 
$149.95 

$229.95 



145- 

'59"* 

Msr 



LAFAYETTE RADIO ELECTRONICS 

SEIDEN-SOUNO 



masiet ctiatg* 







Amherst Store 
15 E. Pleasant St. 

(Next To The Pub) 



OTHER STORES 

ALBANY. N.Y. PITTSFIELD. MASS. 



SCHENECTADY. N.Y. 
GLEM FALLS. NY. 



COLONIE. N.Y. 
UTICA, N.Y. 



Pag* 12 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY II; W4 



THURSDAY, JULY W, W4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pa«* 13 



H'l'v'OCOCClOC 



Stop & Shop 

Coffee 

1 lb. Can 

ALL GRINDS 



^^ ^^ 246 ^1 



Skippy 
Peanut 
Butter 

28 oz. Jar 



99* 

^^ ^^ 248: 



WITH THIS COUPON AND A (5 PURCHASE 

I p(f cuslonwi G<KKl Mon . July IS - Sat . July 20 



WITH THIS COUPON AND A J5 PURCHASE 
Limil •■• |ar pef customer Good Mon July IS - Sat July 20 



% Clorox 
i Gallon 
^ Bleach 

>^ 1 Gallon Jug 

"^ WITH THIS COUPON AND A $5 PURCHASE 

Limit IN |«| per customer Good Mon July 1 5 - Sal July 20 




gC Limit •••e«ip«fCuslom«i Good Mon. July IS -Sat. July 20 •^\^>- Limit •« |ir pet customer oooo won juiy i a - aai auiy « Z^*^^ — i^x -■ • -^ 



Countryfine 

Cheese 

SPREAD 

Slices 

INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED 



89 

1 6 oz. Package ' 



hT Any or all coupon* may b4 radoamad with only ona $5 purchaaa 

^1 Tost a salad . . . and make a meal! 

I We've got the recipe for a hearty macaroni salad in this week's "Con- 

1 sumerisms". And to guide you to more healthful salads, there's a handy 

I chart showing the nutritional contributions of the most popular salad 

I ingredients. Read the straight talk on Produce and Prices, tips on buying 

I and serving fresh peaches. Get your free "Consumerisms" at Stop & Shop. 



: WITH THIS COUPON AND A J5 PURCHASE -^ 

; Limit mt p«cka|e per customer Good Mon . July 15 Sat July 20 .^ 



Get your 




Stop & Shop 

1/2 Gal. 
Sherbet 

Vj Gal. Cent. - Assl. Flav 



av^^ ^^^ 250 



WITH THIS COUPON AND A »5 PURCHASE .^ 

- Limit Mi tMlalMf per customer Good Mon .July IS -Sal , July « :5^ 

FREE! 

S$: Drink Mix 



■^ 



ASSORTED FLAVORS -3 OZ. PKG. 236 | 

: WITH THIS COUPON AND A $5 PURCHASE 

- Limit Ml )ack>|« per customer Good Mon July 1 S - Sal July 20 



StobiifSahapsw orth ! 



Stop & Shop "White Gem U.S. Grade "A 



white 





At this low mmi-price 
you'll come a'running 
When you buy U.S. Grade 
"A". White Gem chickens, 
you buy the sweetest 
tasting chicken that 
money can buy. 



Cut up or Split 2^1-3 lbs 4S., 




Whole 
IVi to 3 lbs 




Sttrtt Monday, July 1 S - Saturday, July 20 



(ifms o"nt(( f»' Ml* tot 

ivaiiah'f <n cj*f lot'> 0' 

le oiti»( rtiai) Mai*ft 

Of Mrietcsilfl'i 



Great steaks for the b arbec ue grill! 

Broil«#59 




SHOULDER STEAK 

Great beef! Stop & Shop ■Quality-Prolected " beef! We let our beef 

age naturally in our spotless, federally inspected meat plant, til it's tender, 

juicy and flavorful. Serve London Broil steak for your dinner. 




lb. 



Bottom Round Steak '"'"""i H? Top Sirloin Steak 1 



S179 



Tenderettes Beef Steak 



INDIVIDUALLY CUBED STEAKS $179 
FROM THE ROUND 



T 



Cook-up a c€X}k-out and get barbecue goodness, mini-priced^ 

lit Ground Beef 




•Simply Sup«r lean ground beef is not less than 76% lean 

, Every cook wants great ground beef. 
! Stop & Shops Simply Super gives you a 
' consistency of quality in fresh ground beef 
that you can buy only at Stop & Shop. 





VHIUH 



\ 



El ^rf^ %% IE5F| il£n 



Bigmini-oriced® 
savings milieallh 
and beauty aids. 

Lavoris Mouthwash QQ^ 

32 Oi Bottle Stock up at ttiis low mir\i-price- ^ ^^ 

Palmolive Rapid Shave 59^ 

1 t ai Aerosol Can ** ^^ 

Wella Balsam £». QQ<= 

HAIR CONDITIONER — REG oi EXTRA BODY W W 

Lady Flicker Razor h, RQ^ 

Designed especially (or teminine needs ^^ ^^ 

Crest Toothpaste T°pe ggc 



REGULAR OR MINT 



Cool tubals from SUKp&ShapH 



Summer Kitchen! 



When you make our kitchen 
your summer kitchen, you II save hours of cooking time with our 

delicious home-made tasting foods. 



0^ Fully Cooked Chickens 

^^jr ROASTED OR BARBECUE STYLJ 

21b. Potato Salad 

Twin Submarine Sandwich 



WHITE 
GEM 



2 LB. COLE SLAW OR 
2 LB. MACARONI SALAD 



Ready made picnic 



AVAILABIE IN STORES fEATURlNQ * SEflVlCf Of I i 



Imported Honey Glazed Ham 

"QualityProtected" Roast Beef 

Macaroni and Beet 

Tuna. Ham or Ctiicken Salad 



SSt English IVIuffins 

Cinnamon Coffee Cake^'°|,jr'' i -i 
Stop & Shop Italian Bread s< »' 
Stop a Shop Vienna Bread ',?.; 39° 
Stop & Shop Apple Pie 

Buttercrest Sliced Bread 

ST0P4SH0P- YAH-YAH WHITE 



795 
89^. 

:. 69' 

^i 89' 

79^. 

: 89' 

SL-M TOUT vm i siioi»worK_J 



Great 
Eating! 



Sliced to order 



New from our kitchan. Delicious! 



S; Mtnl-Prtced Quick I Easi Moatt 

ilalian Sausage 

PERRI BRAND - HOT OR SWEET J4 39 

Delicious barbecued with peppers. I no 
a must in your spaghetti sauce I Pko 



IWl-Hul specials 



AVAILABLE IN STORES FEATURING A SERVICE OEll 

Nepco Cold Cuts 

99! 




^ 



SLICED TO ORDER 

LUNCHEON P»P 
OLIVE OR MOCK CHICKEN 



Arrid Deodorant 3r: ''^^ ^V^ 

A low mini-pnce on a great national brand ■ 

Bayer Aspirin ^oSSiir »1™ 

Get your Stop 4 Shopsworth' 

Plastic Strips 9 ^- Q9^ 

Slops Shop Low mini-price- ^ "** WW 

Cotton Swabs 9 ^z. QQ<^ 

STOP & SHOP BRAND ^ ^^ W W 

Baby Shampoo '^"::rc:r QQc 

JOHNSON & X)HNSON- 1 1 02 Plastic Btl ^^ 

Johnson's Baby Powder QQ<^ I 

24 02 Plastic Container W W I 



Italian Loaf Bf^cx forest brand v, ic 59° 
D.A.K. Imptd. Danish Salami :; >1" 
Finnish Swiss Cheese Z M"* 



QuicK. easy Summer supper! 



SQjMi'-^i^ ^^ Si>*cii!l 



Swansdown Cake Mixes 3 



tcin 



Pugs ' 

I Oil «~ 

16 0! 

loal 



Libbys Ketchup ;'„„°,'. 

Stop & Shop Salad Dressing "j.°' 
Carnation Coffee Mate ' 'j,°' 

La Choy Soy Sauce ^°^4 

La Choy Chow Mein Noodles ^(^„°' 
La Choy Chow Mein-Bi-Pack'^;V' 

'iHBIMl CMiCHfN OR BEEF 

Muellers Elbow Macaroni '^^ 



31' 
85* 
69* 
39* 
39* 
»1" 

39* 



Turbot Fillets "°"^ 89i. 

Eldorado Salad Shrimp '^'H 99* 
Cooked Fish Cakes taste osca '^ 69* 

fl Miii-fiicad DUrvlMeitt I 

Swiss Style Yogurt 
3-89^ 




il MWPl iCH BlllWFmilltl 

Minute Maid Orange Juice 



rt.?;'- 



W^' 




A 100% Orange Juice i| A| 
f< from Florida. L&M 

y Mini-priced''. 12 oz. Can "f ^ 



UJ 69* 
»1 



3ieoi 
Pkg* 



HOOD - ASST. FLAVORS 

A tasty between meal 
snack . . . perfect tor dessert. 



100% ORANGE JUICE 3;u 9A| 
Com *«» 



Sun Glory from Florida 
Breakstone Cottage Cheese 'c'o^f 



59* 



Borden Amer. Cheese ^'i^ Vl 89* 



»fuOW OR WHITE 

Riggio Sliced Mozzarella 



Siicn Ptg 



Boi 

Ptg 



59* 



Sparkool Pink Lemonade xeep piemy on hand 

Shoestring Potatoes, Slim Jim Brand 

Bridgeford Bread Dough Mim priced* 

Eggo Blueberry Waffles a tasty breakfast treat '^^ 49* 

Fairlane Chopped Spinach 7 '^. M 

Stock the freezer at this low mini-price*. 
Eggo French Toast serve with deticiout sausage 

Mighty High Strawberry Shortcake 

Stop & Shop Fish Sticks -)">< heat and aerve. 

Taste O'Sea Haddock Dinner 

Taste O'Sea Haddock or Flounder Fillets 



UT 65* 

»oi tlN 

X 79* 
« 59* 

1(01 tMW 



A big loaf tor plenty of 
sandwiches Mmi-priced' 



2?4 0, $1 
LOIvfS I 



"0/ 

Wg 
Soi 
Pkg 

13 
Pligi 



65* 



Homestyle Spice Cake sop « shop 

Stop & Shop Orange Cake 

Stop & Shop Pound Cake ,':„Vf 2 '4°.' »1 



15 o: 5gc 



Fresh from our Garden of Eatinl 

^^V^ Freestone ^ ^ki 

JVeadies3> 




Swanson Entrees 



d^lealball 9Vi oi . Meatioaf 9 oi . Friad 
Chicken 7 oi . Turkey 8*» oi . Br»ad«d 
Veal 8Va OI or Fish n Chips S ot 



2-99' 



Hendries Juice Cups - 12 Count Pkg. 
Hendries Ice Cream Sandwiches - 12 Count 
Caterer's Ice Cream, Assorted Flavors 



X 89* 



01 
Pkg 



99* 



All Stop & Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience. 



STOP I SHOP in HADLEYAMHERST Route 9 at the Hadley-Amherst Line. 8:00 a.m. • 10:00 p.m.. Mon. • Sat 



Intramural notes 



League standings 



as of 7-12-74 
MEN'S SOFTBALL 

American League Won -Lost 

Education 2-0 

Oceans 2-0 

Over the Hill Gang 2-0 

DD214 2-0 

Frank's Flunkies 1-1 

Blue Wall 0-1 • 

Immorril 0-1 • 

Selohssa 0-2 

Six Hundred 0-2 

Psychology 0-2 
•< game under protest 

National League Won -Lost 

Worms 2-0 

Plumbers 2-0 

Sissies 2-0 

Dead End Kids 1-0-1 



University Store 
Pipefitters 
Bods 
Ashcan 



0-1-1 
1-1 
1-1 
0-1 



CO-REC VOLLEYBALL 

Won -Lost 



Watergate 9 


0-1 


Coins 


0-2 


Astoglia 


0-2 


CO-REC SOFTBALL 




Won-Lost 


Immorril 


2-0 


Rowdy Bunch 


1-0 


Misfits 


1-1 


Sops 


M 


Patriots 


0-1 


Liberation Front 


0-2 


F- Stops 


0-2 



2-0 

1-1 
1-1 
0-2 



The Bound 
Bound Upward 
Genesis 
Webster 

MEN'S VOLLEYBALL 

Won-Lost 
Gunners 2-0 

Painters i-i 

Genesis i-i 

African Students 0-2 



Some fish change color, 
which is controlled by 
their eyes. 



Other info 

The Summer Intramural swim 
meet will be held Tues.. July 23 at 
6:00 PM in the Boyden Pool. You 
don't have to be Donna De Varona 
or Mark Spitz to compete and have 
a good time. Entries for all events, 
including individual swimming, 
diving, and relays for nr>en and 
women, will be accepted up to the 
start of the meet. For information 

call the IM office at 5-2801. 

All individual participants in 
tennis, badminton, squash, etc. are 
reminded to play their matches 
before the time limit so the tour- 
nament will progress on schedule. 
Also, participants may play ahead 
of schedule if mutually agreeable. 



Give 

tOl 

it 

helps. 



+ 



IheAiMrkan } 
Th»Goo4 } 




denim SM^ $ ^95 ^,.^ ^j 



Sunshine 

EKercise Scmdah 




P»gej4 



THE SUMMEIl SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY !•, W4 



THURSDAY, JULY IS, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«9« ^S 



VA says vets are 98% of its reps 



Vietnam-era veterans nnake up 
almost 98 per cent of the more than 
1,300 Vet Reps selected by the 
Veterans Administration for new 
duties on college campuses, the 
agency has reported. 

The counselors, most of whom 



were recruited from outside the 
agency since the program was 
announced by President Nixon 
March 31, are presently enrolled in 
two-week training institutes at four 
centrally located college campuses 
across the nation. 



^^^W^FW^9m999 9W^^^^^9WWW^^^W '99^09^^99 



i'He cAPmm i^ie 



^ ^f7^i^^ 



sumnivr of 

(,()() I) TIMES 



» Complete Dinner Menu 

UKDNKsr) \v -SI M) \V. Featuring 

Broiled Live Lobster 3'^! 

Happy Hour Daily 4-6 p.m. 
all drinks only 49' 

Entertainment Sunday & 
Vlonday Nites 

Luncheons Daily 1,1:30-3:00 

IS DAMON KOAi). \(M^m\^n'^<^\ 

.')Ki-i;usu 






<>^^^AA^*^* •^^Adi^^a^^ifc^AAJbAA^fcAdfcAJUMh^Ail^kA 



Classifieds 



WANTED 



[FOR SALE 



I want to buy your tick or ailinK car. any ] 
make, any model, any problem, foreign orl 
domestic. Call Bob, 253-7241. for fast Mt-I 

trl 



Tboroghbred type mare, age: 12 years; 
jbelght: 15.3 hands. Rides Knglish and 
IWestem. good brood mare potential. Mt. 
I Toby Stables. S49-U77. 

tn-18 



Wanted: Male runners for MS thesis, 
physiological experimentation. Sub-i 
maximal exertions. Call S4g-I48l. 

7-111 



Fender Amp Super Reverb, four tens 175 
►atU. Very good condition. Call l-733-2g22. 

tf7-18 



i!i;:t Suruki TS-2.'>u Motorcycle, (iood 
condition, excellent dual purpose bike. 
rPKUlered. Iin.'i. (all Ken after .S p.m.. at 

:i:i-7.vi>t. 

ir7-20 



Attractive openmlnded females for| 
modeling and gogo dancing, part time, 
good pay. Write, give full details, phone. P. 
C. Box 212, Enfield. O. 

IfS-lj 

BICYCLES 



SERVICES 



Car repair hassles? Experienced 
mechanic will fix it right. No problem to 
large or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
Bob. 253-7241. 

tf8-IS 

RIDE WANTED 



Need cycling info? Repairs, rentals, 
sales of all modern bicycles. Peloton, I 
East Pleasant St., Amherst Carriage 
.Shops. 

tf8-l.5 

FREE 



Kri-f Mack und white puppies, call .'>4.*>- 
iNMNi. K\. 17. h4>lween N::HI a.m. and l::ui| 
|).m.. ftir info. 

tf7-IH| 



To I'Mass from Greenfield. Mon.-Fri. I 
nerd to be here at 8 .to and leave at 5:00. 
(all Uarlenr. 773-939<). Will pay gas. 

tf7-18 

ROOM WANTED 



FriT — l.iixely Siami«sp kittens. 4 wk old 
I iill .'>I<)-II7IJ. after .'> p.m. 

lf7-2.-. 



FOR RENT 



Would like rmtm w-kilch priv or i bdrm 
,\\t\ in riifMl area near Amherst. Prrf l.ev- 
lhidlr>. Sept. I . ( all .>l»-4>t2.'>. (mm :)-H p.m. 

tfK-M 



I'hrci' 
on Main 
(all r>:i 


Ix-driMim apt in 2INI 
.SI.. Anihrrsl. Iri.1 


yr old 
mo.. 


hou 


1 














tf7 


IM 



LOST & FOUND 



Mould appreciate return of brown 
Miilrasc removed from front of Whitmore. 
Moodax 7:INI a.m. Morrill 120. \o 

l|IICVli<HI'> 

tf7-l8 



HELP WANTED 



3RD WRLD STUDENTS 

Th)' StudrnI Organir.inK Prnjerl has 
all ofH-iiinH for a part-lime sludenl 
intern t:ui a week beginning now and 
going thru \ugusl :il. We are par 
licnlarlv seeking minority applicants 
Organising and research experience 
iMTessar>. \ppl> in Hm I2H. Sludenl 
I niiMi h\ Mondav. .luly 22. at (< p.m 

tr7-IM 



Housekeeper wanted, male or female. 
Ilexihir hours. Amherst Motel. Route 9. 
o|i|> /.a \ re's 

If7-IH 



RENTALS 



( nrimis ahoul Hrittany Manor? (all 253- 
•mii'i fill ;in\ informalion. 

117-IM 



HAIR STYLING 



RESEARCH 

Send S2(or our mail order calalngue. 
iiiiiililrlr I'lducational Research 
s«T\icc inrl. lerni paper research 
Ihisis ii'si-anh. etc ( (>I.I.F(.IATK 
MI-iSIMK IISVSTIvMS. IMtMl K Kerr\ 
\»r . Itldg. Suite 20r.. ( anipden. \.l 
iixMii Irl iinii-<Mi;!.i;777. :tii.ooti 
Hist \H( II I'M'FRSON FII.F.. Mrs 
Ml .'i 'Mil. Hi-I iSi. i|2.<t.-i per page, 7 
dax deliviTx i 

tr 



i 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long, l.et us shape and 
maintain your hair through the long 
hoi summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers h> RK and AMINO PON 
Your style center. 25:i-98(t4. 
Collegelown I nisex. IH3 No. Pleasant 
St . Amherst. Mass. 

IfH-ir. 



EXPERIENCED MANAGFR 
WANTED 

Full lime employment starting mid 
\ugusl. Retailing, buying. displa.\. 
etc Apply Kmporium India. Carriage 
Shops, \mhersl. 

If8 8 



Average age of the new Vet Reps 
is 29 and there are 28 women 
among the group. Almost all have 
bachelor (jegrees anci a significant 
number have obtained graduate 
degrees. 

More than 50 of the newly 
appointed counselors are Spanish 
surnamed veterans scheduled for 
campuses principally in Texas and 
Southern California. There are 80 
black Vet Reps in training along 
with 14 orientals and 4 Indians. 

The Vet Reps are scheduled to be 
on campuses by Aug. 1 They will 
assist in delivering advance 
educational assistance checks 
covering the first two months of the 
fall semester to veterans enrolled 
under the Gl Bill. 

At more than 1,300 colleges and 



universities the Vet Reps will 
provide on-campus service at least 
weekly. Itinerant service, once or 
twice monthly, will be offered at 
some 1,400 other colleges. 

The Vet Rep will serve as an 
expert on veterans' affairs and help 
expedite required monthly cer- 
tification procedures between the 
veteran, the school and the VA 
regional office. He also will serve as 
a consultant to school officials and 
faculty members. 

Relaxing of rules that 
automatically stopped issuance of 
monthly assistance checks when 
the school or veteran failed to 
supply stipulated information also is 
expected to eliminate many 
headaches encountered by veteran 
students in the past. 



Mew students will be enrolled for 

a two- or four-year period, 
eliminating multiple interruptions 
and continuous VA award actions 
required under the previous 
payment system. 

Training for the Vet Reps is being 
conducted through July 19 at Kean 
College, Union, N.J.; West Georgia 
College, Carrollton, Ga.; Case 
Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland; and UCLA, Los Angeles. 

Each institute is staffed by VA 
central office and regional office 
personnel. Guest speakers include 
representatives of the veterans unit 
of the Office of Education, 
Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare. Also invited to attend 
training sessions were HEW 
regional coordinators. 



MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



Great^Frontier Adventure! WALT DISNEY 



f^fiA Q1RQ MOUNTAIN FARMS MALL 
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Kinks album 'half there ' 



ByM/KEKOSTEK 
Preservation Act 2 - The Kinks 
(RCA CPL2-5040) The main 
problem with this simplistic yet 
expansive theme-sermon of 
modern day emptiness if that Ray 
Davies fails to celestialize the titanic 
struggle between the thoughtless 
money-grubbing corrupt, immoral 
opportunists (played as Flash) and 
prudish, mindless B.S. Skinner 
types (here as Mr. Black). Davies 
presents his ideas all through stock 
characterizations (Tramp, f-loozy, 
Henchmen, the two easily-defined 
leaders) so that we get absolutely 
no glimmer of life through any 
manner outside the music and lyrics 
(all penned by Raymond Douglas 
Davies). 

This turns out too great a task for 
Ray; things work fine when we can 
splash easily in moments of pure 
inspiration ("He's Evil", "Money 
Talks" "When A Solution Comes", 
"Salvation Road") in which words 
and music flow beautifully, defining 
a deep and real feeling, giving 
persuasive life and force to Davies 



ideas. There are, however, too 
many moments concocted strictly 
to fill out the album's form. These 
are not memorable, are not in- 
spired, and drag the ideas in them 
down to indifference. 

What Davies has felt for many 
years now, as a 20th Century Man, 
is total helplessness in his fate. This 
feeling is expressed several times 
on both Act One and Act Two in a 
keen and compelling voice ("And 
I'm sitting here-Watching it all go 
wrong") and is expecially 
noticeable because it is one of the 
few departures from the rather too- 
alike singing on the record 
(remember how Dave Davies 
wailed on Act One? Two needs 
more of that). 

There are two basic ways of 
Artistic Expression. One is to set 
down a situation with, at the end, a 
moral, a message, an observation 
that is the Artist's opinion — Crime 
Does Not Pay; Life Is 
Oleomargerine; Everyone Should 
Work On A Rubbish Truck Once A 
Year; I'm As Horny As A Leper. 



Play has no plot 



v»#*t»»»»- 



>**,'*>•>>> 



^ t » 4 t ^ I » 



By BRENT W/LKES 
The Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theatre concluded its first 
play of the season last Saturday 
night with the final performance of 
"Jacques Brel Is Alive And Well 
And Living In Paris." 

To this reporter, an untrained 
reviewer, the musical had 
seemingly no plot and merely in- 
troduced 23 songs written by 
Jacques Brel, a Belgian born 
troubadour composer, who has 
decided not to perform in America 
again. His songs which were 
sometimes cynical and other times 
amusing, revealed his outlook on 
life, death and all the related ex- 
periences. 

The cast was composed of two 
women, both Mt. Holyoke 



students, and two men, one of 
whom is a student at Amherst 
College. The performances of the 
cast were inspiring and very 
professional. Of special note was 
Michael Walker who was superb in 
performing "Jackie" and "Am- 
sterdam". Marcia Bresslour was 
also very good in her rendition of 
"Marieke". 

The play was p>erformed in a 
small tent (capacity 300) on the 
grounds of Mt. Holycke College. 
The orchestra was uniquely 
situated beneath the stage which 
was in the center of the tent. 

The Summer Theatre continues 
its season with "Harvey" which will 
be playing tonight through 
Saturday (see article on page ). 



Grad students needed 



As in the past, the University 
continues this summer to make 
many of the decisions which shape 
the lives and careers of students. 
The significance of this lies in the 
fact that, by absence or oversight, 
students are often excluded from 
the process. 

The student senates have, over 
the last few years, worked intensely 
at insuring due input to these 
decision situations and it is critical, 
both to the sutstantive issues and 
the process, that student 



representation continue over the 
summer. 

The Graduate Student Senate, 
therefore, urges all graduate 
students to consider their own 
relationship to the University and, if 
time permits, to take a position on 
one of the many University 
committees meeting over the 
summer. For information, call 
Barbara Stack at 5-0970, 5-2896, or 
leave name, address, and telephone 
number at the Graduate Senate 
office, 923 Campus Center. 




JON 
VOIGHT 



JULY I7th-23rcl— Eves. 9:30, Sat. & Sun. 2:00 



A.IKKOMK llKI,l.MAN..)OIIN S( HIKCIWiKH l>I»)l)r(TION 

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Also Elliott Gould in "The Long Goodbye' 



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Coming July 24th, "ALFREDO ALFREDO" 

with Dustin Hoffman 

NOW - Calvin Northampton - "KING of HEARTS" 



Manner Two of Expression consists 
of presenting a slice of the life pie, 
letting the audience chew on that 
for a while, and letting the folks 
pick out what is what about what 
(see Citizen Kane, The Bicycle 
Thief). The philosophy behind this 
is that life is too much to be 
compressed into one meaning; any 
real grappling with it is only through 
u large-scale involvement. And 
people must decide for themselves. 

The most obvious companions to 
these Kinks productions, which 
certainly follow manner one, are 
The Who's Tommy and 
Quadrophenia. These two works 
are given life and allowed to move 
on their own, with a width and 
breadth lacking in the Preser- 
vations. Tommy and Jimmy are real 
people, not stereotypes. You 
cannot build a life message on 
unreality. 

Taken on a par, with other 
normal records, and even other 
Kinks records. Act 2 does fine. But 
fit into the ambitious mold Davies 
has set for them. Act One and Act 2 
seem to be only half there. 

Stars and Stripes Forever-Tiye 
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band (United 
Artists UA-LA184-J2) time 72:59 

For years this Dirt Band kicked 
around the Rock-Pop market, 
unable to sell anything besides 
Kenny Loggins' "House At Pooh 
Corner", which they call "a song 
about your favorite characters in 
modern English literature". Figures. 
Then a couple years ago they made 
a great all-star country ex- 



travaganza, three elaborately, 
soberly packaged records called 
Wm The Circle Be Unbroken? 
which sold steadily to become a 
million dollar seller. The boys saw 
daylight. 

Now they're back, with another 
great original title, packing 
themselves in the same elaborate 
old country manner, but with one 
major difference: they left the 
country stars behind. It's just the 
Dirt Band (mostly live) with a little 
bit of Vassar Clements, and they're 
as boringly straight as ever, only 
more so. They're heading straight 
for the kids whose parents live their 
lives according to Hee Haw, and 
have never (and would never want 



to) heard of The Flying Burrito 
Brothers or Gram Parsons. 

A drianed of anything Dlt 



.\r'rHK(;.-\rK.s 
OF SMITH (•oi.i,k(;k 



II 



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lurnViu 

^ \ NORTH 



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t 
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WEDDINGS 
FUNCTIONS 

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Page u 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY It, 1*74 



Editorials 




Reviews 



Conventions 'gooning' UMies 



By ZAMIR NESTELBAUM 

"It's getting so you can t breathe 
around here. Why the students 
can't even use this place anymore!" 
sighed the haggard looking youth 
with a Guru Maharaj Ji button 
attached to the seat of his jeans. 

"What do you mean Jack?" I 
asked inquisitively. 

"Well after the Guru freaks left, I 
thought UMass would return to its 
old placid self. You know, nothing 
to worry about except tennis, 
sunsets and an occasional frat boy 
hanging from a tree with his jockey 
shorts attached to the highest limb. 
But it hasn't worked out that way!" 

"I don't understand?" 

"It seems that those clones that 
run the Campus Center have 
decided to drag every damn- 
banged convention this side of the 
San Diego Zoo into Amherst. And it 
all started with Genghis Kahn Ji 



and his flying hordes of tortilla 
skulled affectionados. Since then I 
can't walk through the Campus 
Center." 

"Why are they doing that?" 

"Oh! Probably some half-assed 
scheme to pay off the huge debt on 
the Campus Center, since the State 
defaulted on its share of the 
financing. I mean what good is it for 
the students if we keep getting 
thrown off elevators by any con- 
ventioneer with a shit-eatin' grin on 
his or her face. I mean we pay for 
it!" 

"That's a very grave matter. 
What's been going on lately?" 

"Well the first group in after the 
Guru people were the morons from 
the World Camera Clubs. Why I 
couldn't even sit for a minute by the 
Campus Pond without some 400- 
pound dolt lumbering up with an 



Instamatic and asking me to turn 
my head a little to the right. And did 
you know they were raffling off a 
device which is considered the new 
development in photography?" 

"What's that?" 

"It has to do with a tissue box 
and candle." 

"Oh!" 

"But they're not half as bad as 
some of the New England Patriot 
strikers. Why the other day I was 
hitchhiking and was picked up by 
this "dude" in a Mazerati Lum- 
baguini or some other such exotic 
mobile. He told me he was a Patriot 
and he was on his way to picket for 
higher wages. "Man he said, I 
needs me a 12 percent cost of livin' 
increase jus' to pay for de gas on 
dis thing. Man, where kin I pahk 
mah machine so's I kin tool over to 
de picket line with de rest of de 



Vietnam War aid continues 



To the Editor: 

Anyone who has been involved in trying to secure 
public funds for any kind of project knows how ar- 
bitrary the final budget allocations can be. On the 
national level we experienced the ultimate frustration 
trying to understand Defense Department standards 
and budgets in the 1960's. While peace negotiations 
and Administration double-talk cooled civilian 
pressure a hope for new domestic priorities was raised 
when the Paris Peace Agreement was signed in 
January, 1973, ending our $100 billion war in Irv 
dochina. 

Yet the confrontation of lobbyists in Washington 
this summer is reminiscent of five years ago. United 
States expenditure in Indochina was $5.3 billion in FY 
1973, $2.9 billion in 1974, and has been proposed at 
$3.7 in 1975, which would be 50 per cent of our total 
aid program overseas. Our own Defense Intelligence 
Agency estimates that the USSR and China together 
spent $290 million on North Vietnam in 1973, so 
clearly the U.S. is more than matching "enemy in- 
puts." Secretary of State Henry Kissinger wrote 
Senator Edward Kertnedy on March 25 this year that 
"while the South Vietnamese Government and people 
are demonstrating increasing self-reliance, we believe 
it is important that we continue our support as long as 
it is needed." In light of the World Bank's assessment 
of Siagon's economic needs, American taxpayers 
coukJ be subsidizing the Thieu government for the 



next three decadas. 

Less than 3 per cent of our aid to Indochina could 
really be called humanitarian. Evidently some 
legislators are aware of this as Senator Cranston of 
California testified as follows March 19 before the 
Senate Armed Services Committee: 

"We are subsidizing the systematic killing, 

torture, and imprisonment with money that 

rightfully belongs to our cities, our poor, and 

our elderly . . . there seems to be no end to our 

involvement in the grindingly brutal system of 

oppression perpetuated by President Thieu." 

Since the Peace Agreement was signed a year and a 

half ago 75,000 South Vietnamese have been killed 

and an estimated 200,000 political prisoners are being 

held. Under "reconstruction" the flow of refugees 

continues so that now over 50 per cent of the entire 

population is in resettlement camps. 

Throughout the summer the Tiger Cage Vigil and 
Fast will be working with numerous other groups in 
Washington to press the public and Congresspeople 
to turn down the Administration's unreasonable aid 
requests for Indochina. Five Amherst area residents 
spent a week in June lobbying in Washington and are 
looking for support in the second New England week 
to begin there August 4th. They will be showing a 
slide program. The Post War War, and describing the 
Tiger Cage Project at noon and 7:30 p.m. today in the 
Campus Center. 5^^/, Rockwell 



Move album a bargain 



by DAVID SOKOL 
THE BEST OF THE MOVE - THE 
MOVE <A&M 3625) Total playing 
time: 74:03 

From 1966 when they first broke 
into England's bigtime with "Night 
of Fear", until their ultimate break- 
up in 1972, the Move produced an 
amazing string of singles and 
albums which brought the group to 
considerable prominence in Native 
England. However, recogntion 
almost totally eluded them in the 
United States, a result of many 
factors, chief of which were their 
failure to successfully conduct an 
American tour, and their frequent 
label changes which resulted in 
little media push. This is still a bit 
hard to understand because their 
material, primarily the writings of 
founding genius Roy Wood were 
both as commercial and as in- 
novative as those of the more 
recognized English greats such as 
the Who and The Kinks. 

The Best of the Move is the 
second collection of major Move 
material to be issued since the 
band's demise, though unlike Split 
Ends, the two record BOTM 
features all of the group's earlier 
hits as well as their entire first 
album, previously unavailable 
except in a few choice import bins. 

Included are all the Move singles 



through the monstrous "Bron- 
tosaurus" ("Blackberry Way", "I 
Can Hear the Grass Grow", 

'Flowers in the Rain", "Fire 
Brigade" and of course "Night of 
Fear") as well as their bang-up 
versions of Moby Grape's "Hey 
Grandma" and of James Handley's 

"Zing Went the Strings of My 



Heart", here treated lovingly by 
drummer Bev "Don't Mess Me Up" 
Bevan. Though the Move have split 
and gone their separate ways, this 
was how it all started for Jeff 
Lynne, Bev Bevan, Trevor Burton, 
and rock titan Roy Wood. A 
bargain at twice the price. 



We want B lacks too 



To the Editor: 

The Student Organizing Project 
IS still seeking one student intern to 
work part-time for the remainder of 
the summer doing organizing and 
research work, at a salary of $30.00 
per week. This is one of the student 
internships mentioned in the 
"Solstice" article which appeared 
week before last. While we ap>- 
preciated your article, it was un- 
fortunate that the headline em- 
phasized that we are seeking 
women applications, without 
mentioning that we are seeking 
applications from Third World 
students also. Indeed, our search 
thus far has been particularly 
disappointing in regards to the 
latter, so we are especially en- 
couraging Third World applicants 
at this time. 



The Student Organizing Project 
is committed to having women and 
Third World peoples well 
represented on our staff, and to the 
ongoing participation of these 
groups in formulating and carrying 
out the overall goals of the SOP. To 
this end we are concerned with 
complying not only with the letter, 
but with the spirit of affirmative 
action policies, and to combatting 
racism and sexism in ourselves, and 
in the institutions which effect our 
lives. 

Since our deadline for this 
position has been extended to 
Friday, July 19, all interested 
persons should contact us im- 
mediately at room 428 Student 
Union, or by calling 545-2415. 

Nesta King 
Studeryt Organiiir^g Projact 



baseball player who while in a brawl 
on the field, advertised his brand of 
false teeth on National T.V. by 
biting an opposing player on the 
head. Corn of the Cob, Hell! was all 
that Borbon would say after they 
got him sedated. The poor guy he 
bit, he had to have a rabies shot!" 

"I can't believe these crazy 
conventions. Makes you kind of 
almost wish the next Democratic 
National Convention was " 

"No! No! No Nol NNN- 
NOOOOO!!!!! 
AAAAGGGGHHHH!!!! 

With Apologies To My Friends 



(^REATi 




workin people." 
Wow! I didn't know all this." 
"And that's not a half of what's 
coming. Next week comes probably 
the worst group all summer. Worse 
even than the Guruniks, If that's 
possible." 

"Who?" 

"The Frank Sinatra Fan Club. 
And they're coming equipped with 
their own buck and a half hookers 
and Walter Cronkite dartboards. 
We've been warned never to say 
the evil words "Australia, journalist 
or labor union" while they're here, 
or UMass could find Itself wrapped 
in cement and sitting in the bottom 
of the Connecticut River. You know 
Sinatra, he does it his way." 

"Yeah, but we'll do him our way, 
I can see it now. He can share a 
twin bill engagement at the 
Bluewall with Sweet Pie; Sinatra 
And His Skin. " 

And right after the Sinatra 
maniacs come the wierdest bunch. 
The Pedro Borbon Denture 
Convention. Pedro Borbon is the 



A case against M 

By E. Patrick M. 

You might, one fine day, while strolling across "the campus"' bump Into 
one Edward M. You will not recognize him, for he has no true identity. He 
Is himself, a stranger; to the world, invisible. 

There is a certain desire in M. to deny himself of his rightful place in this 
world. He is tempted to surrender his identify to the powerful technological 
forces that he manipulates yet of which he has no control. 

Estranged and alienated in the social order of things, this individual 
becomes more and more powerless to defend or even to examine his 
personal desires and aspirations. He may accept his position as an outlaw 
and the pronounced sentence of "guilty" by his onlookers. 

The moral taboos laid down by society, and the acceptance of them are 
an insult to the intellegence of the human race. Supposedly man is far 
advanced above his ancestoral counterparts In nature. The only difference 
seems to be that man has the potential to be superior. Apes and angels — 
and somewhere in between, a struggling mankind. We have created laws 
against the individual and "crimes without victims." Certain drugs are 
illegal; several sexual acts, deviations from the norm, are forbidden; suicide 
is punishable by death in some countries. 

What is to be done? Where is M. to run? 

A free person does not flee from the society to a retreat far from con- 
crete buildings and plastic people. Rather, he overcomes himself and his 
situation. He is like Sisyphus, pushing his eternal rock nowhere and smiling 
at absurdity. 

The student too, we must imagine smiling. Forever climbing orchard hill 
onlv to return to the world of Whitmore on each descent there exists a dual 
temptation for submission and revolt. 

People constantly speak of freedom, yet the mere presence of truly free 
person, a free spirit scares them. It scares the hell out of them. We are 
weighed down either by the daily routine existence of stagnant 
bureaucracies or dominated by the blind dictates of our contemptlous 
institutions. The individual is despised and cast into a hellish life of exile. 

And vet he condemns himselft by failing to question the reason and 
meaning behind the great spectacle of his life. What hope is there for the 
man, for M. or X when the world and universe become a vast nothingness. 



WH><. . ./>iR. fijCiVWAW. . . ITS MOT THE 
.SCHOLARSHIP ^ SHOJLD BE WoRRl£t> ABOUT ! 
IWIWK OF THE. femiy Of BEIN6 A M»M(/TEH«W'; AWQ, 
■mc VARitTX i-£TTERS... WOT Tb KENT^Qij THE 
'•EAetSV aCSlDES, BASKET- WEAVIINJ6 AlA^JOAf 
ME A REA«_ scA/^rY N0iVAt3AYS.. 



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Toma- an unbelievable cop 



By MIKE KNEELAND 

"The mob thinks I'm crazy!" says 
super-cop Dave Toma who spoke 
here yesterday. 

Toma, who has the 10th ranked 
television show based on his ex- 
periences as a Newark police of- 
ficer, has devoted himself to 
breaking the mob. 

His record Is unbelievable: over 
9,000 arrests with a 96 percent 
conviction record — and he has 
r)ever fired his gun. 

Toma was once stabbed by an 
assaulter who said, as Dave lay In 
his blood, "I'm going to kill youl" 
He thrust forward with his knife and 
still, Toma could not bring himself 
to fire the gun. 

"I felt the damage was already 
done," he said. Thinking he was 
dead for sure (which he almost 
was), Toma recalls. "What good 
would it have done if I blew his 
head off?" 

The Newark detective is best 
known for the disguises he uses to 
Infiltrate gangs. "If you don't look 
directly at people," he said, "you 
can fool almost anyone." Toma has 
become so proficient at this trade, 
he has even fooled his best friends. 

In the trunk of his car he carries a 
suitcase of disguises. He is thus 



able to change Into whatever 
disguise fits the occasion. "When 
I'm in a Catholic area I'm not going 
to dress up as a priest. I'd be too 
obvious." 

Instead, Toma likes to play the 
role of drunks, addicts and pimps. 
A highly sensitive, compassionate 
person, he notes, "It's a great 
feeling sitting In the gutter with 
kids.. .not trying to find out where 
they got the drugs. I've reversed 
the role.. I've looked from the gutter 
up at policeman." 

Toma jokingly relates how many 
people stop and say, "Hey, you 
can't fool me, I saw you dressed up 
as a lady selling pretzels the other 
day." Toma usually says yes, but to 
keep the information quiet. In fact 
Toma disguised himself as no such 
person. 

Threats are commonplace to 
Toma. His car has been blown up 
upon Ignition, arxJ sonr>e of his 
detective friends wait a safe 
distance until Toma starts up his 
car. 

Another person telephoned nnany 
threats to Toma before one of his 
frequent public appearances. So he 
turned the tables around. "I know 
who you are," he said. "I had your 



mother last night and you"re afraid 
I'm going to be related to you." 

For all the fanfare and publicity, 
Toma remains a humble person 
who can see through the "bullshit" 
Citing problems he has had with 
publishers ar)d network executives 
over what he writes and how he is 
portrayed, he says, "'I could be a 
millionaire today, but I'm not going 
to do what they want me to do." 

Toma is against marijuana but 
does not believe stiff sentences are 
the answer. He says he has seen 
many people "freak out" on 
marijuana because its potency may 
vary or be treated with another 
drug. 

At an Informal Bluewall 
gathering, Toma told the group he 
has 7,000 letters yet to answer — 
and he will do them personalty 
because each letter Is different. 

He recognizes that many people 
look to him for down-to-earth 
psychology and inspiration. 

He four>d that In his late mother. 
But now he says, his Inspiration 
comes from a 30 year okl woman 
who has been on her back all her 
life with only the use of one hand. 




Dave Toma Pholo by Steve Ruggles 



The Summer 



vol. 1 Mo. 4 




recyclable 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1974 



■•<f^^ 



Grad attacks bursar's office 



By MARK VOGLER 

A UMass graduate has asked a state 
legislator to investigate the University's 
disbursement of state Board of Higher 
Education funds. 

Brian Allard, 21, of North Adams wrote a 
letter this week to Sen. John H. Fitzpatrick 
(R-Stockbridge), questioning the conduct of 
the UMass Bursar's office in Its handling of 
the scholarship awards. 

Although Allard was promosed $300 from 
the board last August, he has not yet been 
reimbursed for money he personally paid the 
University when the funds were said to be 
unavailable. 

"What really bothers me Is the fact that a 
large number of funds coukj have been 
tampered with by certain people In the 



Bursar's office at the students' expense," 

Allard said. 

"And there also seems to be an in- 
consistency in what people there say and 
what the bursar himself explains is hap- 
pening. 

"'I find It Interesting that throughout the 
year I was informed that the money had not 
come In. This Is in direct contrast to a letter I 
received from the bursar which said that half 
of the money had been available since 
January." 

Bursar Robert R. MIshol called Allard's 
request for an investigation "a little ex- 
treme," but added his office woukl 
cooperate fully if one were conducted. 

"We would in fact welcome It, there's no 



problem with our office. Our records are 
open to any student at any time," Mishbl 
said. 

"The problem isn't In our office. There 
seems to be a delay In Boston which Is 
getting worse each year, t can't understarxi 
why it takes as long as five months for those 
furKis to come in." 

MIshol said the board's office appears to 
be greatly understaffed. Although a check of 
approximately $300,000 was promised 
UMass recipients of the scholarship last 
semester, the University was forced to loan 
out $15 to $20,000 to those students who 
needed the money, he added. 

"'Many schools throughout the state are 



quite disturbed about the situation," M'ishol 
said. 

"Money has always been delayed during 
my 10 years as bursar. And I think K needs 
desperate attention." 

He said Allard's personal situation was "a 
misunderstanding." According to MIshol, 
Allard could have received credit for the 
scholarship by deducting the awarded 
amount from each semester's bill. 

"However, by paying the total bHI, the 
University couldn't reimburse him if the 
funds weren't there," he said. 

Richard Savinin, President of the Student 
Government Association, said Tuesday he 
had not known of any dIfficuKies but plans to 
discuss the situation with MIshol. 



Prof gets big awards 



Professor Chinua Achebe, 
Nigerian novelist and man of 
letters, presently on the faculty 
here is the recipient of two of 
the most prestigious in- 
ternational literary honors in the 
western world. 

The Scottish Arts Council, in 
a letter from Lord Balfour of 
Burliegh, announced that 
Professor Achebe is the second 
recipient of the annual Nell 
Gunn International Fellowshp. 
This fellowship was founded in 
1972 as a national tribute to 
international achievement. Its 
object Is to invite the world's 
most distinguished writers to 
visit Scotland, there to honor 
them in such ways as are ap- 
propriate. The first holder of the 
fellowship was Heinrich Boll, the 
distinguished German novelist 
and Nobel Prize winner for 
literature. The fellowship, which 
has a value of 1000 pounds, was 
established in honor of the late 
Neil Gunn, jone of Scotland's 
greatest coritemporary authors. 

In a simultaneous develop- 
ment The Modern Language 



Association of America has 
voted to elect Professor Achebe 
to an honorary fellowship in the 
association. A spokesmn for the 
association said that the "roll of 
international honorary fellows Is 
limited to forty persons 
representing the highest level of 
achievement in world 
literature." It includes such men 
and women of letters as Simone 
de Beauvoir, Samuel Beckett, 
Heinrich Boll, Jorge Luis Borges 
and Rene Char. 

Professor Achebe, who holds 
appointments In both the 
English Department and the 
W.E.B. DuBois Department of 
Afro-American Studies, Is the 
leading novelist of modern 
Africa. His works have been 
translated into twenty languages 
and are regarded as classic in 
the emerging tradition of African 
literature. Professor Achebe Is 
regarded as a leading candidate 
for the Novel Prize literature. A 
retiring man, the professor had 
no comment on his two latest 
honors. 



Celebration for Cuba upcoming 



DR. JOHNNETTA COLE 
BLACK NEW SERVICE 

In recent years, progressive 
people and organizations 
throughout the United States have 
joined In the celebrations which 
take place all over the world com- 
memorating July 26, 1953 -■ a 
significant date in Cuba's history. 
This celebration recalls the attack 
on Mocanda Garrison, the main 
fortress of Batista's gov't. Although 
a military failure, the attack sparked 
the movement which led to the 
defeat of Batista's dictatorship on 
January 1, 1959. The Cuban people 
won the power necessary to 
embark on a full-scale tran- 
formation of their society, 
responding for the first time In 
Cuba's history to the urgent needs 
of the common people. 

The major organization In the 
U.S. working on the July 26th 
activities Is the Venceremos 
Brigade. The Venceremos Brigade, 
a national educational project since 
1969 has provided North America 
with information on Cuba primarily 



by sending groups to Cuba to work 
and share cultural activities. To 
break the information blackade, a 
major part of the Brigade's work Is 
devoted to conducting educational 
programs to large groups 
throughout the year. One such 
celebration is the one on July 26th. 
This July 26th progressive people 
around the world join Cuba in 
expressing support for the 
Chileans' fight to regain their 
democratic and human rights and 
to rescue the future of their country 
from the military regime. Programs 
have been organized In 13 U.S. 
cities around the theme of CUBA- 
CHILE: TWO FACES OF LATIN 
AMERICA. Major events are 
planned for New York City and 
Chicago. For the two major events, 
Isabel and Beatrice Allende, 
daughters of the martyred 
president of Chile, Salvador 
Allende, have accepted an in- 
vitation to appear and are now 
seeking visas from the U.S. State 



Department. The Invitation has 
been endorsed by a number of 
Congress people: Michael 
Harrington of Massachusetts, Bella 
Abzug of New York, and Ron 
Dellums of California. 

The 26th of July Committee of 
Western Massachssetts (a coalition 
of groups and Individuals) have 
planned a three day series of event^ 
to be held In the Black Culture 
Center of Springfield College, fret 
to the public. ^ As the enclosef* 
program Indicates, activities wi 
include films, slides, speakers, an 
discussions on both Cuba an( 
Chile. Highlighting this will be tht 
photographic exhibit, "EXPO 
CUBA" - the largest mos 
comprehensive exhibition o 
contemporary Cuba ever asserr 
bled in this country. First shown i 
New York City, last July 26th, th 
exhibit of photos and text explain 
the social and political condition. 

Continued on P. 3 



THURSDAY, JU1.Y 25, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 3 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1»74 



Page 2 



Wounded Knee Comm. needs $$$$ 



The Wounded Knee Legal Defense 
Committee says it needs more money to 
maintain its services. 

In its July newsletter, the Committee said 
it is costing them between $1,000 and $1,500 
a day to operate. "... with the opening of the 
Lincoln, Nebraska office our Sioux Falls work 
force was cut in half and our operating 
expenses soared. We have been maintaining 
for some time a jury selection staff in Pierre, 
an investigations crew on the Pine Ridge 
Reservation, and two full legal offices in 
Sioux Falls and St. PauL" 

The organization also said there is a 



continual demand for bond money which 
can't be met. They said as of June 21, they 
had only $45 in the bank and had ac- 
cumulated $10,000 in unpaid bills. 

"While the prosecution is given unlimited 
access to your tax dollars," they said, "we 
must wade through one financial crisis after 
another." The group added that the "new 
blackout" has made it "doubly hard to 
mobilize public support." 

The Committee has also charged Judge 
Joseph Bottom with unfairly treating 
Wounded Knee defendants in his courtroom. 
They quote Lutheran Bishop Archie L. 




Mattson saying he was told by the judge that 
"ihese aren't ordinary Indians. These are the 
toughs. They wanted this and we gave them 
what they wanted." 

The reference was made, they say, after 
Judge Bottum ordered spectators "to stand 
for the flag or leave." The judge was 
presiding over a case whose defendants' 
charges stemmed from "injury to the 
courthouse" the committee said. 

The defendants told the court, "We 
cannot in good conscience participate in the 
judicial process which is based on South 
Dakota's dual system of justice toward 
Indians and their white supporters ... South 



Dakota Attorney General Kermit Sande and 
Judge Joseph Bottum, both up for re- 
election, can use the recent convictions of 
three Custer defendants in their campaigns." 

The newsletter also contained the 
declaration made by the First International 
Indian Treaty Council. 

"We reject all executive orders, legislative 
acts and judicial decisions related to Native 
Nations since 1871, when the United States 
unilaterally suspended treaty making 
relations with Native Nations ... All treaties 
between Native Nations and the United 
States made prior to 1871 shall be recognized 
without further need of interpretation." 



Robert Doolan 



Photq by Jim Paulin 



College educators 
stress mutual aid 

Three Umass administration officials participated recently in a con- 
ference of leading educators which called for state aid to private colleges 
and a continuar>ce of low tuition at public colleges. 

President Robert Wood, Chancellor Carlo L. Golino (Boston) and Vice 
Chancellor Robert L. Gluckstem represented UMass at the Williamstown 
conference. Presidents of 24 public and private colleges pledged their 
willingness to work together on problems facing both private and public 
colleges. 

Among key points made in the docuownt were: 

— The voters should apprnvn th« rnnKtitutional amendment, twice 
passed by the legislature and now before the public, to allow state aid for 
private collates and universities. 

— Low tuition should continue for publicly sponsored colleges and 
universities. 

— publicly and privately sponsored colleges and universities should 
initiate in concert a statewide program of planning for the sound 
development arxl most effective utilization of all higher educational 
resources of the Commonwealth. 

— Through open planning, disclosure of institutional data, and 
enrollment projections, the public can expect colleges and universities to 
avoid unjustifiable duplication in educational programs and capital outlay. 

The conference was supported by a grant from the Ford Foundation. 
Portions of the meeting were chaired by John Adam Jr. who said in a 
memorandum to Trustees and presidents," ...important gains were made 
both in urxierstanding and agreement on things which can be ac- 
complished through cooperation between the public and private sectors 
based on a combination of enlightened self-interest and good faith." 



THE SUMMER 




EDITORS 
Michael D. Kneeland Rudolph F. Jones 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 



Steve Ruggles 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole Signed editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoonS; and letters represent the personal views of the rUJthors 

OFFICE: 422 S.U. 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 

p.m. 



UMass applicants down 



By Mike Kneeland 

The National Association of 
College Admissions Counselors 
recently reported there are 500,000 
openings for freshman and transfer 
students in colleges and universities 
across the country. 

While many schools are being 
forced into high key recruitment 
campaigns, the University here is 
having no such problems. 

"We can live comfortable even if 
the number of applications drops a 
little," said Robert Doolan, UMass 
director of admissions. 

Doolan explained that UMass 

was getting about 21 ,000 applicants 
four years ago. About 16,000 
students applied for the freshman 
class this year. 

The University has encouraged 
this drop by discouraging ap- 
plications from out- of- staters. Their 
applications dropped from 6,000 to 
2,ci00 over the past few years. 

"We sent discouraging letters to 
the out-of-state applicants telling 
them the situation here.. .that know 
matter how good they were, we 
couldn't guarantee them an ad- 
mission," said Doolan. 

There are openings this fall for 
3600 freshman. Doolan said there is 
still a fair amount of competition for 
those positions. "We have not felt 
the crunch." 

In an article titled "The Student 
Shortage", Time Magazine recently 
noted there were still places for 
25,000 freshman in New England. 

They said the 1970s have brought 
the close of the post WW II baby- 
boom, and that college is no longer 
being used as a draft haven. They 
also noted the increase in 
popularity of vocational schools. 

There is, of course, less a money 
factor here than at private colleges 
whose tuitions average about 
$3,504. 

Doolan, who has been working in 
admissions for 12 years including 



the past five years as the director, 
says "kids are looking at college 
differently... The money situation is 
tighter." 

Doolan is not only concerned 
with having the right number of 
applicants, but also a good 
distribution of applicants. He would 
like to see the freshman class 500 
per cent male and 50 per cent 
female. For the Fall semester, the 
director said, there were 2,000 less 
female applicants than male ap- 
plicants. 

He says he will not accept, 
generally, a less qualified woman 
simply because she is a woman. 
Last year's freshman class was 47 
per cent female. 

There are five people who 
process freshman applicants. Each 
application, Doolan said, is 
reviewed at least once and usually 
twice. 

He said a number of criteria are 
used to evaluate an applicant. "If 
an applicant is in the upper third of 
his class, and has college boards in 
the upper 400s, he or she has a shot 
at admissions." 

He said last year's average verbal 
score for entering freshman was 
530 while, the math score averaged 
576. These figures, he said, do not 
vary greatly from year to year. 

The admission officials also 
consider what major the applicant 
has selected. "We're not par- 
ticularly concerned," Doolan said, 
"with a physical education ap- 
plicant's math scores as much as a 
physic applicant's math score." 

Doolan himself usually handles 
the applicant for the engineering 
department. He has tenure from 
that school and knows "where you 
can loosen up" with an applicants 
record. 

Doolan says he has no qualms 
with the University's liberal ad- 
mission's policies for veterans, who 
comprise 10 per cent of the un- 



dergraduate student body. 

"If veterans have a basic 
competance in verbal and math...- 
we say 'whatever your background 
is we'll forget it."' 

Doolam also drew attention to 
the low flunk-out rate here. He said. 
14 per cent of the freshman flunked 
out of the University 12 years ago 
while only 1 per cent of the entire 
school flunked- out last year. 

He said the average cum is about 
3.1 now compared to 2.1 about 12 
years ago. 



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Read a tarrot card today 



By E. Patrick McQuaid 
Perhaps you've been wondering 
about your latest midterm, or where 
your next romance will stem from. 
Well, you might want to consult 
Zacharia on the Campus Center 
Concourse. No, he isn't a CASIAC 
counsellor, he reads Tarrot cards. 
Zacharia 20 years old, will be a 
senior this fall here and is majoring 
BDIC in Astrology. He began his 
studies as a freshamn in the field of 
Hermanic sciences (Mythology, 
Alchemy, Astrology). Two years 
ago a friend gave him some lessons 
in Tarrot reading and his interest 
brought further concentration. 

Zacharia resides in Shrewsbury 
but has recently taken an apart- 
ment here in Amherst. "I started 
doing readings this summer," he 
said "because I wanted to live in 



Amherst. The cards are what feed 
me. 

Business is going well for him so 
far. On his finest day he grossed in 
nineteen dollars and on his worst, 
five. His clients consist of students, 
convention visitors, and campus 
staff workers. "Typical college 
people," says Zacharia. 

Where Tarrot readings originated 
is hard to say. According to most 
scholars they begain in the mid 
Dark Ages by the followers of 
Hermes, an alchemist-magician 
during the time of Christ. 

"I see the cards actually as a 
picture of the world," he saki 
"because the cards are just like the 
world they respond the same way 
the world would to you. Similarities 
have significance. 

"The world and everything is 



Local station cites 



effects of grass 




Radio Station WHYN recently 
•-.ompleted a set of editorials 
concerning the ill effects of 
marijuana. 

James A. Kontoleon, the 
Springfield station's vice president 
and general marwger, said many 
listeners took exception to the 
editorials so it released its sources 
which included testimony by 
doctors and research scientists. 

They quote Dr. Henry Brill, 
regional director of the New York 
State Department of Mental Illness, 



saying new data has come to light 
concerning mental deterioration, 
acute psychotic attacks, and 
psychotic reactions from the use of 
even small amounts of marijuana. 
The physician was also quoted by 
WHYN as saying reactions in the 
heart and circulatory system are 
suspected,and there are indk:ations 
of an adverse reation in the body's 
anti-infenction chemistry. 

The station says Dr. Cecile 
Leuchtenberger, from the Swiss 
Institute for experimental carKsr 



Other side of Latin America 



Continued from P.l 

that caused the war against the 
Batista dictatorship, and the 
people's final victory. The exhibrt 
also vividly portrays the major 
themes in Cuba today: the 
agricultural reform; the search for 
indigenous culture; sports; hearth 
care & housing; mass organizations 
and popular democracy; how 
Cuban politics works; and Cuban 
solidarity with Chile and other 



peoples of the world. The exhibit 
brings to Western Massachusetts a 
rare opportunity to understand the 
complex history and present 
society of a neighboring country. 
All events are open to the public 
and free of charge. For further 
information contact: The 26th of 
July Committee — Western Mass., 
67 Northampton Avenue, 
Springfield, Mass. 01109. 



composed of the same substance," 
he continued. "The same stuff 
structured the same way is the 
same thing." 

Zacharia hasn't received any 
interference as of yet from anyone. 
At present he doesn't expect any. 
"I read the cards every morning and 
they say the same old thing. No 
trouble yet." 

Tarrot reading is a serious 
business for Zacharia and most of 
his customers take it in the same 
vane. Next semester he will be 
writing the astrology column for the 
Collegian and will receive three 
credits. 

The cards that Zacharia works 
with now have that aura of exotic 
Persian bizzares but, he says, "I 
bought them in Denholm's of 
Worcestor." 



research, believes marijuana 
disturbs genetic equilibrium and 
that it may interfere with the normal 
formation of sperm. 

Their third editorial quotes Dr. 
William Paton, a pharmacology 
professor at England's Oxford 
University, saying before the 
Senate Subcommittee on Internal 
Affairs concerning marijuana, 
"marijuana can prolong and make 
powerful the effects of barbituates 
which means a non - lethal dose of 
barbituates could become lethal." 

The professor also testified that 
marijuana could cause abnormal 
heartbeats which could lead to a 
heart attack; and that grass causes 
a dilation of peripheral blood 
vessels, which could cause the 
blood supply to the brain to fail. 

The editorial series saying, "Two 
dozen international experts gave 
testimony about the effects of 
smoking marijuana, all of the 
testimony was against marijuana. 

"We have not commented on the 
penalties involved in possession or 
sale of marijuana. ..WHYN does not 
feel that marijuana should be made 
legal." 

Store hours 

The store hours for the Textbook 
Annex will be 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 
p.m. Monday-Friday 



lM*i 




In medieval France, werewolves could be re-humanized 
by being struck between the eyes with a key, if anyone 
could get close enough to do it. ^_^ 




Because of its feathers' 
softness, the owl's flight 
is slow and noisele.ss.which 
is more important to the 
owl than speed. 




Zachoria 



Photo by Jim Paulin 



Expo Cuba schedule 



7:00 p.m. — Opening 
reception. Major address: "United 
States Government arid the 
Coming of Fascism to Chile." 

8:(X) p.m. — Cuban FHms. 
SATURDAY* JULY 27 

1.00 p.m. — Doors open for 
Continuous viewing of Cuban 
Films. 

2:45 p.m. — Slides and 
discussion on Chile: Robert Stein, 
City Planner, Stanford, Conn. 

4:(X) p.m. — Cuban Films. 

8:00 p.m. — Cuban Films. 
SUNDAY* JULY 28 



1:(X)' p.m. — Doors open for 
continuous viewing. 

2:00 p.m. — Address and 
discussion on Cuba. 

4:(X) p.m. — The Brigade Ex- 
perience in Cuba: Slides ar>d 
discussion by members of the 7th 
Contingent of the Venceremos 
Brigade. 

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE 

AND OPEN 

TO THE PUB UC 

Historia De Una Batalla 40 minutes 

Isle of Youth 1 5 minutes 

Por Primera Vez 10 minutes 



XBtOK BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of- 
fering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two— sided 
copies* (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Va cent extra per sheet. Gnom6n is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copying onto one side only, add % cent per copy. 




THURSDAY, JULY 2$, 1*74 



Pa«e 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pats in Super Bowl shape 



BY MIKE KNEELAND 
If the players' strike never ends, 
then the New England Patriots aie a 
good bet for this year's Super 
Bowl. 

While other teams around the 
league are training with relatively 
few rookies and free agents, Coach 
Chuck Fairbanks is putting about 60 
such players through double- 
session work— outs each day. And 
many of these players are showing 
good promise coaches say. ^ 
Most of the credit goes to 
Fairbanks himself. During the off- 
season he worked hard signing the 
players he now has in camp. And 
he inked them before the WFL. 

One of the more promising 
players in camp is Steve Schubert, 
a former UMass wide receiver, 



Schubert played with the New 
England Colonial in the Atlantic 
Coast League last season and 
earned all— star honors. 

Coach Fairbanks compares the 
5'10" star to Randy Vataha in speed 
and o-.itude. Some fans are saying 
Schubert has little chance of 
making the squad since the Patroits 
already have good, veteran 
receivers. But Coach Fairbanks 
recently squashed that attitude. He 
told reporters he'd never release a 
good prospect; positions couW be 
shuffled, or trades made, with the 
end result being a better Patriots 
team. 

Another local player with good 
prospects is punter Rich Pelletier. A 
former Holy Cross Star, Pelletier is 
some kind of athlete. 



Hamel resigns 



Paul Hanr>el has submitted his 
resignation as treasurer of the 
Student Senate. 

Jack Margosian, chairperson of 
the Student Senate Financial 
Affairs Committee, has been ap- 




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pointed the treasurer in an acting 
capacity until a formal election is 
held in the early Fall. 

Hamel has served as the 
treasurer since April of '73. 
Desc.ibing his job as a "cop in the 
system," he said the treasurer is 
basically responsible for the proper 
use of all Student Activities Tax 
Fund (SATF) which totals about 
$992,000. 

A senior Food Science and 
Nutrition major with a 3.5 cum, 
Hamel says he is particulariy 
pleased with his role in the ex- 
pansion of the ture note series 
(from 30 to 70 courses) and the 

implementation of a computer 

system in the Recognized Student 

Organization (RSO). 

Hamel says he resigned his 

position because it was getting 

"harder and harder ... to keep 

producing." 
"I felt I was becoming less 

proficient on the job," he said. 
Hamel has accepted a position as 

a special assistant to the director of 

alumni relations. 



As a hockey player he was the 
second leading national scorer. Like 
Schubert, Pelletier also played for 
the Colonial last season. 

Pelletier was cut from the 
Patriots because he was "line- 
driving the ball," Fairbanks said. 
But this time around, Fairbanks 
says he's been hanging the ball 

well. 

Another good prospect in camps 
quaterback Neil Graff, 6'3" and 205 
pounds. Graff starred a the 
University of Wisconsin and played 
against Fairbanks' Oklahoma team. 
In '72 he was on the Vikings' taxi 
squad. And that's where he could 
be once the strike ends. All the 
same, Fairbanks would like to have 
a good quaterback being groomed. 
With the goal posts moved back 
to the end of the endzone, a 
fieldgoal kicker is a great asset. In 
that department the Patriots have 
another good prospect. Yes, John 
Smith also played for the Colonials 
last season, he was 19 for 21 , hit 36 
consecutive conversions and once 
kicked a 48- yarder. 

Smith, an Englishman has been 
working out since Jan. and Fair- 
banks says he has seldom seen a 
player dedicate himself so much to 
making a team. Come Sept., 
number one will probably be 
number one. 
There are a few Patriot's veterans 
camp, including their out 




Bowl-bound? 



Photo by Steve Ruggles 



UMass prof receives grant 



m — ^. 

standing guard John Hannah. 
Fairbanks says Hannah has been 
experimenting wi*' various 
techniques in camp. 

Defensive end ray Hamilton 
, >orted to camp Tuesday citing 
personal reasons for breaking the 
strike. He joined another veteran 
defensive end already in camp, 
Nate Dorsey. 

^,ke race 




The 1974 Summer Intramural 
Bike Race will be held Tuesday, 
July 30, at the north end of the 
Stadium Road at 7 p.m. The race 
will be approximately 1.7 miles and 
AO f\f\f\ '^ °P®" ^° ^^® entire University 
K63rnS Q6tS $3,000 community. Entries are being 
^ accepted now and will be accepted 

up to the start of the race. For more 
information call the IM Office it 5- 
2801. 

All individual participants in 
tennis, badminton, squash, etc. are 
reminded to play their matches 
before the time limit so that the 
tournaments will progress on 
schedule. Also, participants may 
play ahead of schedi'le if mutually 
agreeable. 



Jerry Kear^s, an instructor in 

the UMass art dept., has been 

awarded $3,000 by the National 

Endowment for the Arts which he 

/ill use to fund the publication of 

three soft- cover books. 

"The Hampshire Gazette", to be 
released in Sept., will be the 
analysis of the culture represented 
by the Hampshire Gazette news- 
paper which is published in North- 
ampton. 



Jeffrey William Pferd, teaching 
associate in the Department of 
Geology at UMass, received a grant 
from the Geological Society of 
America (GSA) and Sigma Xi to 
support his doctoral research work 
in western Massachusetts. 

"The Nature of the Vermont-type 
Domes: Density Driven Structures 
or Interfering Structural Trends" is 
the title of Mr. Pferd's dissertation. 
In addition to geologically mapping 
the Colrain quadrangle, he is using 
automated techniques for handling 
the collected field data. This is the 
second year that Mr. Pferd has 
received grants from GSA arKJ 
Sigma Xi. 

WMUA'i 

WMUA will present its weekly 
public affairs program FOCUS, 
Monday, July 29, at 10 p.m. 

This week on FOCUS, Walter 
Jonas and Eric Walgren will talk 
with John Fisher and Nesta King of 
the Student Organizing Project of 
the UMass Student Senate. The 
topic of the radio show will be, 
"Are Students People?" The free 
form format of the show will allow 
interested listeners to telephone in 
their own views on that question. 



A native of New Jersey, Mr. 
Pferd is an alumna of Park School 
in Indianapolis and a 1968 graduate 
of Johns Hopkins University. Two 
years later he earned a masters' 
degree in geology from the 
University of Georgia, where he 
studied engineering properties of 
salt-marsh sediments. Mr. Pferd 
attended Lehigh University before 
entering the University of 'Massa- 
chusetts, where he is working with 
Dr. Leo M. Hall, a New England 
structural geologist. 

Mr. Pferd and his wife, Martha, 
are presently living in Amherst. His 
parents are Mr. and Mrs. William 
Pferd of Mendham, New Jersey. 



Off The Hook is a program 
which expands the potential of 
radio beyoi.J the limits of one-way 
communication. Open forums are 
held an average of once per week, 
on other nights knowledgeable 
guests from a variety of fields are 
invited on the program to take 
questions and respond to listener 
comments. Off The Hook is heard 
Monday through Thursday, 
following the six o'clock news. 




Summer Clearance 

SALE 



Women's Sandals 
$5 - $7 - $10 

Men's Shoes & Sandals 
$5 & $10 



(while they last) 



$H€E* 

N. Pleasant St., Amherst 



THURSDAY, JULY 2S, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Paft S 



Free blues concert here this week 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
On Tuesday, July 30, a blues 
concert will be presented on 
Metawampe Lawn, behind the 
Student Union. The concert will 
feature renowned blues artist Bo 
Diddley. While many performers 
have become known for their song 
writing, or distinctive phrasing, few 
are known as originators of new 
rhythmic patterns. Such an 
originator is Bo Diddley. 

Bo established his reputation as 
one of the leading blues artists in 
the 50' s, along with such greatSj.as 
Chuck Berry and Little Richard. The 
"Bo Diddley Beat" has such an 
indentifiable sound that it's known 
to Black artists as the "tradesman's 
knock." The beat has been stolen 
by many — the Rolling Stones, 
Duane Eddy, Johnny Otis — but 
none have been able to totally 
capture that unique pounding 
rhythmn that is truly Oiddley's own. 

As a guitarist, he can only be 
described as outstanding. His 




music remains as contemporary as 
today, and should delight blues, 
soul, and rock fans alike. Appearing 
with Bo will be the Rhythmn 
Jesters and Little Feat. The concert 



will be held at 7 p.m. In Case of rain, 
it will be moved to the Student 
Union Ballroom, and summer 
Student I.D. holders will be ad- 
mitted first. 



The Indentiviable Bo Diddley 



Emily Dickinson to be discussed 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
Emily Dickinson will be the 
topic of discussion in this week's 
Bicentennial Discussion Hour. Mrs. 
Polly Longsworth, who has done 
extensive research in the life and 
times of Emily Dickinson, will be the 
guest speaker. 

Many people who have lived in 
Amherst for a number of years — 
especially those who live in the 
University community — are 
unaware of Miss Dickinson as a 
tremendous figure. 

The gravesite and family estate 
of the Dickinsons are still very 
much intact in Amherst, with the 
house itself located on Main Street. 
The informal hour will be held 
on Wednesday, July 25, in the 
Student Union Colonial Lounge this 
afternoon. 

Dr. Dan Jordan, of the Center of 
Human Potential, will have a Music 
Hour on Wednesday, July 31, in the 
Campus Center Concourse. Dr. 
Jordan, a classical guitarist, will 
combine both music and 
philosophy of life during his per- 
formance. The music hour will be 
held between 12 noon and 1 p.m. 

The Student Union Art Gallery is 
presenting its third exhibition of the 
season. It consists of drawings, 
prints, and paintings by Scott Prior. 
Prior received his Bachelor of Fine 
Arts degree from UMass in 1970. 
His work consists primarily of in- 
terior scenes, though his award- 



winning "Nimrod's Engineers" 
includes details of hardhat 
engineers, buildings, and land- 
scape. The spirit of his work has 
been described as "a unique 
synthesis of contemporary New 
England and the late Gothic-early 



Renaissance period in the 
Netherlands. 

The exhibit may be viewed from 
July 21 to August 4. Gallery hours 
are Monday through Friday from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m., and 6 p.m. to 10 
p.m. 



Hair coming to UMass 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
Hair is coming to UMasslll 
This 1967 Broadway hit will be 
presented in Bowker Auditorium 
July 31 through August 3. The 
play's original theme, an inside view 
of contemporary youth, has been 
held intact, while changes have 
been made to keep its social and 
political satire in tune with current 
world issues. 

The tribal rock-musical will be 
performed by the Connecticut 
Music Theatre Company. The CMT 
is an educational company 
sponsored by the State of Con- 
necticut through Greater Hartford 
Community College. The company 
works under the direction of 
professionals, one being producer- 
director Jack Tierney. Tierney, an 
alumnus of UMass, received his 
B.A. in Music Education and a 
Masters in Performance. He 
considers the overriding spirit of the 
company to be "a commitment to 
the essence of professionalism." 



The company itself is said to 
represent some of the finest 
college-age talent on the East 
coast. 

Showtime for all four per- 
formances is 8 p.m. Tickets — 
$2.00 for students, $3.00 for all 
others — are available in the 
Student Activities Office (in the 
Student Union) and at the box 
office before each performance. All 
seats are reserved. 




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• inHrtMhmiHf Taadip - SMttf^Mp For dance and sing along Good Times 



THE GABLES OLDE TAVERNE 



665-4643 



Follow Rte. 116 from Amherst to Rtes. 5 and 10 in South Deer- 
field, North 2 miles on right. — 



Page A 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1974 



THURSDAY, JULY 25. 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 7 



Frame up to be shown 



A first showing of the film, 
"FRAME-UP, THE IM- 

PRISONMENT OF MARTIN 
SOSTRE" by the Pacific Street 
Film Collective will be shown at the 
University of Massacusetts 
Monday. July 29, in Thompson 104 
at 7:30 P.M. and Tuesday in the 
Campus Center Auditorium at 7:30 
P.M. This film provides 
documentary testimony to judicial 
injustice and defines a political 
prisoner. The political prisoner in 
this case, Martin Sostre, has been 
incarcerated since 1967. At that 
time, because Martin Sostre was 
offering to people in his com- 
munity, known as the Cold Springs 
ghetto in Buffalo, New York, an 
alternative to drugs or acceptances 
of degraded living by offering 
books, ideas, a place to study, a 
place to discuss and a place of 
refuge, his bookstore became a 
target for police harassment and 
surveilance. Eventually Buffalo 
police engaged a jailed heroin 
addict to stage a heroin sale by 
walking in and walking out of 
Martin Sostre's bookstore, with 
heroin in his pocket. 

Since the arrest, trial and im- 
prisonment of Martin Sostre 
stemming from this frame-up, the 
same man who as a result of his 
complicity in taking heroin into the 
bookstore, was released from jail 
and had a larceny charge dropped. 
Four years later this man recanted 
his original testimony in a signed 
affadavit. In addition to this, an 
officer of the Buffalo narcotics 




[Open Daily 9:30 A.M.-SP.M.J 

F^tticoaLSkirt with 

mirnons , 
I in ootton. 

Halters, 

ssorted. 




I 



^y^r -vo THE POST" ] 

OFFICE. IN AKHERST-J 



squad, who also testified in the trial 
of Martin Sostre saying that he had 
witnessed from across the street 
the sale of heroin in the bookstore, 
has since been dismissed from the 
Buffalo Police Department. A re- 
enactment of this testimony is in 
the film and proves the impossibility 
that anyone could witness such as 
occurence. This former police has 
been indicated because of the 
"disappearance" of $100,000 worth 
of heroin from the Buffalo Police 
Department's narcotics toc ker. 

Despite this perjured testimony 
from two of the trial witnesses, 
Martin Sostre remains in prison. 
Throughout this imprisonment he 
has demonstrated his motivation to 
seek and to offer an alternative to 
submission, conditioning and 
brutality. He has trained himself in 
law to pursue his own case which 
he believes will contribute to his 
release. He also has filed many 
suits, some of which have won for 
prisoners a few of the very minimal 
human rights. He is currently at- 
tempting to win a suit which vyould 
end rectal searches, which is a 
prerequisite before visitations in 
New York State prisons. Martin 
Sostre has rfused to submit to this 
practice, thus he has been tortured 
by being placed in solitary con- 




finement for 14 months and has 
been beaten and gassed. He also is 
waiting a decision on an appeal 
which seeks continuance of federal 
protection (i.e. to remain in the 
Federal Detention Headquarters to 
prevent transfer back to Clinton 
Prison in upstate New York where 
beatings and solitary confinement 
are inevitable) while testifying 
against state officials specifically 
regarding beatings infliceted on him 



and another former prisoner. 

Amnesty International, a 
prestigious world-wide organization 
for the defense of political 
prisoners, which has consuhing 
status with the United Nations and 
is a member of UNESCO, is backing 
Martin Sostre's plea for justtee. A 
spokesperson for Amnesty In- 
ternational recently stated, "We 
have become convinced that 
Martin Sostre has been a victim of 
miscarriage of justice because of 
his political beliefs." 

For those who see this film, 
"FRAME-UP, THE IM- 

PRISONMENT OF MARTIN 
SOSTRE", it will become apparent 
that the mind and energy of Martin 
Sostre is in no way confined and 
that at the age of 51 he is tireless in 
his determination to conduct a life 
of dignity even within the un- 
justifiable confinement of prison. 
Among the outcomes of this film, 
will be the impossibility for one to 
overlook that justice travels in any 
direction other than toward the 
rich, and for one to say, "We dWn't 
know." 



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Soft Absorbent White or Assorted Colors 

Solid White Tuna 

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P"C« f "iCI'v* IK'u July 7' '»" 



Upward Bound at the University 



By GLORIA MONTGOMERY 

Black News Service 
Highly efficient and energetic are 
characteristics well suited to the 
personality of Don Brown, director 
of the Upward Bound Program of 
Western Massachusetts for five 
years. Upward Bound is a pre 
college preparatory program for 
disadvantaged high school youth. 
Originated in 1966 as part of 
Lyndon B. John . s war on 
poverty, the Upward Bound 
program concentrates on fostering 
confidence, assertiveness, and a 
better sense of academic direction 
to students who are involved with 
the program. 

The administrative staff of the 
Upward Bound Program are fullv 
aware that among the students 
with which it deals certain 
hostilities preva'! with regard to the 
way in which the public school 
system functions. Generally, the 
public school system is viewed as a 
system of administration which fail 
to give priority to the normative 
value of human beings. Because far 
too much emphasis has been 
placed on educational programs 

which operate only structurally 
Upward bound endeavors to make 
education the free and ever ex- 
panding process which it should be. 
The Upward Bound program 
operates out of the university on a 
year round basis. During the 
summer the student participants 
become part of the university 
community for from six to eight 
weeks. The camp, located in Cance 
House is the current location of the 
Upward Bound program. Students 
have come from 14 communities in 
Western Massachusetts. The 
various counties from which they 
come include Franklin, Hampden, 
Hampshire, and Berkshire. The 
population in attendance 
represents both sexes and includes 
students from Black, White and 
Puerto Rican descent. One half of 
the target population come from 
urban areas and the other half are 
from rural areas in Western 
Massachusetts. 

During the summer camp, the 
Upward Bound students attend 
classes each day on a rotating 
schedule. The summer program 
gives special impressiveness to the 
disciplines of Math, Science and 
English. There is also a Reading and 
Study Skills Program in operation 
which was compelled to be ex- 
panded out of dire concern for the 
low reading scores acquired by 
students. The Bilingual component, 
which has also been in operation 
for some time, has proven to be an 



invaluable communication tool in 
both relating to the Spanish 
speaking students which it recruits, 
and in allowing these persons a 
chance for better communication 
behavior in their daily lives. The 
recruitment policy was altered this 
year in an effort to recruit more 
persons of Puerto Rican descent. 
In addition to the regular course 
offerings of the Upward Bound 
program, this year it has adopted a 
Career Development component. 
The objective of Career 
Development is to give students 
insight into prospective fields of 
interest. The sentiments reflected in 
the youth is one of strong en- 
thusiasm with regard to this new 
component, which offers them 
assistance and experience in 
preparing resumes and guest 
speakers who speak to the job 
outlook for the seventies. 

In addition to being involved with 
the students, the Upward Bound 
administrative staff places much 
emphasis on the need for elevation 
in education to their parents as 
well. Many of the parents who 
never received a high school 
diploma have entered some 
program of education where they 
receiving their General Equivalency 
Diplomas and respective high 
school diplomas. In an effort to 
encourage the success of them- 
selves and their children, many of 
the parents have entered in- 
stitutions of higher education and 
are in attendance either at the 
university or some technical 
community college. The Upward 
Bound administrative staff have in 
the past few years been most 
successful in heiping its par- 
ticipants get accepted to colleges 
and for those students who must 
go out to work immediately after 
high school graduati. ., locate 
suitable jobs for them. 

"Realizing that all can not be 
accomplished in six weeks the focal 
point of our program is what 
happens when the kids go home" 
commented Brown. He spoke to 



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the effect that the academic year \n 
the most critical segment of the 
progranri where the students must 
confront both environmental 
obstacles and institutional ones as 
well. Brown feels that he is for- 
tunate to have personnel who are 
both skilled and concerned with the 
well being of the students. 

■^he program is designed to meet 
.ne needs of new students stalling 
in grade 10, 11th graders who are 
returning seniors in the fall, and 
students who return as high school 
graduates. These students are able 
to earn college credit for work on 
the college level which is offered for 
their acceleration in college. In 
keeping with the objective of the 
program. Upward Bound has a 
tutorial program which functions in 
the evenings. Students are ex- 
pected to attend tutorial and an 
absence from a tutorial session has 
the same negative consequence as 
from da:, s attendance. No student 
is allowed to miss more than three 
classes without a satisfactory 
excuse. 

It is the general feeling of 
Director Don Brown that the 
current summer camp is. "The 
healthiest program to date". 

The laws which authorize Federal 
and STate funds to help educate 
people living in disadvantaged 
communities are not always in the 
best interest of the people that 
these programs are to function for. 
Too often when these programs go 
into effect they become in- 
stitutionalized and have little 
positive effect in offering an> kind 
of educational reform. Such is not 
the case with the Upward Bound 
Program. Clearly Upward Bound 
recognizes its obligation to the 
communities which it serves. At no 
time does it forget to give priority to 
the objectives of the program. 
Perhaps if there were the same kind 
of sentiment functioning in other 
educational programs in our 
communities, concrete educational 
reform can become a reality. Such 
a program can and will exist only 



through cooperative efforts in making it so. 




Don Brown Photo by Rudolph Jones 



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ra««t 



THE SUMMBK SOLSTICC 



TMtfUSOAV, JULY U, 1974 



TNUflSOAV, JULY 2S, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Preservation Hall Jazz Band 




Photos by 
Steve Ruggles 

Appearing last Thursday 
night, the Preservation HaU 
Jazz Band (PHJB) 
delighted well over a 
thousand spectators with an 
evening of fine New Orleans 
jazz. 

The band, composed of 
six musicians from New 
Orleans (most in their 70's), 
played many of the old jazz 
favorites which has made 
New Orleans famous. 
Displaying a genuine style 
rarely found in the East 
Coast, PHJB blended brass, 
clarinet, drums and piano 
into some superb music. 

The musicians en- 
couraged the audience to 
participate and by the end 
of the evening, the crowd 
was really into the music, 
clapping and singing along 
with the band. For the 
finale, the dand played 
"When the Saints Go 
Marching In". During the 
finale several members of 
the band left the stage and 
strolled around the crowd 
playing while hundreds of 
people danced and sang 
behind them. 

The Preservation Hall 
Jazz Band brought here a 
style of music not native to 
the area but which is 
thoroughly enjoyed and 
greatly appreciated. 

Brent WUkes 










WMUA sets new program schedule 



1 7 - n 

1 . . A«MI« 


SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


• ^" ^"^ ^^ ^MB «^ ^am m 

TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


a ^im^^ ^M <B^ ^^ ^im w^^ ^i*- 

SATURDAY | 


Religious Music 


Crazy 


Capt. 


Stu 


Ragtime 


Larkey 


Ragtime | 




With Charles Mann 


Nancy 


Equinox 


MacDonald 


Duck 


Mays 


Duck 1 


111-3 
1 P.M. 


CLASSICS 
Bob Charette 


Larkey 


Rocket 


Jack 


Rocket 


Duke Of 


Kansas | 






Mays 


Rick 


Harper 


Rick 


Doughnaughts 


Rambler | 


1 3 - 7 


John 














1 P.M. 


Greely 


Jack 


Duke Of 


Charles 


Capt. 


Craiy 


Fran | 


1 7 - 11 
1 P.M. 


Jubilation Jaiz Pt. 1 


Harper 


Doughnuts 


Mann 


Equinox 


Nancy 


Dance | 


Jack Harper 


Stu 


Mark 


Your Sacred 


Stu 


Stu 


Charles | 




Jubilation Jazz Pt. 2 


Mac Dona Id 


Sameth 


Cowboy 


AAacDonald 


MacDonald 


Mann | 


1 11 • 3 


Dick Moulding 














1 A.M. 




Rocket 


Larkey 


Marc 


Barry 


Your Sacred 


Dale 1 




. — ^^ ^ .,. ^ i„ 1, 1 


Rick 


Mays 


Berman 


Williams 

^WB» ^^ «■»«■• fl^B a^ ^^ ■ 


CowtMy 


_ __K 1 




Workshop: 



Death and dying 



The Division of Continuing 
Education is sponsoring three 
weekend workshops on death and 
dying on July 27 and 28, Aug. 3 and 
4, and Aug. 10 and 11- 

The workshops are designed to 
be particularly relevant to nurses, 
doctors, teachers, hospital and 
nursing home administrators, 
members of the clergy and others. 

"Understanding the Aged and 
the Aging Process" (July 27-28) will 
cover historic and current attitudes 
and practices in respect to aging, 
the aged and dying and their in- 
terrelations. 

The major areas to be covered in 
"The Terminally III and Their 
Families" (Aug. 3-4) Include: fear of 
death; Intimations; predictions; 
anxieties; awareness and ac- 
ceptance; levels of denial; coping 
strategies; hope, courage and 
despair; death and sense of time; 
dignified dying and appropriate 
death. 

The workshop, "Laboratory 
Experience in Death Awareness," 
(Aug. 10-11) will be a direct con- 
frontation with the principle that 
death is taboo. It will attempt to 
dispel many of the myths and social 
fears about death and establish a 



climate of trust whereby death can 
be treated as a subject worthy of 
serious study and reflection. 

More Information can be ob- 
tained by writing or calling the 
Division of Continuing Education, 
University of Massachusetts, 315 
Hills North, Amherst, Mass. 01002, 
(413) 545-3440. 



■YHAfj HALF A 




SOLSTICE 
CLASSIFIEDS 



PAY 



Metric seminar 



Systematic procedures for 
transition to the n>etric system will 
be the main focus of a University of 
Massachusetts seminar Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, July 31 and 
Aug. 1, at the UMass Campus 
Center. 

"Understanding, Planning and 
Implementing Metric Transition," Is 
the first seminar by the UMass 
Division of Continuing Education's 
new Northeast Metric Resource 
Center. The New England Regional 
Metric Association Is co-sponsor. 

Topics will Include legislation, 
technical and product standards, 
industrial metric transition, metric 
decisions in marketing and product 
design, employee training 
programs, and many others. 

Speakers will include the 
nationally-known metric consultant 
Robert C. Sellers, UMass metric 
specialists, Boston Department of 
Commerce District Director Richard 
F. Treadway, and others. Each 
participant will receive a full set of 
metric training, planning and 
reference books. 

Registrations will be accepted 
until the opening day of the con- 
ference. Full information is available 
from the Northeast Metric 
Resource Center, 317 Hills North, 
UMass Amherst, 01002, telephone 
(413) 545-3440. 



jpfSpr** 



Steak &^ Brew Presents 



I tl ikarylf rtaiig Mfti 

vt tefv MM • omD bertraf* •ktff* 
•ItitptrytnM 

Itr iMr.lilM tr laigria* 
wlttttuwr. 
Mbmt iMtaiM an tkt salU yei mi sake. 

A locket of Sbrinp 

;r. ;ii. i: t :::<: i. :i.:i( ,ir::«i:ii: Sl.SS 

laktd Staffed Clis: 1.3S 

French Ooion Soap 

Cr:]::i:ip^i.::.:i:i IrilSiusClMM .9S 




loDcless Sirloio Steak. NY. Cot 

Ifloeless Sirloio Steak. NT. Cot - Large 

looe In SirloiQ Steak Beav; Cot . 

Sliced SirloiD Steak 

leaf Irocbette vitb Kice 

lilf Spring Cbicken. Broiled or Terijaki 

Steakborger oo a Seeded loo 

Cktesaborger 

loan rrine libs of lief 

Filit Migooo 

iroilid Bilf Skruv 
Filit Milan ail \ 

Ullll 



my-off 

IN S^ ^3.95 

(imdESSSIIlOWIirCNI) IEIIIAIIT |4.il 



(IMdESS SlllOW NT CNI) 



T[J[. Roast Prime *4.25 
Ribs of Beef ""i*"""!! 



iiiti 



ImCnni. 



THURS 



M.95 



KSIIAIITSSIS 



L»»$l 



iBkid Piuu, 
Fnacb Frill 
Cera la tki 
Saitni Ml 

IciCnii .. 

Mi( If CiffM 



I "THE FEAST ' 

f- S::r:.::':'t:f::i:: i 

\i \ :C::it: i-:.t::-::- 

[i; D.-ii:l.';f Lt::- 
i Hj:i;:::!; ;■ 



Wie Feast'"*S.9S 

SomrlhinK lECHlARlT $1.15 

Fur Every Ta$lp — 
Filel Mignon, V-i Chicken, Broiled Shrimp, Shnre it — 
Only $1.95 Extra! 

Plus, of course, oil the salad you can make. 

SteahE-Brew 

Tke Greatest Eating A Drinking Public Houte f 

SOUTH RADLET 

489 Oranby Road 
(413) 536-3100 

• ^ 



^^> '1. tmt,J^,l.4 




When Julius Caeser was 
captured by pirates on the 
Mediterranean, he was told 
he must >;ive them 20 tal- 
ents for ransom. He laugh- 
in^'ly .said: "What, only 20 
talent.s? I will give you fSQ 
talents for mv life!" 



MYSTERY PHOTO 

We hope you have an easier time 

identifying this week's Solstice 

Mystery Phoio. 

Ittooka graduate student to identify 

last week's stumper, dancer 

Rudolph Nureyev. 

As usual, the first person to identify 

the mystery person to the Solstice 

editors in room 422 of the Student 

Union gets treated to a Blue WaH 

beer (peanuts not included). 



%/kfiJK * •» *,M^^j»^v.^^^%^AV. , 



» * * a 




0««n 14 



Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1»74 



Campbell's 
Chicken Noodle 




^9Lr 10% oz. CANS 

•ovP I CHICKEN NOODLE 
SOUP 



Personal Size 
Ivory Soap 



39 



31/2 OZ. BARS 
FOUR BAR PACK 




Bounty 
Paper Towels 



39 




120 COUNT 
2 PLY ROLL 



I 



_..d Stamps can Stretch food 
Inidgits for many families! 

In the latest Consumerisms", our weekly newspaper, were talking Food 
Stamps. Food Stamps that will increase your food buying power, stretch 
your food budget, give you better food. Food Stamps you buy that are worth 
more in food than what you pay for them. Sure, you have to qualify. But 
there are lots of you who do qualify and don't know it. 

Do you earn low wages? Work part time? Have high medical or house- 
hold expenses? Receive social security or public assistance? Say "yes" 
to any of these and you may qualify. Be sure to pick up your free "Con- 
sumerisms" at any Stop & Shop for more details on the nationwide Food 
Stamp Program, and where to apply. STOP& SHOP WANTS TO BE YOUR 
FOOD STAMP STORE. 




Star-Kist 
Solid White Tuna 




7 oz. CAN 
PACKED IN WATER 



Stop & Shop 
Canned Soda 




10 



12 oz. FLIP TOP CAN 
ASSORTED FLAVORS 



Ragu Spaghetti 
Sauce 







15V2 oz.JAR 
FOUR VARIETIES 



,«ree!tj 

§ }^!I^ "'■"'S COUPON ^, 
^ AND A $5 PURCHASE Z^\ 

i stop & Shop S\ 

I Aluminum mi 
^ Foil il 

^ 12 X 25 ROLL g| 

':Z fiood Mon . July22 thru Sat , July 27^: I 
^" Limit one roll per cjstomer r^ . I 



lt«inl olttrM fo' stit nol avtiKbl* m cat* >ol> 
o' 10 oin«< 'ei«ii dealers of wtioitaaien 



g iMiwnM m ii i w H i I 

Glad Trash Bags M" 

20 COUNT PACKAGE 

Storage Bags stop > shop 69' 

75 COUNT PACKAGE 

Instant Orange Drink -69' 

STOP t SHOP 

Smucker's Grape Jelly;? 89' 




Great Beeft Stop & Shop Beef! 



After the government inspectors inspect our beef for us, our own inspectors inspect 
it for you . . because the beef we buy must meet our ow,i rigid specifications for 
quality! In fact, from the moment we buy it, til the moment you buy it, we're able 
to do more than anyone has ever done to protect the quality of our beef. This is why 
we built our own meat plant, and developed a world of improved techniques of re- 
frigeration and sanitation There, our beef is jet-cleaned, cut and trimmed into sec- 
tions that are vacuum sealed and aged slowly, naturally, for tenderness and flavor 
So when our beef is fresh cut in your Stop & Shop, we know it will be great beef. 



Xra»wcnfrmiFiiiBiyt| ^^Quality-Protected'' Beef Naturally Aged For Tenderness ! 

Snow Crop Orange Juice 




100% 
Jj Orange Juice 
/ from Florida 



12 o; 
Can 



49' 



O 10 oz 



Pkjs 



89* 
55« 



Fairtane Cauliflower 

Cut Broccoli - Newton Acres ^°B.°g 

Swanson Dinners chopped sirloin io oz »j; 59« 

MEAT LOAf lOV. OJ OR SALISBURY STEAK IIVi oz 

STOP & SHOP '*j°' 69* 



Beef or Chicken Pie 




S Cheese Pizza 




Rib Steak 



Just heal 
and serve 



16 o; 
Pkg 



69' 



BONE IN 

Carefully trimmed 

steak, wrapped in our 

grillwork trays so you see 

both sides before you buy it. 



BONE -IN 



Pepperidge Farm Corn Muff ins '^°' 49* 
Pepperidge Farm blueberry -urf ins 9'^°' 59« 

$119 

79* 



Rhodes Bread Dough -5 Pack ll\ 
Oronoque Pie Shells 
Hendrie's Ice Cream Bar 
Hendrie's Eclair Bar 



iSoz 
Ptig 

^2 COUNT 1409 

27 01 PKG • 

12 COUNT $409 

27 oz PKG • 



Haddock or Flounder Fillets 



TASTE OSEA 
Just baKe or fry then add 
tartar sauce and lemon 



16 oz 
Pkg 



99< 



Taste O'Sea Flounder Dinner 'p;,' 

3oz 

Pkg 

2loz 
Pkgs 



Taste O'Sea Sole Dinner 
Stop & Shop Fish Sticks 



49* 

49* 
89* 



Chuck Steak- Blade Cut 
Boneless Chuck Steak 
California Chuck Steak 
Chuck Cube Steak 
Delmonico Steak-Boneless Rib Eye 
Boneless Blade Steak 
Beef Kabobs-Chuck 




BONE -IN 
Quality-Protected' Beet 



■Quality-Protected ■ Beef 



■Quality-Protected " Beef 



$109 



1 



"Quality-Protected^ Beef 



ff 4 99 



Sun Glory Butter 

69' 



Our own delicious^ White Gem-U.S. Grade ''A 

Chicken Breasts 




1 POUND- 
SOLID 

Mini-priced" 

to save you money. 

21b 



white 
gem 



99* 

Asst.Havors3'c°p',89* 

Kraft Sliced Muenster '•°;;:;°p;i,r Pk" 79* 



Chef's Delight Cheese Spread ^ 
Columbo Yogurt 



WHOLE OR SPLIT 

When you buy U.S. Grade 
"A", White Gem chickens, 
you buy the sweetest tast- 
ing chicken that money 
can buy. 



lb. 



PUisbury 



Buttermilk Biscuits 2^°; 



25* 



American Cheese 

STOP 4 SHOP ,o; 

YELLOW OR WHITE p»« 

For grilled cf>««M or ch««Mburgers 



White Gem Chicken Wings 
White Gem Chicken Thighs 
White Gem Chicken Legs 



us GRADE ■A- 1 



US GRADE A • 



US GRADE A" 



69! 



Butter English Muffins 




Slot 1 Snop 



♦'4.1'"?!" U 



SI 



Cracked Wheat Bread stop » ^ ;v.l 
Swedish Rye Bread stop t shop ;«^; 
Kitchen Cupboard Denuts '1°^' V,' 
Newfangled Muffins c^°:,&^.. '^r 

Daisy Wliite Bread 



One luscious thing on top of another 

^^ Fresh ^^^ ^ 

Catitalauiies 



.-itr--^.: 



REGULAR 

OR THIN 

SLICED 



It 01 I 

lotvtt 



CkMolate Eclair Pie '^»ii>w ';^' 69* 
MdtrMarMe Ring Cake "^S^^^^r 99* 
Stop iSkop Fudge Cake 'i^ 69* 






V 



Summer-time 

goodness at a 

sweet price. 

A cherry 

luscious 

dessert. 



ea. 



'fti^ 



'*'np a half cantaloupe with Stop & Shop 100' i 
!\atural Ice Cream for a luaciouH dennert 



S$S 100% Natural Ice Cream 



ASST FLAVORS 
QUART CARTON 



89 




starts Monday. July 22 - Saturday, July 27 

% ittni-PrHwd 8iw sertiwMin 

' S$: Cold Cuts 




eOLOGNA. P&P. 
POLISH STYLE, 
OR OLIVE LOAF 



2 69' 



STOP t SHOP SI ss 



2 LB PKG 

STOP i SHOP OCc 

I IB PKG. •»»' 

1 Lb QQC 

Pkg Oa 

STOP t SHOP OOC 

I LB PKG " 



2 lb. Picnic Pac Franks 
Hot Dogs or Mild Franks 
Stop & Shop Beef Franks 
Get-A-Long-Doggie Franks 

Imported Sliced Ham '°« 99' 

A deli selection for everyone 

Bologna or Liverwurst b'vThe pifa m 79* 
Brown & Serve Sausage fhozen ^"^Vkg'"' 79* 

•riiinmicid MHUi spfciM I 



Carando Luncheon Loaf 




Old fashioned quality 

in a beautiful 
Stop & Shop Dell-Hut 



Large Bologna 



ARMOUR 
ST»R 



85! 



Armour Old Fashioned Loaf » 79* 

Aged Provolone Cheese by the pike ^*^** 



trMM-Plleai' ITMI iM* IMCMlIt 

,l$SFresti9"Pizza 



Why send out? With 
delicious pizza like this' 



Z"*! 



'*« 39« 

"" 89* 



Gelatines -Assorted Flavors n, 

Pizza Submarine Sandwich \^, 

2 lb. Potato Salad ^.k* home mad* j^, 

AVAILABLE IN STORES FEATURING A SERVICE DELI. DEPT 

Cole Slaw or Macaroni Salad 

10 



These salads are made in our 
kitchen with quality ingredients 



49! 



Greek Rice Pudding som..hmg d,it.r.nt sj-sg* 
Meat Loaf ,^79* 

Turkey Breast ^^ ""vir'ar lu^T'"" 1 89« 



RiitheH to Stop & Shop from Idaho! 

VteshWLaixAaw 

Adelicasy' Delicious trout 
to broil, bake or fry 



1 



lb 



7 lb f^g SI 39 



S$t Fish & Chips '£>;?! '1 



Listerine Mouthwash 

A lo\l mini-price" on "'• RO^ 
a great national brand. >ti llg 

Right Guard Reodorant 

Stock the bathroom cabinet ^|« CO^ 

{ with this mini-priced'bonus can. Cmi ■Mjj 



All Stop & Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience, 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1974 



♦¥¥¥**¥*¥********* 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page ?i 



For the week of July 27 through 
August 2 

Magnetic forces alter the patem 
of celestial activity to a minor but 
definitely measurable degree over 
the next six days. Consequences of 
changes In the heavenly scene are 
easily recognized by any who 
would attempt this week to 
maintain the status quo, for such 
attempts are bound to end in failure 

— even when, initially, they seem 
quite promising. The wise man or 
woman seeking to progress over 
the coming week will make every 
effort to swim with the tide, for only 
by adapting to circumstances as 
they arise and adjusting to cir- 
cumstances as they develop will 
one be able to take advantage of an 
emerging favorable climate for 
gain. 

There are any number of op- 
portunities for the Inventive In- 
dividual to grasp over the first part 
of the coming week. Even so, 
failures are destined for the 
moment to outnumber successes, 
and even the most original of 
persons is apt to encounter ot)- 
stacles too large or too complex to 
hurdle without considerable in- 
vestigation and preparation. 
Handling chronic conditions is also 
vital to the defeat of enemies — 
known and unknown — this week; 
know your physical conditioni 

LEO (July 23 - Aug. 7) - You 
can view the coming week with 
enthusiasm — if you also are 
determined to be unafraid of 
temporary setbacks and a little 
adverse criticism. (Aug. 8 - Aug. 22) 

- Take care that a minor argument 
with a loved one does not develop 
into a serious major quarrel. Know 
the limits of another's tolerance. 

V/RGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 7) - 
Test any new ideas for practicality. 
It may be that another's suggestion 
for a new approach to an old 
problem is not feasible. (Sept. 8 - 

Hispanic Queen 

The Hispanic residents of the 
County will celebrate the 
coronation of the Third Hispanic 
Queen of Hampshire County; a 
spokesman from the Hispanic 
Center in Northampton announced. 

The coronation will be held on 
July 27, at 8:00 p.m., in the V.F.W. 
Club of Meadow St., Florence. 

There will also be a dance with 
live entertainment with 'Los 
Boricuitas' and the 'Conjunto 
Tipico Universal', Hispanic 
American bands from the local 
community. 



STCAI\ 
CUT' # 

Summer 

Entertainment 

Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
& Sat. 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY, MONDAY A 

TUESDAY 

Includes Salad Bar $A9S 

STCAI\ 
OUT" # • 

Corner University Drive and 
Route 9 



Your weekly stars 



*^*^^^^^«^^*^«^#««^^ 



Sept. 22) — Although you may not 
actually need another's material 
support, you would be wise to 
accept it if it is offered. Be thankful 
for a change of heart. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 7): - You 
could spoil a very special 
relationship with another simply by 
refusing to believe in a good thing 
when you possess it. (Oct. 8 - Oct. 
22) - Plan to take only con- 
servative action this week. There is 
much to be gained by the Libra who 
refuses to be carried away by the 
will of the majority. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 7) - 
Younger family members tend to 
become somewhat troublesome 
early in the week. Do what you can 
to lessen tensions on all sides. 
(Nov. 8 - Nov. 21) — the discovery 
of a new source of energy makes it 
possible for you to double your 
output even as you appear to halve 
your input. Stick to the point 

SAGITTARIUS (HoM. 22 - Dec. 7) 

- Make every effort to fit the part 
you have decided to play this week. 
Don't underestimate the ability of 
those who play with you.. (Dec. 8 - 
Dec. 21 ) ~ Take care that your self- 
indulgence does not cause you to 
lose out on an exciting adventure. 
You may have to ration your good 
times at evening. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 5) 

— Take no risk with present 



success. You could change the 
entire flavor of the week by rushing 
things or trying to force issues. 
(Jan. 6 - Jan. 19) - You should 
have a clear road ahead where 
career goals are concerned. Only 
take care that you don't attempt to 
achieve new ends in old ways. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 3) - 
Be on your guard against those 
who cannot refrain from repeating 
to others what you tell them in 
confidence. Keep secrets to 
yourself. (Feb. 4 - Feb. 18) - There 
are those who would not hesitate to 
spoil your chances of success in the 
near future. Be sure you know 
exactly who your friends are. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 5) - 
Add a new dimension to the image 
you project on the world. Don't be 
afraid to reveal aspects of yourself 
that indicate tender spots. (March 6 
- March 20) - You would do well 
to lay the groundwork for some 
future activities. Don't begin to 
soon, however, to put plans into 
action. Bide your time. 

ARIES (March 21 - April 4) - 
You could easily overdo a good 
thing this week. If visiting a friend, 
be sure to time your arrival and 
departure to suit another's mood. 
(April 5 - AprH 19) - Be sure you 
look the part before you attempt to 
play it — whatever it may be. There 



are friends you can depend upon; 
seek them out early. 

TAURUS (April 20 - May 5) - 
Release of tensions brings you a 
feeling of new life. Take care that 
you don't overstep the limits of 
good taste in your newfound zeal. 
(May 6 - May 20) - Take the 
optimistic view of your immediate 
future. Don't allow another to talk 
you out of present enthusiasms, 
though prospects may dim. 
GEMINI (May 21 - June 6) - 



Take care not to become embroiled 
in another's problems. There is 
plenty of time for coming to the 
rescue — a little later onl 

CANCER (June 21 - July 7) - If 
you expect another to best you in 
the present situation on the home 
front, he or she very likely will do 
just thati Lift your own spiritsi (July 
8 - July 22) - Problems which 
seemed to have no solutions 
presently begin to yeild to the 
logical, sensible approach. Hard 
knots begin to untie. 



: ^ 



SUMMER IN ^ 
AMHERST? 

BiBbiSaiHMi: 

5^ Belchertown Rd.. 

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 
4p.m. -6 p.m. 
35c Beer — SOc Mixed Drinks 
Entertainment Thurs.-Sat. 
DINNERS SERVED 
Mon.-Thurs. 
Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 




Amherst 



5:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 
5:30p.m.-ll:00p.m. 
5:00p.m. -11:00p.m. 
4:00p.m. -10:00p.m. 



yp««««ap^«««««*«a««««»aM«aB»««B»««ot^af««»f 




We 9 
HADLEY 

opp lA^Donald's 

Mon Fri 10- 9 
SxA io-fe 




fieyere 

^ssorTe^ 
•fbp men 

reg. $sr ^Q- 

A Smil© 

e|astic-waisf 
mus)in 





QffeFinfl 

hooded, 
■ferry dot)) 




>^X 



pe^. ^14. 



BAC fMsTCficHAR,6£ 



muslin wesfera 

req. $iO. 

)fids Snort- Sleeve 
T-SHIRTS 



MMM 





-.'.'.<^ •.". 



»"* I » ♦.»./.^,9A5i\tv''jk'*i#"«'4**V« « ■• , vfcAtfc *.».>.«'. ■«'..•»'•>. ..,v'ic.«*».* •<IT^T^n^N^^n»^^TTTTr!*T?r^^^^^ 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1»74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pave 13 



Pag* 12 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 2$, 1974 



Special Savinp on an 





Featuring: Annie's Song 

Thank God I'm a Country Boy • Eclfpse 

Back Home Again • Sweet Surrender 



CPL1-0548 



These 
2 albums 
specially priced 



LP 



TAPE 



Reg. $6.98 

NOW M" 

Reg. $7.98 

NOW 5599 



JOHN 
VENVERS 



BREATESTHnS 




Includes: Jake Me Home, Country Roads 

Lea^ing.on a Jet Plane • Follow Me 
Rocky A^puntain High • Goodbye Again 



CPL1-0374 



nc/i 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH 

JOHN DENVER 




Includes: Rocky Mountain High 
Mother Nature's Son • Goodbye Again 



LSP-4731 




ncii 



VICTOR 




LSP-4207 



RC/I 



fieRie 

John Denver 



VICTOR 




LSP-4607 



John Denver 

FarewM AndrQmeda 




APL1-0101 



LP - REG. '5" NOW *3" 



TAPES REG.'6»N0W'4" 



discounif 
records 6 



257 Triangle St. 



;-.ii...i.i 



Our 0zport sail 

AMHERST 549 4433 help JOT find loacttywl^ 

...welre The Hosie BMple! 



Pre Inventory 



Stereo 



Panasonic 
Close 



Clearance outei 



SALE 



SHOP 
EARLY 
QUANTITIES .,, . 
ARE ^-^^* 

LIMITED 



AMFM STEREO RADIOS 

Reg. $79.95 RE 7173 AMFM Stereo Radio with speakers 

Reg. $129.95 RE 7680 - Deluxe AMFM Stereo Radio with speakers 

Reg. $99.95 RE 7453 - 16 Watt AMFM Stereo Radio with speakers 

HOME ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS 

Reg. $129.95 SE 2000 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with speakers 

Reg. $299.95 SE 4070 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with 8 track recorder & 2 speakers 

Reg. $299.95 SE 4040 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with speakers 

Reg. $159.95 SE 5010 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with speakers 

Reg. $179.95 SE 5020 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with walnut speakers 

Reg. $209.95 SE 5040 - Delux AM-FM Stereo Phonograph with walnut speakers 

Reg. $179.95 SE 5020 - AMFM Stereo Phonograph with walnut speakers 



NOW 

$62.00 
$99.95 
$76.00 



$99.95 
$249.95 
$249.95 
$109.95 
$149.95 
$159.95 
$149.95 



AMFM PORTABLE RADIOS 

Reg. $19.95 RF 513 - AMFM Pocket-sized portable $17.00 
Reg. $29.95 RF 563 - Portable AMFM Radio $24.00 



Reg. $39.95 RF 593 
Reg. $99.95 RF 7120 



- Portable AMFM Radio $32.00 

- Deluxe Portable AMFM Radio $79.95 



AM RADIOS 

Reg. $14.95 R-47 
Reg. $lz.88 R-72 



AM Battery Opperated Cube Radio $11.00 Reg. $9.88 - AM Pocket Radio 
Famous AM toot-a-loop Radio $9.50 Reg. $13.88 - AM Radio 



CLOCK RADIOS 

Reg. $49.95 RC 6253 - AMFM Digital Clock Radio $39.00 Reg. $54.95 RC 6362 - AMFM Digital Clock Radio 

PORTABLE PHONOGRAPH 

Reg. $21.95 SG 336 - Compact Phono with Battery and AC 

Reg. $29.95 SG 356 - Compact Phono with AM Radio Battery and AC 

Reg. $69.95 SG 100 - Portable Phono with AM Radio & Cassette Player 

Reg $39 95 SG 376 - Compact Phono with AMFM Radio and Battery - AC Opperation 



$8.00 
$11.00 



$34.00 



$16.00 
S24.00 
$48.00 
$32.00 



WHILE THEY LAST 

Reg. $399.95 Fisher Model 304B - 120 Watt 2/4 Channel AMFM Rec. 
Reg $499 95 Fisher Model 404 - 200 Watt 2/4 Channel AMFM Rec. 
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15 E. Pleasant St. 

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GLEN FALLS NY 



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Page 14 



THE SUAAMER solstice 



THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1974 



'Ski' releases finances 



Classifieds 



PERSONAL 



Kenneth R. Mosakowski of 
Amherst, a candidate for the 
Democratic Congressional 
nomination in the September 10th 
Democratic primary, today released 
a complete accounting of his 
personal finances and called upon 
his political opponents to do the 
same. 

Mosakowski's statement is as 
follows: 

"I am today releasing to the 
public a complete disclosure of my 
personal finances. In keeping with a 
desirable spirit of openness and 
honesty in government, I urge my 
Democratic primary opponent, 
attorney Thomas R. Manning of 
Pittsfield, and the Republican in- 
cumbent. Congressman Silvio 0. 
Conte of Pittsfield, to disclose 
publicly complete statements of 
their financial worth and their in- 
vestments — including those in- 
vestments which have been placed 
•n the names of close relatives. 

"I have computed my net worth, 
as of July 1, 1974, at $4,354.67, as 
itemized below: 

ASSETS 
Title of Lots 62 and 63, of 
Enos, Chappaquiddick, Dukes 
County, Mass., recorded with 
Dukes County Registry of Deeds, 
Edgartown, Mass., Book 318, Page 
06 - $1,000.00. 

Personal savings, Amherst 
Savings Bank, Amherst, Mass., 
Passbook Number 70640 — 
$1,149.67. 

Personal checking account, First 
National Bank of Amherst, 
Amherst, Mass., Account Number 
64-101-20 - $305.00. 

Personal belongings, books, 

furniture, etc. - $2,000. 

LIABILITIES 

"As shown by my 1973 Federal 

income tax return, I earned 

$5,694.00 in 1973 from employment 



at the University Library, University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass., 
and from free-lance newspaper 
writing, and $16.57 interest from 
my personal savings account — for 
a total income of $5,710.57. I paid a 
Federal income tax of $615.50 on 
my 1973 earnings. 

"I have no other assets or 
financial investments of any kind. 

"In order to wage a people's 



campaign completely free of 
corruption by special interests, I am 
informing all potential contributors 
that I will not accept an individual 
contribution in excess of $100.00 
from anyone. 

"I also intend to make public the 
names of all contributors to my 
campaign, at least two weeks prior 
to the September 10th primary 
election." 



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(f8-B 



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THURSDAY, JULY 2S, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page IS 



Persuasions could be best vocalist 



by DAVID SOKOL 
MORE THAN BEFORE - THE 
PERSUASIONS (A&M 3635) 
Total playing time: 33:05 

The live side of the Persuasions 
latest album opens with an M.C. 
introducing them as "the world's 
finest vocal group". A pretty 
sweeping statement indeed, but 
one which would be difficult to 
dispute. Their Street Corner 
Symphony was the first totally 
acappella record to break the Top 
100 on the album charts, and 
despite several label changes, the 
Persuasions have defied the 
averages and have continued to 
make records without instruments 



other than the most beautiful of 
them all, the human voice. They 
even poked a little fun at them- 
selves by entitling their last album. 
We Still Ain't Got No Band, while 
their vocals became richer, deeper, 
and blacker than ever. 

The Persuasions continue in their 
acappella tradition for one half of 
their newest recording. The live 
side of More Than Before contains 
magnificent versions of "Beauty's 
Only Skin Deep" and of a Bobby 
Womack styled "Lookin' For a 
Love" as well as a rich reading of 
the gospel "Jesus Build a Fence 
Around Me". 

The studio side of More Than 



Focus bit bullet 



HAMBURGER CONCERTO - 
Focus (Atco SD 36-100) Time: 
40;03 

Focus have bit the big bullet. The 
selections on this new stupioly 
titled LP are all, for various reasons, 
a chore to listen to. "Deletiae 
Musicae" and "La Cathedral de 
Strasbourg" suffer from vast 
esoterica, attempting to recreate 
Flemish court music of the 16th 
century. "Haren Scarem" is 
"Hocus Pocus" as performed by 
the Ventures. 

The big disappointment here, 
however, is the 20:15 long title 
combine the best elements of Bach 
church music and Clapton's 
"Badge;" hearing it in performance 
was like watching a towering 
scaffold being constructed in the 
middle of the stage. Hearing the 
distorted, shadowy version on the 
record is like throwing mud pies. 

Caustic 

Continued from P. 16 

credible String Band. The player 
eats their records. Grinds them up. 
Undoubtedly the stout maching 
could not cope with the String 
Band's silken medlocles and 
arrangements combined most 
bizarrely with their hard rope voices 
(reedy?) and quirky playing. 

Hard Rope & Silken Twine is 
delicious, without their often ex- 
cesses (too much Silken one way or 
Hard the other). 

"Maker Of Islands" is a swooner, 
"Glancing Love" is lovely, and the 
side long "Ithkos" has its special 
moments, though it sometimes 
gets a "Well, blah" feel. 

Dale should be able to spin this 
rope entwine in peace, (sic) 

A supple treat B. 



and you shouldn't have to stand for 
it. 

The title is accurate only in 
that the solo instruments are 
"wimpy." I saw them do this in 
concert when it was brand new and 
they mercifully hadn't even titled it. 



Before confirms my long held belief 
that back up band would make the 
Persuasions as potentially com- 
mercial as the Temptations,though 
hearing the Persuasions with a 
band is as musically redundant as 
hearing John McLaughlin with the 
London Symphony. But they've 
finally got a hit single with "I Really 
Got It Bad For You" and they 
certainly deserve the added 
recognition that this will un- 
doubtedly bring them. 

All five songs on the non- 
acappella side feature the polish 
and perfection of previous Per- 
suasions efforts, but by playing 
with a backup band, the Per- 
suasions are setting themselves up 
for musical comparison with other 
top notch vocal groups such as the 
Temps, while as an acappella 
group, they are in a class totally by 
themselves. 

BAD COMPANY - BAD COM- 
PANY (Swan Song SS 8410) 
Total playing time: 34:35 



When Free split up a while back, 

it wasn't taken nearly as seriously in 
America as it had been in their 
native England where a 
posthumous collectors' item en- 
titled The Free Story, containing a 
musical history of the band, 
became a most sought after 
recording. Only "All Right Now" 
made a dent here, marked by a 
simple rock structure and the 
powerful Paul Rodgers vocals 
which typified the Free sound. 
Several rock scholars have called 
Rodgers tne oest maie vocalist in 
the business, and it is Rodgers who 
is the focal point of Bad Company, 
England's latest quasi-super group, 
which also includes ex-Free 
drummer Simon Kirke, guitarist 
Mick Ralphs from Mott the Hoople, 
and bassist Boz Burrell from the 
Islands phase of King Crimson. 

Bad Company's first album 
features eight group originals 
(although titles like "Rock Steady", 



"Don't Let Me Down", and 

"Movin' On" have been used 
before), and ends up sounding 

more distinctly like ultimate Free 
than anything else. Rodgers, who 
passed up a singing job with the 
world renowned, though rapidly 
laming. Deep Purple, is excellent 
throughout, and the trio behind him 
is consistently sharp. 

The rocking "Can't Get Enough" 
has already hit big in England and 
would certainly be a refreshing 
change for American Top 40. Bad 
Company is virtually void of weak 
spots, with rock ballads "Ready For 
Love" (an improvement over 
Mott's version on A/I The Young 
Dudes) and "Seagull" fitting in 
beautifully with the harder stuff. 
Bad Company recalls the spirit of 
the all but forgotten English rock of 
the '60s and it will take a concerted 
effort to prevent it from becoming a 
hit. So far, the rock album of 1974. 




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Ben — 3:4.5-7:30 
Twi-Mtr — 5:15-5:45 



ADMISSION DURING TWILIGHT HOUR 1.25 



PSM U 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, JULY 2i, It74 



Editorials 




Reviews 



Yes, Nixon was a great turtle 



By ZAMIR NESTELBAUM 

I met a rare species the other day, 
walking his turtle down by the Fine 
Arts Center. The turtle was a huge 
600- pound Great Sea Turtle fully 
four feet long. Upon the exterior of 
his large cavernous shell stretched 
the gaudy red, white and blue 
plastic bumber sticker character 
reading "Get Off His Back". The 
gentleman scowled at several 
passers by and made threatening 
gestures at a young Chinese girl 
who tried to pet the enormous 
reptile. 



"Excuse me sir, but you are you 
realty walking a turtle?" I asked 
incredulously. "You're not one of 
the last remnants of the Guru in- 
vasions, are you?" 

"No I'm not, you impertinent 
nebob. Can't you see I'm taking me 
and mine for a stroll. I have a God 
given right to stroll. It's part of the 
sacred individual rights that our 
founding fathers laid down in the 
Constitution right their next to our 
God given right to pack a rod and 
recite prayers in the public 



schools." 

"What are you talking about, this 
strolling? What are you, the ad- 
vance guard of some weird An- 
tivivisectionist Society Convention? 
Stroll if you want to stroll. I just 
kinda think its funny for someone 
to be walking a huge turtle around 
and not let little kids ride it. It 
wouldn't hurt it." 

"Look wise guy," he said sar- 
donically, "do you know what this 
turtle's name is? Well for your 
bleedin heart liberal's information. 



Notes from the Undergrad 

Treatise on Homo-UMies 



By E. Patrick M. 

Recalling his last visit to the 
library, M displayed much 
hesitation and restraint as he erv 
tered the elevator. The doors 
proceeded to seal shut and a 
desperate voice plead that he wait. 

"Halt! Shtop zat elevatal Plez, 
shtopi" . 

He instantly pushed the Center 
Door Open button and a breathi«M, 
bushy moustached gentleman 
clamored aboard clutching an 
intriguing brown brief case. 

"Zank you, yung man," he said. 
M nodded in reirly and pushed the 
button to dose the apparatus. 

The elevator proceeded as usual 
and as usual canr>e to a lotting hauh 
somewhere between the 7th and 
13th ftoors. The lighted numbers 
did not designate their locality. M 



sighed under his breath in ex- 
pectation but the old man paced 
back and forth nervously. 

"Ha! Zis iz der vork of von 
Guttersmensch, za shvlne!" he 
suddenly exclaimed with a raised 
finger. 

'No," replied M calmly. "This Is 
the work of the Physical Plant ..." 

"He's been folloving me around 
for daz now. Ha! He viH shtop at 
nussing; he vill stoop zo lowl" 

"What?" 

"Oh, pardon me. I um provezzor 
BlamymirUrineoff; Harvard; Ph. D., 
MA, BA, BS. MD, DDT. and a few 
udder zings at dat." 

"Oh, Edward M; Amherst; SOB." 

"Zis fiend has been after mien 
research. Mien life long vorkl" 

"And that is?" 



Double Standards 



By STEPHEN CO AN 

Isn't it strange how people 
sometimes twist words around? 

For example when someone at a 
party tells you that you k>ok 
distinguished and you find yourself 
running to a mirror to find that new 
wrinkle. 

Or one of the old time favorites, 
"I'm a procrastinator and Sam's 
nothing but a lazy no good son of a 
gun." 

This one should go over big with 
the ladies. "I'm a Don Juan, a real 
ladies man, while she's a nym- 
phomaniac hopping in bed with 
every Tom, Dick or Harry she can 
find." 

Here's another big one for you. 
Have you ever noticed that 
overweight men are known as 
being jolly and overweight women 
are usually called fat. 

We also have differprit terms for 
,nen and women jrivers. He's a 
man of the road look how smoothly 
he weaves in and out of the traffic 
while if a woman does the same 
thing we call her a crazy woman 
driver. 

As you can see from my last five 
examples, we do live in a world of 
double standards. 

I can lie in bed all day and say I'm 
procrastinating which is fine with 
us, but if Sam does the same thing 
we automatically brand him a lazy 
no good son of a gun. 

There's also a pretty big double 
standard when it comes to things 
men and women can do which I 
hope my examples have pointed 
out, 

A Don Juan or a male driver is 
someone we both admire while we 
qenerally disapprove of nym- 



phomaniacs and especially women 
drivers and why are overweight 
men called jolly and overweight 
women fat? I guess it's just an area 
where the fairer sex has no choice 
but to come out the losers. 

This one's a favorite of mine, 
Howie, do you have a hangover? 
No but boy does my head hurt. 

Or, I'm a bit forgetful at times 
while Fred over there is senile. 

We also have double standards 
when it comes to our making 
mistakes and when someone else 
falls into the same trap we did. 

I'm naive and someone just took 
advantage of me while John over 
there should have known better. 

What about our double stan- 
dards in education? Someone we 
like is called a intellectual while 
someone we despise we call an 
egghead. 

Also it's okay for us when we 
grow older to forget things at times, 
but if Fred also forgets things 
occasionally we automatically call 
him senile even though we're guilty 
of the same thing. 

Which goes to show we can be 
quilty of the same thing as our 
neighbor but as long 3s we phrase 
our words the right way we can 
come out looking like a million 
dollars while our neighbor remains 
a fool. 

This my friends has been a game 
of semantics which Sidney Harris, a 
syndicated columnist first turned 
me on to which I hope you've 
enjoyed. Here's one to ponder over, 
I'm doing my own thing while your 
nothing but a hippie freak. 



"Ha! If only you knew. I zuppoze 
zat I should tell somevone zo dat 
von Guttersmensch can't claim it." 

"Well, is it a long story, cause I'm 
tired and I ..." 

"I haff discovered ze mizzing link 
in za evolution of mankind! Here, 
here at zis campus! M rerrHjved a 
spattering of saliva from his right 
eye after the professor's last 
comment. 

"I'm sorry, but I don't uiv- 
derstand what ..." 

"Veil, you know It dat first zer vas 
za ape, ya? Und zen zer vas zer 
man, ya? Veil, somevere inbetveen 
zej vas somezing else! Und I haff 
found h'm!" 

"Damn elevators. I kn«w I 
shouldn't ..." 



Zere vas homo- 

Australopithecus, homo— erectus 
Neanderthaensis, za Peking Man, 
za Java Man, and zen zer iz homo— 
sapien. I haff discovered ze homo— 
Umieus! Ze Amherst Man!" 
"Look, that's really great, but I .." 

"Und vhat a strange fellow he iz. 
Der a lots a strange people on diz 
campus ..." 

"Yes, I can testify to that For 
instance ..." 

"Ha! You should observe him. 
He resembles ze extinct American 
buffalo. First, in appearance and 
manner of behavior. Und zecond, 
neither shpecies can survive vlthout 
grass! All he can do is graze about 
und complain. Disgustink!" 

"Ya, well, listen, that's good, but 



"Let me tell you more about him. 
First in mankind, zer vas ze descent 
from ze trees; ze invention of tools; 
increase in za size of ze brain; the 
use of ze textbook; ze decrease in 
za size of ze brain und its com- 
plexity; ze disgarding of ze text- 
books; and finally ze return to ze 
trees!" 

"Fine, look ..." 

"Ha! Ze most interesting 
characteriztic of all iz ze return to 
primatiff mannerizms. Streakink for 
inztance!" 

Suddenly the elevators began to 
move and M pushed for the nearest 
floor. It stopped and opened. 

"I shall walk the rest of the way. 
Well, nice speaking to you." They 
saluted and the doors shut. M 
walked to the stairwell. 

He climbed about four flights and 
was joined by a well carried gen- 
tleman. He was about to tell him 
about the strange character he had 
met on the elevator when the lights 
went out. 

"Ah, well. It's to be expected," 
said M. 

"Expected, huh? Ha! Diz iz der 
vork of Urineoff. He iz ze most 
unscrupulouz fiend in zer vestern 
hemisphere, let me tell you about 
him ..." 



his name is Nixon. And everybody 
stays off of Nixons' back while I 
have anything to say about it." 

"Why? What's Nixon done to 
deserve such exemplary treatment. 
He'd be great in a three ring circus. 
Why all of the little kids would love 
him!" 

"No, you Cad, not that! You see, 
Nixon's story is a sad one. When I 
first saw him, he was the leader of 
all the shoq turtles at the San Diego 
Zoo. He virtually ran the whole 
operation. Him and his friends 
Eriichman Turtle and Haldeman 
Turtle. They blared Nixon's 
greatness to all the animals of the 
Zoo. In fact he even made a 
diplomatic visit to the leaders of the 
Snakes and the Pigs at the Zoo, 
establishing for the first time in Zoo 
History a peace between the rival 
animals. 

"They started printing their lies in 
the Zoo Post that Nixon somehow 
got out of his shell and was walking 
upright, pretending to be Frank 
Rizzo and shooting dissident 
turtles. Just because they found 

Caustic 



the gouged bodies of Dean Turtle, 
Martha Turtle and American People 
Turtle, with Nixon standino over 
their corpses, glowering with a 
frenzied delight. 

"Well, was Nixon guilty of these 
crimes as he obviously seemed to 
be!" I asked forthrightedly. 

"No Never! Nixon is a Great 
Turtle. He is Our Leader. Love it Or 
Leave! I've taken him away from his 
detractors so that he can regroup 
and maintain his grip on Turtledom. 
Nixon is always right. Get Off His 
Back, GET OFF HIS BACK!" the 
gentleman madly shouted, creating 
quite a stir among the tourists 
ogling the animated architecture of 
the Fine Arts Building. 

Suddenly, as we were standing 
there finishing our aborted con- 
versation, a lone rabbit came 
whizzing by very hurriedly moving 
toward an obvious destination. I 
recognized the rabbit — she was 
called Impeachment Hare. Nixon 
Turtle saw Her, ar>d laid down 
whimpering in the middle of the 
road and went to sleep. 



Comments 



By Mike Kostek 

Keep On SmUin' Wet Willie 
(Capricorn CP 0128) time 37:44. 

Now this it stupid. These boys 
have all the enthusiasm of a Poco, 
but that's it. They play everything 
cheap, trading in the k>ng range 
steadiness of tasteful rock, blues 
and soul for quickdraw k>west 
denominations of each. They take 
the flashiest trappings of each, 
convert them into Instantly Un- 
derstandible Energy for the 15 year 
olds. 

An ultimately cheapening and 
paling process D minus. 

Struggling Man Jimmy Cliff 
(Island SW-9343) time 42:35. 

Standard Jimmy Cliff reggae 
form, and more than a bit good. 
Even you could lose weight 
listening to hot stuff like 
"Struggling Man", "Sooner Or 
Later" and "Going Back West." 
Lyrics and overall sameness hurt. 



though not drastically. 
An occasional flash C plus. 

Okie J.J. Cale (Shelter SR21C7) 
time 28:32. Like a seeing-eye 
grounder, this one has eyes. Subtle, 
sneaky beauty is Cale's forte, with 
easily the most laid back music 
around. The overall time is short, 
but that's due to taste, not torque 
J.J. keeps things to a two minute 
norm. Hits: "Cajun Moon" 
"Anyway The Wind Blows", "I Got 
The Same Old Blues" "Crying". 

An eminently tasteful-tur>eful B 
plus. 

Hard Rope & Silken Twine — 
Incredible String Band (Reprise MS 
2198) time 43:41. 

A good friend of mine and yours. 
Dale H. Cook (one of WMA's 
Occasional Personalities) has a 
home player he used in a pinch. It 
serves him well enough, except 
when he wants to spin one of his 
true loves, the effervescent In- 



Campus Carousel 



By Tony Granite 

JOURNALISTS TO BE 

LITERATI is the word from the 
Journalistic Studies Director of the 
Department of English at UMass- 
Amherst. A vote of 17-13 by the 
11 7- member Department of English 
last May now requires every J- 
major to follow a double major with 
English 

Heretofore, students of all 
disciplines had been encouraged to 
opt for dual majors by simply taking 
15 hours of journalism courses. 

In stonewalling his proposal 
through the last meeting of the 
years, JS director Howard Ziff said 
he considered a journalist to be "a 
man of letters" and that literature, 
therefore, was the journalist's most 
important discipline. The an- 
nouncement reportedly came as 
news to three of the five full-time 
journalism faculty when printed 
minutes of the May 15 meeting of 
the English Department were 
distributed in June. 

OFF CAMPUS SURVIVAL 
MANUAL has been published by 
the Student Government of the 



USoFIa as a supplement to The 
Oracle, this summer. 

The 8- page insert answers 19 
questions about living off-campus 
and provides two full pages of 
apartments available to rent. 

Besides legal questions, answers 
are also given for such as "What 
should you do before you start 
looking for a place?" "What do you 
need to survive?" "How can you 
get along with your roommate(s)." 
"How about personal energy 
maintenance.?" 

ECOLOGIST AS WWO? There's 
another UMie making news. She is 
Dr. Ann Noble, a 30-year-old, blue- 
eyed blonde who has become the 
first female on the faculty of the 
UCal-Davis school of ecology. 

The UMass PhD tastes 20 new 
wines a day as part of a program of 
research on growing of grapes and 
making of wine. 

In a recent AP report, she sakl, "I 
don't dare swallow. It would kill you 
for sure, drinking all that wine." 



Profs, proclaim a Bill of Rights — sort of 



The following column was 
written for the Iowa State Daily by 
Bill Kunerth, associate professor of 
journalism and mass com- 
munication. 

Every instructor shall have the 
right to: 1. Choose those 
students who will be allowed to 
enroll in his courses. 

2. Drop any student within the 
first three weeks without the 
student's permission. 

3. Have three unexcused ab- 



sences from lectures each quarter. 

4. Take occasional naps during 
classroom discussions. 

5. Munch on candy bars and 
drink Cokes during lectures. 

6. Absent himself from lectures 
for impootant duties such as 
plugging parking meters. 

7. Arrive late for lectures if he has 
a legitimate excuse such as 
""oversleeping." 

8. Teach only those courses that 
motivate him and are relevant. 



9. Drop courses at mid-quarter if 
student motivation and interest 
levels are not satisfactory. 

10. Write evaluations on each 
student and publish them at the 
end of the quarter. 

11. Read the Daily and write 
letters during class discussions. 

12. Begin lectures the seventh 
week of the course and complete 
the entire quarter's work in the last 
three weeks. 

13 Show up once every three 



weeks and take issue with all points 
raised regarding material covered in 
the classes he missed. 

14. Call students at any time of 
night to discuss their performance 
on assignments. 

15. Withhold course 
requirements from students until 
Dead Week (the week prior to Final 
Week). 

16. Ask students if there was 
""anything important"" in th"^ 
assignments the instructor failed to 



read or grade. 

17. Burst into tears during In- 
structor-student conferences when 
all other tactics fail. 

18. Lecture on the American 
political situation no matter what 
the course title is. 

19. Be forgiven for poor lectures 
if he can provide a legitimate ex- 
cuse such as a "sick relative" or a 

"night on the town." 

20. Leave class one week before 
the qnd of the quarter because he 
has a ride to Ft. Lauderdale. 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 7 




recyclable 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



Scanlon pre(dicts more jobs, 
less red-tape for stucdents 



By MIKE KNEELAND 
Administration officials say they 
expect more work-study jobs to be 
available to students this Fall. 

Gerry Scanlon, head of the newly 
established Student Employment 
Task Team (SETT), also announced 
there should be a decrease in "red- 
tape"" encountered by both 
students seeking jobs and em- 
ployers seeking students. 

Students who have previously 
participated in work-study will be 
pre-placed in jobs, Scanlon said. 
After returning to school they need 
only consult the bulletin board in 
the Financial Aid Office to get their 
job assignment. 



The student workers will then 
report directly to their job super- 
visor. ""This should save a lot of 
time,'" Scanlon '•peculated. 

He noted, however, that students 
not satisfied with their job 
assignment may make an ap- 
pointment with one of the 
placem'-nt counselors to discuss 
the situation. 

Those who have never par- 
ticipated in the work-study will still 
be required to fill out the necessary 
forms in the Financial Aid Office 
and to be interviewed by one of the 
administrators. 

Scanlon said his office will try, as 
it has before, to match student 



interests and experiences with the 
jobs available. 

The SETT will not only handle 
work-study jobs, which is a form of 
financial aid and is thus based on 
need, but also jobs available 
through research grants and off 
campus employers. 

If a professor, for example, is 
granted a sum of money and 
decides he wants a paid assistant, 
then that professor will call SETT 
which will then select a few persons 
for the job. in the end, Scanlon 
said, the professor still hires the 
applicant of his own choice. 

The SETT director emphasized 
that ""grant money" is not based on 



Scholarship awards 



need as is work-study money. 

"In that respect," Scanlon noted, 
"we're like any other employment 
agency ... not actually selecting a 
student." 

Under the work-study program, 
the department or firm hiring the 
student only pays 20 per cent of the 
salary while 80 per cent of the wage 
is paid by the Financial Aid Office 
with Federally allocated money. 

That, Scanlon said Tuesday, is 
one reason why there should be 
more jobs available through work- 
study. 

Scanlon is also working out a 
method to standardize student 
wages. In the past, he noted, two 
students doing the same job might 
have been earning different wages 



because the money was coming 
from separate funds, or accounts. 

Now, such students will be 
receiving the same salary no matter 
what account their wages are being 
drawn from. 

During the semester, job 
openings available through SETT 
will be printed in the Daily 
Collegian. 

Scanlon warned students not to 
decide for themselves if they are 
entitled to on-campus work. 

'"The best way for students to 
get employment on campus," he 
said, "is not to pre-judge their own 
cases ... Come over to the Financial 
Aid Office and make out the ap- 
plications and let us process them." 



Senator launches probe 



By MARK VOGLER 
A state legislator has launched an 
investigation into the UMass 
disbursement of state Board of 
Higher Education funds. 

Acting in response to a 
graduate's allegations that the 
UMass Bursar's office is mishand- 
ling the scholarship awards. Sen. 
John H. Fitzpatrick (R-Stockbridge) 
said Friday he would refer the 
matter to a special legislative 
commission "if it's justified." 

Brian Allard, 21, of North Adams 
wrote a letter last week asking the 
senator to find out whether 



"certain people in the Bursar's 
office are tampering with the 
funds." 

Although Allard was oromised 
$300 from the board last August, he 
has only recently been reimbursed 
for money he personally paid the 
University when the funds were 
said to be unavailable. 

"This is just another case of the 
State being a dead beat," Sen. 
Fitzpatrick said. 

"Time after time the legislature 
passes bills for goods and services, 
the money is funded — but it 
frequently takes a long time for it to 



be released. 

"Every agency in the state is 
screaming that it's overworked and 
understaffed. Some are and some 
aren't. But we definitely need some 
kind of study in this area." 

Fitzpatrick said he intends to find 
out the answer to the problem after 
consulting with University and state 
officials. 

UMass Bursar Robert R. Mishol 
called Allard's request for an in- 
vestigation "a little extreme," but 
added his office would cooperate 
fully if one were conducted. 
(CentlBHcd od P. 3) 



House Mouse decrees 
'Hole-in-Wair award 




What's all thesmokt ab«ut? See page 8 and 9. 



Photo bv Ed tohwi 



The Housing Office of the 
Commuter Assembly has once 
again published House Mouse, a 
guide to off-campus housing. 

The 45-page yellow booklet is 
filled with valuable information for 
students seeking such housing. 

Sections are devoted to security 
deposits, housing discrimination, 
apartment listings, realtor listings, 
landlord obligations, and leases. 

House Mouse devotes page one 
to its "Hole in the Wall" award for 
the realtors "who didn't have thr 
time to assist in compiling the data 
presented in this publication." 

They included William Aubin Inc. 
of Amherst; Robert Brown Real 
Estate of Amherst; Town and 
Country of Amherst; Lincoln Realty 
of Amherst; O'Brien and Craig Real 
Estate of Easthampton; Farrick Real 
Estate of Hadley; Pioneer Realty of 
Hadley; Descarge Real Estate of 
Northampton; and Levin Real 
Estate of Northampton. 

The authors say the "Hole In the 
Wall" award will be given monthly 
"to those apartment owners, 
managers and even tenants who 
demonstrate their ability in 
providing, maintaining or creating 
housing problems in the UMass 
area." 

House Mouse points out that 
landlords must: 

- provide adequate hot and cold 
water 



— exterminate insects and 
rodents if they exist in two or more 
apartments in one building 

— provide a toilet, kitchen sink, 
wash basin, and one shower or 
bath tub free of leaks and clogged 
drains. 

— maintain the foundation, 
floors, walls, doors, ceilings, roof, 
staircases, porches and chimneys. 
All of these must be kept rodent 
proof, weathertight, watertight, 
and otherwise in good working 
order. 

House Mouse says a tenant 
must: 

— pay rent on time 

— cause no apartment damage 

— keep apartment clean 

— put garbage and rubbish in the 
cans provided 

— kill any if>8ects or rodents in 
the apartment and notify the 
landlord 

— be a good neighbor. 

The booklet also points out that 
all deposits held on or after Jan. 1 
1972 must draw five per cent in- 
terest a year and that the deposit 
should be paid back to the tenants 
within 30 days. If the landlord fails 
to return the deposit within 30 days, 
the tenant may sue in Small Claims 
Court for double the amount 
wrongfully withheld. 

House Mouse is available in the 
Housing Office in Whitmore. 



Page 2 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST T, 1»74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«9e 3 



Free Jazz concert this week 




NORM CONNORS 



UMies to visit Japan 



AMHERST Mass. - Two 
Japanese scholars are in Amherst 
this week to formally invite 10 
students and a faculty member 
from the University of Massachu- 
setts to Japan for a two-week 
friendship visit. 

Professor Shinichi Takaku and 
Mr. Minoru Sakamoto of Hokkaido 
University in Sapporo, Japan are 
inviting the UMass group to be one 
of several participating in a program 
begun by the Japanese Ministry of 
Education and sponsored by the 
Association of International 
Education in Japan. 



Dr. Richard B. Woodbury, acting 
dean of the UMass-Amherst 
Graduate School, and the 10 
students will leave the Uniied 
States August 17 and return 
August 31, having visited Tokyo, 

Kyoto and Sapporo, and having 
attended seminars and talks on the 
society and culture of Japan. 

Hokkaido University was 
founded in 1871 by the third UMass 
president, William S. Clark. Since 
then there have been many signs of 
friendship between the two 
schools, including the teaching and 
studying of scholars from Hokkaido 
to UMass, and UMass to Hokkaido. 



Oldest man in U.S. speaks 



ByBNS 

Wet!, if you ask the oldest person 
in the United States what he thinks 
about the younger generation, 
you'll find that he thinks they're 
"going to hell and has been for the 
past 100 years." 

Charlie Smith, who came to the 
U.S. on a slave ship in 1854, and is a 
former slave. Is still unsure when he 



was born, but believes it was in 
1842 in Liberia, West Africa. But 
one thing he's not unsure about is 
the younger generation. 

"The young generation, both 
white and colored (BLACK) there 
ain't nothing to them," Smith said 
on his 132rd birthday. "I've been 
saying that for 100 years." 



r 



w 



THE SUMMER 



. 




EDITORS 



Michael D. Kneeland" 



Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 
AD LAYOUT 



Steve Ruggles 
Betsy T.Wilkes 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole Signerl editorials, columns, reviews. 
cartoons, and letters represent the persor^al views of the authors 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. 
p.m. 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
Norman Connors, noted jazz 
drummer, will be appearing here in 
concert Wednesday, August 7, at 7 
p.m. on Metawampe Lawn (behind 
the Student Union). Connors is a 
composer, performer, and band 
leader, who has captured the 
imagination and allegiance of the 
finest of his musical con- 
temporaries. 

There is no simple way to 
describe this man's music. One 
attempt compares it to "walking 
into a garden of vivid musical 
colors." Connors has been playing 
drums and writing music since the 



4:30 




age of five, and has performed, 
written, and recorded with many 
top artists. In particular, is the 
Pharoah Sanders Quintet. Connors 
feels that working with Sanders 
was one of his most rewarding 
associations, since Sanders' 
concepts have given him the op- 
portunity to develop as an in- 
fluential stylist in the art of per- 
cussion. 

Connors has an impressive 
history of musical study: with 
Gilbert Stanton at the Henry Glass 
School of Music in Philadelphia; 
with Ellis Tollin and Paul Patterson 
at Music City; composition at the 



Settlement House School of Music 
in Philadelphia. Connors also at- 
tended Temple University for two 
years following with study at the 
Julliard School of Music in New 
York, where he majored in per- 
cussion and composition. 

In addition to his affiliation with 
the Sanders Quintet, Connors has 
worked with the Marion Brown 
Quartet, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra, 
and Jackie McLean. 

Come and enjoy the man and his 
music on August 7. The concert is 
free to all. In case of rain, it will be 
held in the Student Union 
Ballroom, where summer Student 
I.D. holders will be admitted first. 



Indian dancer performing 



The UMass community will have 
a rare opportunity to witness 
exquisite and authentic classical 
and popular rlances of India on 
Thursday, August 8 at 7:30 p.m. in 

the Engineering East Auditorium. 
The program, sponsored by the 
India Association at the University, 
features Sumathy Kaushal who is a 
leading exponent of Indian dance 
from Hyderabad, India. 



Sumathy's talents blossomed 
even at the young age of five. She 
has given over 1,000 performances 
all over India and won the ad- 
miration and critical acclaim of 
connoisseurs of this great art of 
India. The Art Lovers of Madras 
recently bestowed on her the title 
of Natya Rani (The Queen of 
Dance). 

Besides being an outstanding 
dancer, Sumathy has contribured 
substantially to the modernization 
and popularization of this ancient 
legacy. She is her own 
choreographer and blends tala 
(time measure), laya (rhythm) and 
abhinaya (expression) into an 
exquisite whole. She has organized 
a highly successful dance school at 
Hyderabad. While at UMass, she 
will also give a teach-in demon- 
stration of the steps and gestures of 
Indian dance on August 7 as part of 
the Summer Noon Hour Music 
Program in the Campus Center 
Concourse. 

Admission is by tickets at $1.50 
per person. For tickets, reservations 
and information call 256-6410, 549- 
1388 or 549-1149. 



There's more 
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Performing an Indian dance 





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Prisons: big business in U.S. 



By WILLIE JOHNSON 

When one drives through the 
Georgia landscape, upon modern 
thruways, and super hiphways, the 
thought of "criminals" never 
crosses ones mind. In fact crime is 
the last thought on your mind as 
the smoothness of the highways, 
and the lushness of the Georgia 
lands parade in front of your eyes. 

Yet, crime is what built those 
large expansive highways. Crime is 
what will continue to build super 
highways, in Georgia and rake in 
millions of dollars of revenue for the 
State Government. How is this 
done? 

To answer that question one 
must look at the Penal situation in 
this nation from a different per- 
spective. Economics is the answer 
to this question, and economics will 
be the reason for future prisons. 

Let us jump across a continent, 
to take a look at the "most" 
progressive penal system in the 
United States ... the California 
Department of Corrections. Here 
upon the surface we see all manner 



of "self-help" and other op- 
portunities open to the ^convicted 
felon. Yet, under this veneer of 
"opportunity", we find traditional 
graft and corruption eating away at 
the foundations that are supposed 
to rehabilitate the criminal offender. 

For instance the California Penal 
system has an inmate welfare fund 
which numbers in the millions of 
dollars but which is used by all the 
institutions all over the State as a 
"slush" fund. What happens to the 
interest off this money which is 
held by Bank of America at five per 
cent annually? 

The inmate welfare fund is 
supported largely by the inmate's 
hobby crafts, and art work. The 
I.W.F. charges inmates from 25 per 
cent for paintings, to 15 per cent for 
leather work off the sale of their 
work. This money is then deposited 
in a C.D.C. Account which is then 
supposed to be us J for buying 
equipment and other recreational 
items, (i.e., football uniforms, etc.) 
but which never materializes. 

Another aspect of the 



economical aspects of prisons, lies 
in the fact that, (again look at 
California), inmates aren't allowed 
to have cash in their possession, 
therefore, they must have all money 
deposited in the bank, (payable to 
the Department of Corrections) 
which adds up to a vast sum of 
money, (considering their 30,000 
inmates) and that some inmates 
receive $30.00 a month, every 
month from home, as much as 
thirty dollars every month. What 
happens to the interest off this vast 
sum of money: No one knows. 

In the South things are more 
open, guards get their graft directly 
from the institution, such as fifty 
pounds of "beans", corn, etc., 
whenever the crops come in. A 
guard with a good crew, gets even 
a double portion. Therefore, the 
emphasis is on work, and every 
convict works ... ill or well he will 
work. Also, guards receive extra 
money from the inmates them- 
selves for favors, such as allowing 
one "old timer", the right to rape 
and marry a younger convict. The 



lend lease program is another 
means of prison officials making 
money. 

Lend Lease? Yes, this process is 
as old as penal institutions in this 
nation. When a farmer wants his 
crops harvested, he goes to a local 
prison and makes a deal with the 
warden and gives him a certain sum 
of money, in exchange the warden 
orders the convicts to harvest the 
farmers crops. In the days just after 
the civil war, black men were 
arrested at random , imprisoned 
and used for this money making 
process. 

Another economical reason that 
prisons function off of is the fact 
that justice in this country is limited 
to those that can afford it. Poor and 
other minorities are treated in such 
a slip shod manner to maintain a 
steady flow of convicts. 

The only solution to correct 
treatment of inmates lies in the 
removal of the "profit motive" from 
the business of rehabilitation. Laws 
must be passed that will remove the 
arbitrary power of the parole boards 



of this nation, so as to give 
prisoners certain human rights. 
Labor unions must be established 
and minimum wages paid, so that 
convicts learn how to work and 
receive pay for their labors. The list 
of corrections are infinite but if this 
society is to survive, then prisons 
must be changed. 

My Neighbors 




*^I now pronounce you a 
viable relation8hip!*\ . . 



defense school opens 






ByBNS 

The Shen-Twa school of "Street 
defense" has opened in the New 
Africa House subterrain level. This 
course consists of methods of 
defense that are taken from the 
Asian Masters, and other systems 
of defense. Some techniques are 
the development of military forces, 
(such as Special Forces, Rangers, 
and the Marines), other techniques 
are from various police agencies, 
and certain elements of the criminal 
societies around the world. 

The main idea behind this school 
is the fact that violence has always 
been "used" against the oppressed 
communities, and especially Black 
People by certain lawless forces in 
this society. Therefore having 
exhausted the "non-violent" 



methods of Martin Luther King, we 
have come to the stage where a 
Black man must be prepared to 
defend his life at any moment. It is 
our hope that with this knowledge 
Black people, (and other interested 
persons), will learn control, 
tolerance, and better insight into 
themselves and others. 

The martial arts are a systematic, 
problematic, solution finding, 
process that teaches health, 
relaxation, and confidence. The 
Shen-Twa School of Street 
Defense is open Monday, Wed- 
nesday, and Friday, in New Africa 
House from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 
a.m. and evening classes are from 
6:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. This 
course is open to everyone and it is 
"free" of charge. 



Bursar's office under fire 



(Continued from P. 1) 

"We would in fact welcome it, 
there's no problem with our office. 
Our records are open to any 
student at any time," Mishol said. 

"The problem isn't in our office. 
There seems to be a delay in 
Bostoii which is getting worse each 
year. I can't understand why it 
takes as long as five months for 
those funds to come in." 

Mishol said the board's office 
appears to be greatly understaffed. 




Although a check of approximately 
$300,000 was promised UMass 
recipients of the scholarship last 
semester, the University was forced 
to loan out $15 to $20,000 to those 
students who needed the money, 
he added. 

"Many schools throughout the 
state are quite disturbed about the 
situation," Mishol said. 

"Money has always been delayed 
during my 10 years as bursar. And I 



think it needs desperate attention." 
He said Allard's personal 
situation was "a mis'm- 
derstanding." According to Mishol, 
Allard could have received credit 
for the scholarship by deducting 
the awarded amount from each 
semester's bill. 

"However, by paying the total 
bill, the University couldn't reim- 
burse him if the funds weren't 
there," he said. 



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1 « i»«»<»<*«k^«» •»•♦••»«•••*«• 



•«*»,> Kvi-rrrr 



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Page 2 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pate 3 



Free Jazz concert this week 




By JACKIE BLOUNT 
Norman Connors, noted jazz 
drunnmer, will be appearing here in 
concert Wednesday, August 7, at 7 
p.m. on Metawampe Lawn (behind 
the Student Union). Connors is a 
composer, performer, and band 
leader, who has captured the 
imagination and allegiance of the 
finest of his musical con- 
temporaries. 

There is no simple way to 
describe this man's music. One 
attempt compares it to "walking 
into a garden of vivid musical 
colors." Connors has been playing 
drums and writing music since the 



NORM CONNORS 



UMies to visit Japan 



AMHERST Mass. - Two 
Japanese scholars are in Amherst 
this week to formally invite 10 
students and a faculty member 
from the University of Massachu- 
setts to Japan for a two- week 
friendship visit. 

Professor Shinichi Takaku and 
Mr. Minoru Sakamoto of Hokkaido 
University in Sapporo, Japan are 
inviting the UMass group to be one 
of several participating in a program 
begun by the Japanese Ministry of 
Education and sponsored by the 
Association of International 
Education in Japan. 



Dr. Richard B. Woodbury, acting 
dean of the UMass-Amherst 
Graduate School, and the 10 
students will leave the Uniied 
States August 17 and return 
August 31, having visited Tokyo, 

Kyoto and Sapporo, and having 
attended seminars and talks on the 
society and culture of Japan. 

Hokkaido University was 
founded in 1871 by the third UMass 
president, William S. Clark. Since 
then there have been many signs of 
friendship between the two 
schools, including the teaching and 
studying of scholars from Hokkaido 
to UMass, and UMass to Hokkaido. 



Oldest man in U.S. speaks 



By BNS 

Well, if you ask the oldest person 
in the United States what he thinks 
about the younger generation, 
you'll find that he thinks they're 
"going to hell and has been for the 
past 100 years." 

Charlie Smith, who came to the 
U.S. on a slave ship in 1854, and is a 
former slave, is still unsure when he 



was born, but believes it was in 
1842 in Liberia, West Africa. But 
one thing he's not unsure about is 
the younger generation. 

"The young generation, both 
white and colored (BLACK) there 
ain't nothing to them," Smith said 
on his 132rd birthday. "I've been 
saying that for 100 years." 




EDITORS 

Michael D. Kneeland" Rudolph F. Jones 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 
AD LAYOUT 



Steve Ruggles 
Betsy T.Wilkes 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts. The 
staff is responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
ministrators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper. They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials, columns, reviews, 
cartoons, and letters represent the personal views of the authors. 



I 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. 
p.m. 



4:30 




age of five, and has performed, 
written, and recorded with many 
top artists. In particular, is the 
Pharoah Sanders Quintet. Connors 
feels that working with Sanders 
was one of his most rewarding 
associations, since Sanders' 
concepts have given him the op- 
portunity to develop as an in- 
fluential stylist in the art of per- 
cussion. 

Connors has an impressive 
history of musical study: with 
Gilbert Stanton at the Henry Glass 
School of Music in Philadelphia; 
with Ellis Tollin and Paul Patterson 
at Music City; composition at the 



Settlement House School of Music 
in Philadelphia. Connors also at- 
tended Temple University for two 
years following with study at the 
Julliard School of Music in New 
York, where he majored in per- 
cussion and composition. 

In addition to his affiliation with 
the Sanders Quintet, Connors has 
worked with the Marion Brown 
Quartet, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra, 
and Jackie McLean. 

Come and enjoy the man and his 
music on August 7. The concert is 
free to all. In case of rain, it will be 
held in the Student Union 
Ballroom, where summer Student 
I.D. holders will be admitted first. 



Indian dancer performing 



The UMass community will have 
a rare opportunity to witness 
exquisite and authentic classical 
and popular dances of India on 
Thursday, August 8 at 7:30 p.m. in 

the Engineering East Auditorium. 
The program, sponsored by the 
India Association at the University, 
features Sumathy Kaushal who is a 
leading exponent of Indian dance 
from Hyderabad, India. 



Sumathy's talents blossomed 
even at the young age of five. She 
has given over 1,000 performances 
all over India and won the ad- 
miration and critical acclaim of 
connoisseurs of this great art of 
India. The Art Lovers of Madras 
recently bestowed on her the title 
of Natya Rani (The Queen of 
Dance). 

Besides being an outstanding 
dancer, Sumathy has contribured 
substantially to the modernization 
and popularization of this ancient 
legacy. She is her own 
choreographer and blends tala 
(time measure), laya (rhythm) and 
abhinaya (expression) into an 
exquisite whole. She has organized 
a highly successful dance school at 
Hyderabad. While at UMass, she 
will also give a teach-in demon- 
stration of the steps and gestures of 
Indian dance on August 7 as part of 
the Summer Noon Hour Music 
Program in the Campus Center 
Concourse. 

Admission is by tickets at $1.50 
per person. For tickets, reservations 
and information call 256-6410, 549- 
1388 or 549-1149. 



There's more 
to a bicycle 

than the name 

on the frame. 




See your specialists with: 

Rentals 

24 Hour Repair Service 
Sales, New & Used 
Touring & Racing Accessories 
Personal Attention to all Cycling 
needs 




/ £ Pleasant St. 
Amherst 
349-6904 




Performing an Indian dance 





"Hair is the only Ihiiij; that will really prevent baldness." 
(Drew Berkowil/) 



THE 



RUSTY NAIL INN 



presents 



rinir><laN - Sunday 



FAT 



Women's Little Jewel 



Turstlav 



^ rdiH'sHav 



Real Tears 



Clean Living 



Rte. 47, Sunderland 665-4937 

Takr Hte. lUi north, lako left after Trnnis \i adrmv and 
follov\ ((» <>nd. Takr anothri h-ft, L'OO vards and vourr 



Prisons: big business in U.S. 



By WILUE JOHNSON 

When one drives through the 
Georgia landscape, upon modern 
thruways, and super highways, the 
thought of "criminals" never 
crosses ones mind. In fact crime is 
the last thought on your mind as 
the smoothness of the highways, 
and the lushness of the Georgia 
lands parade in front of your eyes. 

Yet, crime is what built those 
large expansive highways. Crime is 
what will continue to build super 
highways, in Georgia and rake in 
millions of dollars of revenue for the 
State Government. How is this 
done? 

To answer that question one 
must look at the Penal situation in 
this nation from a different per- 
spective. Economics is the answer 
to this question, and economics will 
be the reason for future prisons. 

Let us jump across a continent, 
to take a look at the "most" 
progressive penal system in the 
United States ... the California 
Department of Corrections. Here 
upon the surface we see all manner 



of "self-help" and other op- 
portunities open to the ^convicted 
felon. Yet, under this veneer of 
"opportunity", we find traditional 
graft and corruption eating away at 
the foundations that are supposed 
to rehabilitate the criminal offender. 

For instance the California Penal 
system has an inmate welfare fund 
which numbers in the millions of 
dollars but which is used by all the 
institutions all over the State as a 
"slush" fund. What happens to the 
interest off this money which is 
held by Bank of America at five per 
cent annually? 

The inmate welfare fund is 
supported largely by the inmate's 
hobby crafts, and art work. The 
I.W.F. charges inmates from 25 per 
cent for paintings, to 15 per cent for 
leather work off the sale of their 
work. This money is then deposited 
in a C.D.C. Account which is then 
supposed to be us d for buying 
equipment and other recreational 
items, (i.e., football uniforms, etc.) 
but which never materializes. 

Another aspect of the 



economical aspects of prisons, lies 
in the fact that, (again look at 
California), inmates aren't allowed 
to have cash in their possession, 
therefore, they must have all money 
deposited in the bank, (payable to 
the Department of Corrections) 
which adds up to a vast sum of 
money, (considering their 30,000 
inmates) and that some inmates 
receive $30.00 a month, every 
month from home, as much as 
thirty dollars every month. What 
happens to the interest off this vast 
sum of money: No one knows. 

In the South things are more 
open, guards get their graft directly 
from the institution, such as fifty 
pounds of "beans", corn, etc., 
whenever the crops come in. A 
guard with a good crew, gets even 
a double portion. Therefore, the 
emphasis is on work, and every 
convict works ... ill or well he will 
work. Also, guards receive extra 
money from the inmates them- 
selves for favors, such as allowing 
one "old timer", the right to rape 
and marry a younger convict. The 



lend lease program is another 
means of prison officials making 
money. 

Lend Lease? Yes, this process is 
as old as penal institutions in this 
nation. When a farmer wants his 
crops harvested, he goes to a local 
prison and makes a deal with the 
warden and gives him a certain sum 
of money, in exchange the warden 
orders the convicts to harvest the 
farmers crops. In the days just after 
the civil war, black men were 
arrested at random , imprisoned 
and used for this money making 
process. 

Another economical reason that 
prisons function off of is the fact 
that justice in this country is limited 
to those that can afford it. Poor and 
other minorities are treated in such 
a slip shod manner to maintain a 
steady flow of convicts. 

The only solution to correct 
treatment of inmates lies in the 
removal of the "profit motive" from 
the business of rehabilitation. Laws 
must be passed that will remove the 
arbitrary power of the parole boards 



of this nation, so as to give 
prisoners certain human rights. 
Labor unions must be established 
and minimum wages paid, so that 
convicts learn how to work and 
receive pay for their labors. The list 
of corrections are infinite but if this 
society is to survive, then prisons 
must be changed. 

My Nei^bliors 




**I now pronounce you a 
viable relationship!'^. . . 



defense school opens 






By BNS 

The Shen-Twa school of "Street 
defense" has opened in the New 
Africa House subterrain level. This 
course consists of methods of 
defense that are taken from the 
Asian Masters, and other systems 
of defense. Some techniques are 
the development of military forces, 
(such as Special Forces, Rangers, 
and the Marines), other techniques 
are from various police agencies, 
and certain elements of the criminal 
societies around the world. 

The main idea behind this school 
is the fact that violence has always 
been "used" against the oppressed 
communities, and especially Black 
People by certain lawless forces in 
this society. Therefore having 
exhausted the "non-violent" 



methods of Martin Luther King, we 
have come to the stage where a 
Black man must be prepared to 
defend his life at any moment. It is 
our hope that with this knowledge 
Black people, (and other interested 
persons), will learn control, 
tolerance, and better insight into 
themselves and others. 

The martial arts are a systematic, 
problematic, solution finding, 
process that teaches health, 
relaxation, and confidence. The 
Shen-Twa School of Street 
Defense is open Monday, Wed- 
nesday, and Friday, in New Africa 
House from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 
a.m. and evening classes are from 
6:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. This 
course is open to everyone and it is 
"free" of charge. 



Bursar's office under fire 



(Continued from P. 1) 

"We would in fact welcome it, 
there's no problem with our office. 
Our records are open to any 
student at any time," Mishol said. 

"The problem isn't in our office. 
There seems to be a delay in 
Boston which is getting worse each 
year. I can't understand why it 
takes as long as five months for 
those funds to come in." 

Mishol said the board's office 
appears to be greatly understaffed. 




Although a check of approximately 
$300,000 was promised UMass 
recipients of the scholarship last 
semester, the University was forced 
to loan out $15 to $20,000 to those 
students who needed the money, 
he added. 

"Many schools throughout the 
state are quite disturbed about the 
situation," Mishol said. 

"Money has always been delayed 
during my 10 years as bursar. And I 



think it needs desperate attention." 
He said Allard's personal 
situation was "a mis'in- 
derstanding." According to Mishol, 
Allard could have received credit 
for the scholarship by deducting 
the awarded amount from each 
semester's bill. 

"However, by paying the total 
bill, the University couldn't reim- 
burse him if the funds weren't 
there," he said. 



An aloe plant can live for two 
or three years without water 
or earth! 




Capture The Flavor 
of Old Deerfield 

& Colonial 
America at the 



The Gables Olde Taverne 



BROiiiP Ll¥i LO$SriR SPiCM 

Lobster, Toss Salad, Potato, H'^memade 

Rolls, Coffee 

$4.9S 



GOWMBT eUlMBMKi 

Home Made Clam Chowder 

Little Neck Clams or Shrimp Cocktail 

Steamed Clams Broiled Lobster 

Salad - Frencli Fries— Rolls - Butter 

Dessert - - Coffee 

S«.95 



NEW!!! 

Texas Instruments 

electronic colculotor 

TI-1500 



P« 



w 



$»•• 



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nsmmiMi's nAmn 

Scallops Haddock 

Shrimp Baked Stuffed Clam 

Salad French Fries 

Roils - Butter Coffee 

$3.95 



• ftff Cnr$9 Phmn $hH §t ^3.00 



$iii^a§H 



Featuring — Roast Turkey, Hot Baked Ham, Sliced Roasf Beef, 
Lobster Newburg, Swedish Meat Balls, Celery and Olives, Hom«« 
Baked Beans, Baked Ravioli and Cheese, Potato, Tossed Garden 
Fresh Salad, Dessert, Coffee, Rolls, Butter. 




• inHrtilnmiHf TtaiMp - S$hifdip For dance and sing ALONG Good Times 



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66S-4643 



Follow Rte. 116 from Amherst to Rtes. 5 and 10 in South Deer- 
field, North 2 miles on right. — 






Autonnatic constant permits repetitive multiplication or 

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Percent key allows easy calculation of taxes, discounts, 

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Tl's smallest pocket portable — weighs less than 7 ounces 

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Rechargeable battery or AC operation — operates from 2 

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Solid state components and integrated circuitry for long, 

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■ Built-in precision and reliability backed by one-year 

Texas Instruments warranty. 

University Store 

Campus Center 



»»H»»t»<>i««»»«»»-.'.«.-*««r«»«r» V V *.W.».v. -■« 



Page 4 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



New regs. for grad students 



In a recent memo to Graduate 
Student, Dean Eugene Piedmont 
announced 5 of the 15 new 
regulations and procedures ap- 
proved over the last academic year 
by the Graduate Council of the 
Faculty Senate. While the 
Document is much to long to be 
reproduced here, it is essential that 
graduate students be aware of the 
hanging academic and ad- 
ministrative environment. The 
complete report is available in the 
Graduate Senate Office, 923 
Campus Center, and has also been 



sent to the Graduate Program 
Directors and Department Heads — 
Chairpersons. 

Perhaps the most important of 
these new procedures is the 
Graduate School Grievance 
Procedure, document GS M-GPD 
12, which specifies the conditions 
under and the means by which a 
graduate student may bring a 
formal complaint against the 
University or any of its units or 
functionaries. Until now there has 
been no such Document, and 
previous cases have often led to 



SGA seeks better 



extended and ad hoc procedures 
I. ■■•^es, civil court. While a 

studeru . ,11 have the option to take 
his- her case to court, the grievance 
procedure, developed for the most 
part by graduate students, who 
hold the majority position on the 
Student Affairs Committee of the 
Graduate Council, represent a 
major development in the establish- 
ment of graduate student rights. It 
should be noted that documents 3 
and 6 of this series require 
departments to specify in detail all 
procedures and criteria relating to 
the administrative and academic 



more student 



image; 
involvement 



A public relations offensive titled 
"Yes, We're Responsible," has 
been launched by the Student 
Government Association (SGA). 

Richard Savini, SGA president, 
said the purpose of the campaign 
will be to get students more in- 
volved with the SGA and to show 
students the SGA does meaningful 
work. 

Savini said posters will be made 
with the title "Yes, We're 



Responsible" next to an inverted 
pyramid which will contain many of 
the activities under the control of 
the SGA, such as the lecture note 
service. 

Savini said the campaign is a 
follow-up of one begun by former 
SGA president Nick Apostola: "The 
Student Government Craves New 
Blood." 

Savini also said the SGA has 
begun producing "a festival of 



Management Seminars 
offered this month 



AMHERST* Mass. - Three-day 
seminars on management are being 
offered this month by the School of 
Business Administration and the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

Each seminar is designed for 
supervisors or managers in various 
stages of careers. 

From Aug. 5 through 7, 
"Management by Objectives" will 
be given for top and middle 
managers in any organization. 
"Improving Management Skills," a 
program for new and prospective 
managers, is scheduled for Aug. 7 
through 9. Principal speakers for 
both seminars will be: David L. 
Ward, director of the Business 
Laboratory Program at Chicago 
State University; Gary L. 
Pielemeier, administrator of the 
Business and Administration 
Department Insurance Program, 
also at Chicago; and Leonard G. 
Smith, executive director of 
Training Services, Inc. of New 
Jersey. 

"Project Management: Planning 
Scheduling and Control" is 
designed for managers and officials 
interested in learning or reviewing 
the new management concept 
described in the seminar title. It is 
specially directed at industrial and 
governmental managers concerned 



with effectively managing venture 
and projects where the cost, 
schedule and performance of 
programs must meet rigid 
requirements. 



community spirit" to be held Sept. 
5. In a memo to various student 
organizations, he raid the purpose 
of the festival will be "to get this 
academic year started on the solid 
footing of community spirit." 

Savini hopes a number of tables 
will be set up at the Southwest 
athletic field. "Some suggestions 
have been bicycle registration from 
the police department, housing 
information from the housing 
office, recruitment for student 
organizations, residence hall in- 
formation, alumni association 
information, and recruitment for 
various athletic activities and 
virtually any other thing ... which 
might interest or help members of 
the University community," Savini 
wrote. 

Savini said there will be con- 
tinuous music from 1 p.m. to 
midnight. He said the Campus 



environment of graduate studies. 
Each graduate student should be 
fully informed of conditions in her- 
her Department as it will be these 
regulations, for the most part, on 
which substantive decisions will be 
made under the Grievance 
Procedures. 

The most notable aspects of the 
new procedure is the specif icatio". 
of certain rights: Right to speedy 
Resolution, Right to Legal Council, 
Right to be present at proceedings, 
confidentially and advance notice 
of non-academic withdrawal. The 
procedure itself specifies a hierachy 
of appeal beginning at the 
departmental level and ending with 
the Chancellor. At each level the 
student has authority in the 
selection of agrievance committee 
on a par with the other parties, and 
is free to choose another graduate 
student if desired. The complete 
document is 8 pages and should be 
examined by every graduate 
student. As the Student Affairs 
Committee is a standing committee 
of the Graduate Council, am- 
mendments to the procedure can 
be considered at anytime. If any 
graduate student, upon 



Classifieds 



SERVICES 



examination of the document, finds 
any omissions or objectionable 
points, these should be com- 
municated to the executive 
committee of the Graduate Senate. 

Document 14 of this series 
specifies that, beginning in June 
1975, the tuition waiver will require 
a minimum service of $1800 per 
year and one full semester's ser- 
vice. 

Document 2 announces the 
termination of the individual in- 
terdiscplinary Ph.D. program ex- 
cept for candidates who are already 
enrolled. Candidates currently 
completing Master's Degrees will 
have to apply to conventional 
Doctorate programs if they wish to 
pursue a Doctorate at UMass- 
Amherst. 

Again, these represent a 
selection and synopsis of the 15 
new regulations. Responsibility for 
notification rests with the student 
as well as the department and the 
graduate schools. The complete 
document is available at the 
Graduate School Offices. For 
further information call: The 
Graduate Senate, 5-0970, 5-2890, or 
drop in at 923 Campus Center. 



Car repair hassles? Experienced 
I mechanic will fix it right. No problem to 
I large or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
I Bob. 2.53-7241. 

in-is 
I ROOM WANTED 



RESEARCH 

Si-iid ii r»i- our mail order catalogue. 
('OMi|>lele Educational HeKearch 
S«T\ic<- incl. Term paper research, 
thesis ri'sparch. etc. ( tH.I.KCilATK 
Hi:si: \l« II SVSTKMS. IWNI K. Kerry 
\«i- . Illdg: Suite 2».'>. ( ampden. \.l 
ONIIM. Tel. MI!l-<<(>2-(i77T. lin.Otm 
l<i:siv\l<( II l>.\l>KUS«»N KII.K. Mrs: 
in-.'i iM-K). Mi-I (.St. (|2.».'i per page. 7 
dii> dfli^rry). 

tf 



Would like riMHii M-kitch priv or 2 bdrm 
;i|il in I iii'iil iii'cu near Amherst. I'ref l.ev- 
lliidlo .S4-pt. I (all .>t<Miiri. from :i-H p.m. 

tfK-S 



„ ^ Center will be serving beer and soft 
Further information on all three ^^^^^^ ^-^^^ ^^^^ 

managerinent seminars may be university Food Services, he 
obtamed frorri^ Continuing ^^.^ .^ preparing a bar-b-que for 
Education, 920 Campus Center, ^^g, ^j^^^^ ^^(^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^j^j^^, 
University of Massachusetts, ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^g, 

ticket plan. 

Said Savini, "We feel this festival 
will be good for our community." 



of 

Amherst, Mass. 01002; or from Dr. 
Bertil Liander at the UMass School 
of Business. 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long. Let us shape and 
maintain your hair through the long 
hot summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers by RK and A.MINO PON. 
Your style center. 2S3-9K84. 
Collegetown Unisex. 183 No. Pleasant 
St.. .Amherst, Mass. 

tr8-l.5 

WANTED 



THE DINOSAURS 
ARE COMING 

Tickets for New Kngland Dinosaur 
Koston's avant garde dance company 
will go on sale July 2».Aug. h on the! 
(oncourse Level of the t .( . from 
H;:Mt-2:«o p.m. Tickets mav also be 
purchased from »-.'; at the Arts Kx 
tension .Service. Draper Hall Annex 
.i4.>- 201.1. 

7-1»5 & K-l 



BELL'S 



% 



a HOUSE 



SHORT OF MONEY??? 

GET A GREAT PIZZA AT A BUDGET PRICE 

Pizza & Hot Oven Grinders 

Open: Weekdays, 10a.m. 1 a.m. 

Weekends, 10a.m. 2a.m. 

65 University Drive, Amherst 



CALL 256-8011/253-0051 



I want to huy your sick or ailing car. any 
make, any model, any problem, foreign or 
domestic. Call Bob. 253-7241. for fast $tt. 
^ n 

.Attractive openminded females for 
modeling and gogo dancing, part time, 
good pay. Write, give full details, phone. P. 
( . Box 212, Knfield. Ct. 

IfRl 

BICYCLES 



Need cycling info? Repairs, rentals, 
sales of all modern bicycles. Peloton, 1 
Kast Pleasant St.. Amherst Carriage 
Shops. 

tf8-l.-> 

FOR SALE 

12" speakers. Sansui reverb. Panasonic 
lass. deck, two tuners; PriK'tor toaster, 
(all llari. ."iKt :iW7. p.ms. 

HI&K 

litfiT Cougar, p.s.. p.b.. air conditioning. 
s(eiro. HO.IMMl miles. ni'« tires, snows, (all 
.l;uk al .'il.tlKlll days. .'>l!)-IHI<l nights. 

X-1 



EXPERIENCED MANAGER 
WANTED 

Full time employment starting mid 
August. Ketailing. buying, display, 
etc. Apply Kmporium India, Carriage 
Shops, .\mherst. 

If 8-8 



LOST 



lost - I Mass ID. No. r.»«287li. 
Michigan license, soc. s 'C. card, (all .1 
Mcllale. i.W-fiSSO evenings. 

HI 



HELP WANTED 



Desk ( ierk— full or part time, starting 
around Aug. 17 thru school year, .\pply in 
person. Howard .lohnson's .Motor Lodge 
iladley. 

K-I&N 



RIDER WANTED 



Offering ride to Washington. D.C. on tith 
or 7th of August in return for help with 
driving. Returning llth or 12th. H2K-:WK;t. 
keep trying. 

H-l 




THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pa«« S 




UMass amateur photographers John Carriere and Jack O'Neil were 
recently at the Manufacturer's Championship of Makes and snapped 
these shots. Left: Mario Andretti (John Carriere photo). Right: Afuro 
Mezario, alsoa co-driver of the Andretti car (Jack O'Neilphoto). 



• other events this week 



Rand scholarship set 



By JACKIE BLOUNT 
The final Bicentennial Discussion 
Hour will present Dr. Sidney 
Kaplan, distinguishecJ professor of 
English. Professor Kaplan has 
devoted many years to the in- 
vestigation of American history. He 
believes that bicentennial programs 
should celebrate people and events 
in American History that have been 
forgotten or distorted — something 
the programs rarely accomplish. 
Professor Kaplan will discuss 
several Black figures who were 
historically significant in Western 
Massachusetts during the 18th 
century. One such figure was 
Elizabeth Freeman of Stockbridge 
who, in the 1780's, initiated a case 
which eliminated slavery in Massa- 
chusetts. The League of Giliad, a 

Scuba course 

Continuing Education is offering 
an intensive summer Scuba course 
Aug. 5- Aug. 17, M-F evenings 
and Saturdays. The course fee is 
$60 for 36 hours instruction and 
NAUI certification. 

The course will emphasize 
medical aspects of diving and diver 
rescue. To register, go to Hick's 
Pool, Mon., Aug. 5 at 7:00 "ready 
to swim." For further information 
contact Room 920 of the Campus 
Center or call 5-2591. 



Springfield group in the early 
1850's, organized themselves to 
forcefully resist the execution of the 
Fugitive Slave Act. Moses Sash 
was a lieutenant under Captain 
Daniel Shea during the famous 
Shea's Rebellion. 

This most interesting informal 
discussion will ba held today at 3 
p.m. in the Student Union Colonial 
Loungp. 

The climax of the film series will 
be the presentation of "Klute," 
starring Jane Fonda and Donald 
Sutherland. This movie skillfully 
combines romance and suspense in 
a documentary-style setting. Bree 
Daniels (Fonda) is a high-priced call 
girl being hunted by a killer. 
Detective Klute (Sutherland) has 
the task of discovering who the 
killer is — before he completes his 
mission. The ending is predictable, 
but it is presented in a novel, ex- 
citing manner. This film should not 
be missed. It will be shown in the 
Campus Center Auditorium on 



Tuesday, August 6 at 8 p.m. Ad- 
mission is free. 

"Narrow Road to the Deep 
North" will be presented August 8 
through August 10. 

Sumathy Kaushal will be the 
featured artist in the Wednesday, 
August 7 Music Hour. She will 
delight the audience with superb 
choreography of classical and 
popular Indian dance. Several 
styles of dance that may be 
presented are bharat natyam, 
odissi, kuchipudi, and meera 
bhajans. The hour of dance will be 
held from 12 noon to 1 p.m. on the 
Campus Center Concourse. 



A Frank Prentice Rand 
Scholarship for fine arts and drama 
students at the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst has been 
established in memory of the late 
Amherst resident who taught 
English at UMass for 46 years. 

The UMass Class of 1924 has 
presented the University with 
$5,000, the yearly income from 
which will be turned into 
scholarships. During his UMass 
teaching career, which ended in 
1960 when he retired as professor 



emeritus, he spent 23 years as head 
of the English Department. For 
seven years he was dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. In 1920 he 
was faculty manager of non- 
athletic campus activities, including 
dramatics, and in that role con- 
sented to allow women mem- 
bership in the student dramatic 
society. 

Dr. Rand was a pioneer in the use 
of audio-visual aids, and author of 
17 volumes, including poetry, plays, 
and a history of the Town of 
Amherst. 



An insurance policy was 
taken out against the live 
capture and delivery in 
London of the Loch Ness 
monster. 



'Your new Hodaka Dealer" 




McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte. 9) 
Hadley, 584-2277 

CYCLE REPAIRS 
All Makes & Models 
Parts & Accessories 



^^V&t%-<^t{ 




Dealer 
offering 
'Motorcycle Pick-Up Service' 



Closest Bike 
Shop to 
U. Mass 





GARY A. PRESENTS 

The New Riders 
of the Purple Sage 



and 



[gETTTo THE PQSr OFFICE >- iN AMHEH5T. 



Commander Cody 

and his 
Lost Planet Airmen 



Springfield Civic Center 

Springfield, Mass. 
Sat., August 17, 1974 
8:00 p.m. 



Tickets: $5.50 

Ticke'is Available at all Ticketron Outlets 
AMHERST SPRINGFIELD 

Fred Locke Stereo 
Neptune Waterbeus 



Faces of Earth 



Paqe 6 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY. AUGUST 1. 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1?74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«lf7 



Harrington raps high court on busing decision 



U.S. Rep. Michael J. Harrington 
(D Mass.) has expressed his 
disappointment with the Supreri^^ 
Court's ruling against metropolitan 
busing. 

Harrington said "the Court's 
decision seems to be indicative of a 
less broad-minded stance than 
allowed for the monumental 
desegregation rulings during the 
last two decades." Harrington 
commented that the decision was 
especially unfortunate in light of the 
lack of initiative by the Congress 
and states to press ahead with 
integration. 



"Though the advances made in 
the last 20 years have been 
significant," Harrington said, "we 
cannot afford to become lax in our 
efforts. We are still far away from 
achieving a non-discriminatory, 
integrated society and have not yet 
erased the effects of past 
discrimination." Harrington voiced 
his concern that by ruling against 
metropolitan busing, the Supreme 
Court was limiting the number of 
effective tools which can possibly 
achieve integration. 

Harrington described the Court 
decision as a serious setback to 



advocates of integration. He noted, 
however, that the 5-4 ruling was 
not based on a majority decision, 
thereby leaving open the possibility 
that given different circumstances 
metropolitan busing might be 
considered acceptable to the court. 

He specifically mentioned the 
option of consolidating school 
districts, as was recently ordered in 
Louisville, Kentucky, as "opposed to 
busing across autonomous school 
districts. 

Metropolitan busing has been 
viewed by some of its supporters as 
being the only means of 



Crafty Dinosaur' conning 



By GAIL BERGER 

What's Dinosaur? 

I've seen it, you've seen it, but 
what's it really all about? 

Well, the answer is forth- 
coming... Dinosaur, otherwise 
known as New England Dinosaur, is 
Boston's own avant-garde, modern 
dance company. But don't be 
content with just knowing what the 
name ^/nosat/r signifies ... The real 
question is ... what does Dinosaur 
do? 

Acclaimed by the critics as "...a 
crafty and wonderful creature" and 

Art therapy 

Ten one-day workshops on art 
therapy will be offered this summer 
as part of the 1974 Summer Arts 
Institute here from August 5 
through 16. 

Led by Peller Marion, a registered 
art therapist and doctoral candidate 
at the University, the workshops 
are for students, social workers, 
nurses, corrections officers, 
teachers and others who are in- 
terested in imploying art therapy 
techniques in their work. 

Further information and 
registration forms are available 
from Arts Extension Service, 
Division of Continuing Education, 
Hills House North, University of 
Massachusetts, telephone 545- 
2013. 





"first class mixed bag", New 
England Dinosaur is one of the 
most fascinating companies ever to 
strike Western Massachusetts. One 
dance, for example, is based on 
referees' signals at a football game. 
One performance will guarantee 
falling helplessly in love with the 
company. 

"Well what are they doing here?" 
you might ask. As a community 
outreach service for Amherst and 
surrounding communities, the Arts 
Extension and Academic Services 
of Continuing Education have 
captured Dinosaur for a one week 
residency on campus from August^ 
5 through August 9. Dinosaur's 
dance programs in the past have 
included drums, speaking, shouting 
in three different languages, traffic, 
Mozart and Joplin. During the week 
of August 5, Dinosaur will hold an 
adult Master class, an evening of 
dance at Bowker, a Children's 
performance, and a Children's 
Mastei class. 
Adult Master Class 

Monday, August 5, 1:00 p.m., 
dance studio in the North Physical 
Education Building. Technique and 
discussion on choreography. 
Tickets $2.50. 
Evening Performance 

Thursday, August 8, 8:00 p.m., 
Bowker Auditorium "Port de Bras 
for Referees", "Classic Tango", 
"Solo", and a world premier, 
"Trio". Tickets: Adults $2.50, 



Children $1.50. Groups of 20 or 
more may take a $.50 discount. 
Children's Performance 

Wednesday, August 7, 10:00 
a.m.. Orchard Hill Residential 
Colivjge, U. Mass. A splendid 
workshop and preparation tor 
children who wish to dance in 
"Interlope". Ages: 7 to 12, Limit: 30 
children. Tickets: $2.50. 

Tickets will be sold daily on the 
Campus Center Concourse level 
between the hours of 11:30 and 
2:00 p.m., or you may drop in at 
Draper Hall Annex. 

MHERSTCHINESEFOOD 

62 Main St., Amherst 
Tel. 253-7835 
EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT 
Lunch Specials 99c & up 



desegregating cities with 
predominantly minority 
populations. Harrington suggested 
his agreement with this stance and 
said, "The simple fact of the matter 
is that cities like Detroit are so 
racially and economically im- 
balanced as to preclude integration. 
Often, without some association 
with suburban schools, cities 
cannot receive or have access tr> 
funds and facilities they so 
desperately need." 

He also made mention of the 
relevance of metropolitan busing as 
a possible solution to court-ordered 
Boston desegregation. Referring to 
recent statements by Mr. John 
Kerrigan of the Boston School 
Committee, Harrington stressed 
that the Boston suburbs "have 
been negligent in placing the 



burden of integration only on the 
cities and refusing to accept any 
direct action." 

Harrington criticized what he 
described as "an attempt to ignore 
racial problems by isolating them 
through the creation of artificial 
boundaries. Too often, districting 
' has been determined by con- 
siderations of whom it is 'desirable' 
to exclude." 

"Metropolitan busing has the 
potential of ensuring that we ad- 
dress the city problems of race and 
education instead of trying to run 
away from them to suburban 
havens," Harrington concluded. 
"My concern is that we asume a 
metropolitan and statewide 
responsibility for those who cannot 
so easily escape." 



XI 



2[{9 



BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of- 
fering a bulk rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two-sided 
copies* (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Vz cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copying onto one side only, add % cent per copy. 



. . For the second straight 
week, graduate student 
Charlie O'Dowd has won a 
free beer from the Solstice 
editors for correctly 
identifying the mystery 
photo. Last week's mystery 
person was rocket scientist 
Werner von Braun. 

Well. ..here's another 
tough one folks. As usual, 
the first person to correctly 
identify the mystery photo 
to the editors in room 422 of 
the Student Union wins a 
free beer. 



mm 



For people 
who walk 
the earth . 




Earth 




Shoes, Sandals, Sabots 
and Boots for AAen & Women 
from $23.50 - $42.50 
Brochure Available 




264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413) 256-8911 

14 Story St. 
Brattle Arcade 
Cambridge, Mass 02138 
(617) 492-6000 



Our Soft Cloq 

U.S. Patent No. 3305947 



Amherst Hours: 
10-5:30, Mon.-Sat., 



11-7 p.m., Fri. 



EVER PERFORM BEFORE 25,000 

PEOPLE??? HERE'S YOUR CHANCE!! 

yOur photos and articles can appear 
in the back to school collegian 



WRITERS 



1) Fpalnrc ■rticin (or pull-out •irr(ion§. 

2) K-isays. artirlPH. short fiction, poetry, etc. on campun or arra 
rrlalpd (opirs ( i.e. roommates, dining rommuns. rourf.r reRislration 
(to(he<i. etc*. Must be enterUining and informative. 

:ii ( onlart Jerry l^iar. Z.S3-2I40. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



1 1 Black & while prints oframpu* or area related subjecti any siie. 

2> (olor photo for cover. 10" x IS". 

.1) ( onlacl Steve RurkIm for details, M.V07I6. 



DEADLINE IS AUGUST 12 

PUBLICATION DATES: SEPTEMBER 3-4 



' i ' ■ • ' »' ^ - ' T ' ' i' < MinHH'i'i * . 



Timely Summer buys, 
our all week specials 
on frozen foods. 

Save on luscious Stop & Shop Ice Cream, 
on tangy lemonade, on frozen entrees and 
other good foods designed to cut your time 
in the kitchen on sizzling summer days. We 
planned these values with you and your 
budget in mind. 

Stop & Shop 1/2 Gal. 
Ice Cream ^a^o^^QQC 

ASSORTED FLAVORS ^W 

Ice Cream Sandwiches 

HENDRIE'S — 12C0UNT — 360Z.PKG. QQC 

Ice Cream Cups 99<^ 

HENDRIE'S — 1 2 COUNT — 36 oz. PKG. 

Sundae Cups 99<^ 



Snow Crop 
Orange Juice 







FLORIDA ORANGE JUICE 



Birds Eye 
Spinach 



CHOPPED 
OR LEAF 










2 lb. Freezer 
Queen Entrees 



Beef Patties with Mushrooms, 
Beet Patties with Onions, 
Veal Parmigian, Sliced 
Turkey or Salisbury Steak. 



89 



ea. 



Cookin' Bag 
Banquet Meats 



Veal Parmigian, Cream 
Chipped Beef, Sliced Tur- 
key, Sliced Beef, Chicken 
ala King or Meat Loaf 



4r ^1 
Pkgs. ^1 



stop & Shop 
Lemonade 




Birds Eye 
Tasti-Fries 




Shoestring Potatoes 69<= 

SLIM JIM BRAND — 40 02 BAG 

Hawaiian Punch 5 ca°ns 99« 
Haddock Fillets *'^^ 

OR FLOUNDER FILLETS 



Lenders Bagels 



''%r''39c 



ONION PLAIN OR EGG 



O SEA 99' 



Egg Beaters 
Jenos PACK Pizza 



FLEISCHMANN S TOC 
12 02 PACKAGE f *J 

24 02 Pkg 89^ 



French Green Beans SpVgV^ 

FAIRLANE BRAND 

Baby Lima Beans T^''^ 27^ 



Macaroni & Cheese 39^ 




•Published weekly by Stop & Shop. 




III! 



Consumerc^uuu 

A Ihtle ^weekly iiap^tiiat talks 

€or thought. Pick it up 

atStop&Shofi. 





Ill 





»•• ^^^^^^ 



III 



All'iveek dairy specials! 

Flavored Yogurt 

STOP & SHOP 6 FLAVORS ^ eoz ^^ 
Get your Slop & Shopsworth ^ c^ps^ J. 

Breakstone Temptee ,.ZT.Le%:i 49^ 



Ballard Biscuits 



8 802 $1 
Phgs ' 



Sour Cream 49® 

BREAKSTONE — 16 oz. CUP 

Caljack Cheese Sticks l^l 69= 

Borden Lite Line cH^EiiPF'o'oD p.? 99"= 

(inod bii vs /r«mi tmr hakrry! 

English MufSins 

39c 



STOP & SHOP — 1 1 oz PKG of 6 
CINNAMON-RAISIN. BACON FLA- 
VORED OR BLUEBERRY FLAVORED 

Buttermilk Bread stop « shop 3C°a%,^1 
Stop & Shop Lemon Pie VVg' 69= 
Newfangled Muffins stop & shop 79<= 

16 02. BLUEBERRY OP 14V2 oz. ORANGE 

SSt White Bread 

BUTTERTOP SLICED ^L^oavesSJ. 

Daisy ^%^ir Donuts 'VV 53= 

PLAIN OR CINNAMON — PACKAGE OF 6 , 

Chocolate o'Bu.t.r.cotch Brownies ^p^g' 65= 

STOP & SHOP BRAND 

Stop & Stop Louisiana Ring V'k? 69= 

Miui-prired' savings o»i 
lu'iilth & beauty aidsl 



Breck Shampoo 




20 02. BOTTLE 
BONUS PACK 



$129 

Dial Deodorant 

8 02. AEROSOL CAN y Q^ 

Mini-prlced.' I W 

Sliced fresh to order in our 
Service Deli Shop! 

AVAILABLE IN STORES WITH A SERVICE OELI. 

Deutchmacher 
Bologna ' 59® 

GERMAN STYLE 

Deutchmacher Liverwurst 



QERMAN STYLE 



,1? 59= 



Deutchmacher Salami °|^T ib 59= 



"" 59= 



lb. 



White American Cheese 

Almar Cooked Corned Beef ^"XS^" 

Meats for a great breakfast 
with these all iveek values. 

Ham Slices 

CRYOVAC PACKAGE ^«|iO 
COLONIAL BRAND ^A^^i" 

Sliced Canadian Bacon °lZpil"*V' 
Brown N'Serve Sausage^to' pKT^g' 

FROZEN 

Tenderloin Stealcs 

«3M 




lb. 

12 02 ggc 

»119 



Pkg. 



"QUALITY-PROTECTED" BEEF 

(FILET MIGNON) 

Jimmy Dean Sausage 

Pork Sausage Links counTRYFiNE »i 

Merit Sliced 
Bacon < 'b. ^-ackaqe 99^ 

Colonial Sliced Bacon JdS *1°« 

Jones Sausage Links frozen },ll 



1 lb. 
Pkg. 
lib. $-139 




We're out to inform. To help. To maybe cause a smile every now and 
again. And if we sell a pound of fish along the way. good. Sell the fish 
the store; tell you in CONSUMERISMS how to poach it, serve it, 
love it. Take a look at the back page and the fist full of coupons for 
your next week's shopping. We have a column called Buy Lines with 
inside information on what to buy and 'why We have interesting 
and sometime elegant recipes from the Stop & Shop Cooking 
,j^ School. We're going to print your letters every now and 

' *'.^JP'-5''' again. And always, every week, there'll be an easy-to- 
" "^ ' read, informative article on how a supermarket works. 
This means we're going to talk food ; food prices, food 
distribution, food availability. You can pick up your 
copy of CONSUIVIERISIVIS at the checkout 
counters in more than 1 56 Stop & Shop 
stores from New Hampshire to New Jersey. 
Clip the coupons. Laugh a little. Learn a lot. 



/^. 



Karen Hayes 
Director of Consumer Affairs 
The Stop & Shop Companies Inc 



J 



64 4 99 



A great huy^ tender and juicy U.S. Grade '''A 




10 to 22 lbs.— a size 
for every family. 

Plump and tender with more than enough 
juicy, flavorful white and dark meat to 
satisfy your family. When the turkeys are 
this good and the mini-price* is this special, 
you're getting your Stop & Shopsworth! 




''Quality -Protected'' Beef Naturally Aged! 



SINGLE 
CUT 



^^^EreshBeefi 

Brisket 99t. 



Plan a meal around a delicious ham! 

lb. Canned Ham 




STOP & SHOP 

Before we put our name on 
the outside, we make sure 
there's fine ham inside . . . 
lean from end to end, moist 
and delicious. Try one this 
week. 




First of the season from California! 

Bartlett Ptears S 79' 

Rushed to your Stop & Shop Garden of Eatin for sweet eating. ^^^ W W^ 

Fresh, Green Peppers -^ p' -' 29f 



iiamt et"*r*d for ••!• not Availabia >n ctM iot» 




Starts Monday, July 29 - Saturday. Aug. 3 




nree! 



WITH THIS COUPON 
AND A $5 PURCHASE 

STOP & SHOP 

PLASTIC 
WRAP 






1CX) FOOT ROLL 

Limit one roll per customer 
Good Mon July 29-Sat August 3 



(H'l'nOOOOOOJuOihiuOiKH 



l$<! 



**Prove It 
To Yourself" 

We think our own Stop & Shop brands 
are equally as good as the big national 
brands. So we're offering you a "Prove 
It To Yourself" Coupon so you can try 
our brands. See if you don't agree. We 
think you'll find them every bit as good 
as most of the big name brands. In fact, 
we guarantee it. Try it. We think you'll 
like it. 

Self Service DelicateBten 

ifi$S Cold Cuts 

SLICED — P ft P. BOLO.. <• S ot JL AC 
OLIVE OR POLISH STYLE LOAF ^ P^B* ^^^ 

Imported Sliced Ham 99* 

STOP & SHOP — 8 oz. PACKAGE 



From our Summer Kitchen! 

Delicious White Gem 

Cooked Chickens 

FULLY COOKED Pf AA 

ROASTED OR BARBECUE STYLE / T^iT 

Family Size Chicken Pies 'Ut *"•*' 
Submarine Sandwich "*r,i.'=p'i'Q"' 69= 
Parfaits - Assorted Flavors 



13 Of ^Qc 
Cool. ^^ 



AVAILABLE IN STORES WITH A SERVICE DELI. 

STOP & SHOP "QUALITY-PROTECTED" 

Roast Beef ?^ 89<^ 

Grapenut or Plain Custard ^' 69= 
Macaroni & Beef Deiicioust 7^' 79^ 

Reel in all-week »at)ing$! 

Haddock Fmcts $li? 



FROZEN 



39 



Halibut Steaks ^«o2in ^' *^ 

Peeled & Deveined Shrimp '?.«" »3" 
Cooked Haddock Fillets T^IJ! M" 



TASTE 
OSEA 

OR FLOUNDER FILLETS — 1 LB. PKQ. 



All Stop Sl Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience, 



*^r 



P»9«« 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST }. 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 9 



The Cuban Exposition 






Photos by Ed Cohon 






Tfw^ 



s- i^- 





Cuban exposition a big success 



The July 26th committee - 
Western Massachusetts hosted a 
three day festival on Cuba and Chile 
over the weekend at the Springfield 
College Black Cultural center. The 
July 26th committee was initiated 
by.this area's branch of the national 
organization, The Venceremos 
Brigade. Since 1969, The Ven- 
ceremos Brigade has sent over 
2,000 young people from the United 
States to work in Cuba in the cane 
fields, citrus groves and housing 
developments under construction. 
Set up for the single purpose of 
organizing "Expo- Cuba-Chile: Two 



// 



Frame up to 
be siiown 



A first showing of the film, 
"FRAME-UP, The IM- 

PRISONMENT OF MARTIN 
SOSTRE" by the Pacific Street 
Film Collective will be shown 
Tuesday, August 6th in the Campus 
Center Auditorium following the 
film "Klute". 

Amnesty International, a 
prestigious world-wide organization 
for the defense of political 
prisor>ers, which has consuKing^ 
status with the U.N. and is a 
member of UNfSCO, is backing 
Martin Sostre s plea for justice. A 
spokesman for Amnesty In- 
ternational recently stated "We. 
have become convinced that 
Martin Sostre has been a victim of a 
miscarriage of justice because of 
his political beliefs." 

Martin Sostre is a political 
prisoner and has been incarcerated ' 
since 1967. 

His crime, supporters say, was 
serving his community the ghetto in 
Buffalo known as Cold Springs. 
There he ran a bookstore offering 
the people of Cold Springs a place 
to come together, and discuss ideas 
and books, a place to study and it is 
for this "crime" alone-offering 
alternatives to drugs and ghetto 
conditions that Martin Sostre 
suffered police harassment and was 
subsequently framed by the Buffalo 
police as they staged a heroin sale 
by walking in and out of Martin 
Sostre's bookstore. 

Despite perjured testimony from 
two trial witnesses Martin Sostre 
remains in prison. Despite the fact 
that $100,000 worth of heroin has 
disappeared from the Buffalo Police 
Department's narcotics locker- 
Martin Sostre is in prison. 



races of Latin America," the 
committee acquired support and 
participation of other organizations 
and individuals in Springfield, 
Holyoke, Northampton, and 
Amherst. 

In 15 cities and communities 
across the United States, Cuba- 
Chile expositions were held. In 
Chicago and New York (the New 
York event ocurred in Avery Fisher 
Hall, Lincoln Center, before a 
crowd of 2,000 people) the keynote 
speaker was Beatriz Ailende, 
daughter of martyred Chilean 
president, Salvador Ailende. Her 
trip to the U.S. broke the precedent 
of state department denial of a visa 
to anyone holding a Cuban 
passport. Endorsement of Ms. 
Allende's request for a visa came 
from over 20 members of the U.S. 
Congress, including Michael 
Harrington of Massachusetts, Bella 
Abzug of New York and Ron 
Dellums of California. 

The July 26th committee takes 
its name from the date in 1953 
when the Cuban patriots assaulted 
the Moncada barracks of the 



dictator Fulgencio Batista, in the 
first armed attack of the Cuban 
revolution. July 26th is now an 
internationally celebrated Cuban 
holiday, and it has come to sym- 
bolize Latin American struggle 
against U.S. domination. 

"Expo-Cuba-Chile: Two Faces of 
Latin America" presented a multi- 
media view of contrasts: Cuba ih its 
construction of a socialist society 
where health care, artistic 
development and grass-roots 
democracy flourish; and Chile, 
under a grim fascist dictatorship 
which has eliminated health care 
for the workers and peasants, 
suppressed populai culture, and 
sent tens of thousands of dedicated 
Chilean patriots to their deaths, 
torture chambers and con- 
centration camps. Expo Cuba-Chile 
was thus both a celebration of the 
Latin American future and a protest 
of the worst of its contemporary 
realities. 

A major focus of the Springfield 
Expo was the largest photographic 
exhibit on contemporary Cuba ever 
displayed in the United States. The 



three days of activities also in- 
cluded silk screen poster, films and 
music of Cuba. A special feature of 
the expo was a display of Cuban 
sports equipment. Area residents 
who are returned volunteers from 
this spring's Venceremos Brigade 
shared their experiences in a panel 
on Sunday afternoon. Robert Cole, 
an economist at University of 
Massachusetts discussed the 
political economy of Cuba, drav.ing 
on his recent visit to the island. 

Friday and Saturday's programs 
focused on Chile. Andrew Zim- 
balist, a member of the Chile Action 
Group detailed the role of the U.S. 
government and corporations in the 
September 11th coup and the on 
going state of seige in Chile. Robert 
Stein, a city Planner from Stanford 
Conn, presented slides on Chile 
taken before and during the Ailende 
years. And Laura Ross, a member 
of a Trade Union delegation of 
inquiry to Chile, described the 
situation since the institution of 
military rule. 

"Expo-Cuba-Chile: Two Faces of 
Latin America" offered an un- 



precedented opportunity for 
visitors to judge for themselves the 
achievements of the Cuban p>eople 
and the facts behind fascism in 
Chile. Over the coming year, the 
Western Massachusetts regional of 
the Veneremos Brigade will con- 
tinue to pre^nt educational events; 
and in the fall, it will begin 
recruitment for the 8th contingent 
of the Brigade to Cuba in the 
Spring. 



Readers Read Carefully 

The Newspaper Advertis- 
ing Bureau reports that a 
survey of 1,720 men and 
women, ages 18 and over, 
shows that almost nine out of 
ten adults who read one or 
more daily newspapers dur- 
ing a five-day span read them 
thoroughly. 

The Bureau says that the 
typical reader sets aside a 
certain time each day for 
reading the paper and be- 
comes involved by clipping 
news items or advertisements. 



FOR THE 


REST ^ 




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OF YOUR 


LIFE ' 

9 




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TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION 




Olfi 

WEIM 

HAROIM 



15-20 minutes twice daily provides rest 
deeper than in deep sleep ! 

Expands awareness 
— Provides basis for dynamic action 
— Can be learned easily & enjoyed by everyone 

FREE PUBLIC LECTURE 

Thursday, August 1, 7:30 p.m. 

Machmer W-26 



FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 549-6708 



New Location: 
65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 

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• in town 

^Used jeans, denim jackets, leather jackets, western 
shirts, much more ... 

New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 

PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

253-5291 

Open Monday-Saturday, 10-6 
Friday Nite, till 9 



WEEKEND SPECIAL 





Thur.. 8/1/74 

One 
Coupon 
Per Pizza 



Fri. 8/2/74 
One 



Sl50 
I for a small plain pizza 

SS"" for eaoh additional item. 



Call 256-8587 ■ 



OUR CHEESE 
STANDS ALONE 

And i. di 1 I, \(>fK^. •"w*hfoom\.gre«np»pp»n,tomof>J 

lowtr and oif*» -ngredieni* at Dom.no \ P'tto 

Btcous* ov-f P'lia .figrlKl'pols o-# rttUvrftd fresh 

fv»f V dOv to lui shop* ^^on^ a t«nlral <omm,i%of y Noth-ng \ 

tw 'ro?en And b*<;ou*e ** P'om'***©'* *'« 

d»l.w*'V fw*i>otly within 30'T>.nu*»>\l y0wcanb«4wr« •' Ilb«h0f 

and goOȴ Dofnn^ \ ^''I/o AnyftoMq #lw '1 i*f o'.d bf*' 

Ttw DemlM Ptopk or» pluo fMopI*, ^rlod. 

H DOMINO'S 
PIZZA 

Call 256-8587 



^^ 



$|00 Qpp 

ON ANY LARSE PIZZA 



Call 256-8587 I 
I 




ISat. 8/3//4 

lune 
! Coupon 
! Per Pizza 



2 FREE Pepsis 

■ (upon request) 

with the order of any size pizza. 



Call 256-8587 | 




Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 _ 



Cesar Chaves visits West. Mass. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1?74 



Four years ago the United Farm- 
workers (AFL-CIO) negotiated their 
first contracts with the 
management of California 
agricultural corporations. Those 
contracts were a major 
breakthrough for the workers trying 
to overcome the oppression of the 
growers who employ them. 
Nevertheless, the struggle con- 
tinues, workers still live in sub- 
standard housing, are poisoned by 
improper use of pesticides, and die 
at a rate three times that of the 
national average. Workers' children 



are still forced to work in the fields 
because of the low wages paid to 
the laborers. Labor contractors 
continue to exploit those they do 
the "service" of hiring by deducting 
up to 22 per cent of the workers' 
pay for that service and by 
providing housing, transportation, 
food and tools at inflated prices for 
workers who are not allowed into 
town to shop for themselves, often 
because they are of Mexican and 
not Anglo heritage. 

The United Farmworkers' Union, 
the unanimous choice of the 



A narrative 



Finding America 

By STEPHEN COAN 
As I'm sitting here writing this entry into this journal, I'm saddened by 
the fact that this will be the last one that anyone will ever enter into it. 

We left our home a fog shrouded part of southeastern Mass., the dav 
after Christmas which was six months ago yesterday to look for America. 
There were 12 of us who embarked upon this journey, Larry, Carol, Ray, 
Jerri, Geroge, Robin, Alex, Nancy, Peter, Ann, Joy and myself Stills. 

I still can remember that cold December day; the snow was just 
beginning to fall and someone shouted"lets go to Florida" and the next 
thing we knew was that Key West would be our first stop on our way to 
see America. 

Now that I look back on our journey to Florida, it was pretty hilarious 
even though at ihe time we didn't think so. Joy and I hitching to Richmond 
to buy a wattrptimp for our van which broke down in Petersburg, Va. in 
the middle of a snowstorm while Larry and Carol built a snowman at the 
side of the road. Or when Alex was arrested in Savannah for speeding and 
if it wasn't for Nancy'j father who wired her the bail money, Alex would 
probably be rottitig away in that jail today. 

While driving throuth Fiesta Key we met two prople who over the last six 
months have greatly influenced our lives. Victoire and Alfredo. They were 
hitching back to their commune in Key West , ghold estate, when we 
picked them up on US 1. They instantly befriended us and insisted we stay 
with them at least until we found jobs and a place to live. 

When we arriced at their commune we were welcomed with open arms 
by Al, Mary, Ralph, Pricilla, Howie, Leslie, Joe, and Joann who were the 
other members of the commune. Peter and Ann explained to them we 
were from a small town and that we wanted to see what the rest of the 
country was like before we fell into the same rut that everyone did at 
home. 

They told us we were welcome to stay with them as long as we wanted 
and that they hoped we would make this our new home. It was a 
unanimous vote and we then became members of one large family. 

Everyone at the commune worked during the day. Our fishing ex- 
periences from back home payed off since the guys in the commune 
owned a shrimp boat. The girls, on the other hand, joined the rest of the 
girls selling flowers on street corners to natives and tourists alike. 

All of us couldn't believe it. Here we were in Florida having the time of 
our life. Even though we worked hard during the day we actually enjoyed it 
since for the first time in our lives we were doing something we liked. 

Larry, Peter, George, Carol, Ann, Joy and myself formed a group and 
Mary's friend helped us start out by letting us play at his bar anytime we 
wanted. 

Within a month or so our fame had spread throughout Key West and a 
representative from one of the major companies wanted us to cut a record, 
but we enjoyed our playing too much to ever seriously consider his offer. 

Still I can remember Joy saying one night when we were lying in bed, 
"I'm so happy here. I wish that we could stay here forever," and I began 
thinking to myself maybe what were doing in Key West is what America is 
all about. People working and playing together doing what they want to 
instead of having someone else run their lives for them. 

Wait a minute. There's that siren again, what's going on here? 



workers, is organizing workers in an 
effort to overcome the racist 
discrimination that has resulted in 
their lower social status. Workers, 
through strikes, and consumers, 
through boycotts of stores carrying 
non-union produce have been able 
to win contracts and thereby 
dignity. 

Cesar Chavez, the President of 
the United Farmworkers' Union, 
the first successful agricultural 
workers union of any size ever 
organized, will be visiting Western 
Mass. this weekend, August 4 and 



Burned up about scorch- 
ed clothing? You needn't be 
if you heed this hint. Rub 
scorches with a piece of raw 
onion and leave them for a 
while. Then soak them in 
cold water. The marks fade. 



5. Action planned around his visit 
includes a Mass Picket Line at the 
Pathmark Store on Boston Road in 
Springfield, at 4:00 on Aug. 5, 
followed by a supporters dinner and 
then, at 8:30, a Mass Rally at 
Cathedral High School Auditorium. 



260 Surrey Road, Springfield. 
All individuals who are interested 
the United Farmworkers, 



in 



organized farm labor, or have 
questions about it are urged to 
attend the rally at Cathedral. 



Gallo lawn party Sat. 
for Mosakowski 




Kenneth Mosakowski of 
Amherst, a candidate for the 
Democratic nomination for 
Congress, will be the honored guest 
at a lawn party this Saturday at 7 
p.m., to be held at the home of 
Ernest and Nadine Gallo, Moody 
Bridge Rd., Hadley. 

The gathering will mark the kick- 
off of Mosakowski's campaign for 
votes in the September 10th 
primary election. 

The 27-year-old Democrat is 
expected to announce key 
positions in his campaign 
organization during the course of 
the evening. 

The public is cordially invited to 
meet and talk with the candidate at 
the informal gathering. 



Mosakowski recently expressed 
strong support for an amendment 
by Congressmen John Flynt of 
Georgia and Robert Giaimo of 
Conn, to cut military aid to South 
Vietnam to $750 million, about half 
the amount requested by the 
administration. 

"If this amendment passes," 
Mosakowski said, "it will be a major 
step toward cutting off all 
American military spending for the 
fascist Thieu dictatorship." 

The Flynt-Giaimo marks the first 
attempt in the House of 
Representatives to cut aid to 
Saigon substantially below one 
billion dollars. 

The vote is expected to come on 
the House floor next week. 



Northampton 
V.W. ® 

STATION WAGON 
SPECIALS 



1971 Olds Vista Cruiser, V 8, 
auto., p.s., p.b., air. CO^QC 

1970 Pontiac Bonneville, V 8, 
auto., p.s., p.b. $1895 

1970 Dodge Coronet, V 8, 
auto., p.s., p.b. $1295 

1967 Ford Squire, V-8, auto., 

p s , p b 5JQ95 

246 King St. 
Northampton 

584-8620 



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'^I'VWVl'VWW 



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offering a 
summer of 

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U KI).\f:sD.\Y - SI NDAY. Featuring 

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Happy Hour Daily 4-6 p.m. 
all drinks only 49"" 

Entertainment Sunday & 
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Luncheons Daily 11:30-3:00 

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» a ■■ ■ mm »u 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 11 



Hair premiering at U.Mass 



By JACK/E BLOUNT 
During its Broadway run. Hair 
was one of the most popular, most 
talked-about, and most con- 
troversial stage musicals since 
"Hello Dolly" and "Fiddler on the 
Roof." 

One of the innovations of Hair is 
that it has no plot. Instead, it 
substitutes a vision of time and 
place, a vision of restless, defiant 
youth revolution prevelant 
throughout the United States and 
Europe in the late 1960's. One well 
remembers these years of peace 
marches, anti-war posters and 
banners, draft-card burnings, and 
campus crises. 

This tirbal-rock interpretation of 
these times is merely a number of 
incidences in the lives of members 
of a hippie tribe. Nothing happens, 
yet everything happens. It has been 
described as "one great 'hap- 
pening' In which. . .rebellious 
youngsters. . .rip into the uptight 
standards and moralities of their 
elders." The rebellion depicted on 
stage, along with the challenge to 




Bob D'Elia (Burger), Jayne Valbona (Sheila) and 
Larry Jainchill (Claude) in CMT's Production of 
"Hair." 



standard morality explains why Hair 
was temporarily banned in several 
cities in its early years. 

In countless American cities from 
1968 to 1974, Hair became 
synonymous with "counterculture" 
and a major force in setting and 
illustrating the lifestyle of anti- 
establishment youth. Just as there 
is little plot in Hair, there are few of 
what could be called leading roles. 
Most of the songs are group-songs, 
programmed as being sung by "X 
and Company." 

Hair will be presented in four 8 
p.m. performances from Wed- 
nesday, July 31 through Saturday, 
August 3 Student tickets are $2.00, 
all others, $3.00. All seats may be 
reserved. Tickets may be purchased 
in the Student Activities Office 
(Student Union Balcony) or at the 
Bowker box office before each 
performance. 

^The Paper Housed 



en 
en 

CO 



65 UNIVERSITY DRIVE 



tBAc r 



OPEN •• 
MonTri 10-9 
Sect 10-6 



dso visit 

oup ftecoprf 
^ > Room 



^ 



'ROUTI 9- H^DLE/ 



casual cjualify clolhing 
fair prices aod 

IHe friend iest 

of service... 



Kids' , 
ftolball 
jerseys 



Gertflernaa 

shifts 

Q^sorfcol 
hptlter teps 



Landlubber 
deaim 

Cloagos 



/ 



breaKaway 
taps ' 



Oemlb 
la Kld^'.f 



Levi s 

corduroy 
or denim 

bellboftoms 



\Aa^ 



1)uriham "trulClfers 



X 



'^ 



Trye 
boots 



« « 



"g;:;,-, t 



Page 12 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY. AUGUST 1. 1»74 




First O' th0 Fnth Produce 

California 
' Iceberg 

j?>i7^ -Lettuce "" 

Plums 

Cantaloupe ea59^ 



Chuck 



Laroda 
Cherrystone 



A Good Source 
of Vitamin A & C ' 

Large 27 Size 



Limes or 




Ground Chuck 

99! 



Freshly Ground 

Many Times 

Daily 



Lomons **»^ 



Barbecue 

Special! 

Tender Juicy Chuck 

London Broil IS^'S^.. 
Cube Steak "?rr . . . 
Shoulder Roast Boo«>ess 
Rib Steaks ^i:'^'^. . . . 
Blade Steak Bon.te«. . . 
Rib Roast ^mUSi 



More Flnatt Valumt 

Finast 
Sliced Bacon 



1.69 
1.69 
1.49 
1.49 
1.59 
1.49 



Center Cut - Chuck 

Steak or Roast 




Bone 
In 



77 



Semi- 1 



It Pays 

to Shop 

the Finast 

Way 

Sliced Bacon 
BolOQna n.g^r^*B«»i 




Frosh Chicken Parts 

Chicken Legs 

Fresh ^^ ^%C 

Meaty 0%fl^ 

Drumsticks c<:'T,. ^ 79* 

Chicken Breast b 89* 

Breasts IS^ ml .49 

Mr Deli Favorites 

Boiled Ham 

Imported ^CSQ 

I Freshly Sliced ^^^ 

to Order I ib 

American Cheese ib 1.29 

Kahn's LiverwurstAc. . .b 99* 

Mr Deli Bologna ib 1.29 

MrDeli Hard Rolls.. dS^n 79* 

Available in Stores with Serve* Deli* 

International Seafood! 
Flounder Fillet 'pS?^. . . ,b 69* 

Jumbo Smelts t 59* 

Dressed Whiting * 49* 

Heat A Serve Specials 

Haddock '-SSl^ * 1.19 

Fish Stlcks't:° 'n.19 




Finast will no longer Increase the price of food 
OTKe placed on our shelves. 
Effective on Wednesday. July 24, 1974 all Finast 
SuperniarKets began a new pricing policy on Gro- 
cery. Meat arxj Produce items. 



HNAST BREAKS TRADITION IN FOOD PRICING 



shelves will be sold at the old lower price. 

When these items are restocked on the shelves. 
tf>e new. high priced itenDs will be placed twhind 
the lower priced items. 



When Finast is forced to make a price increase, Weekly speciais or "sale items" are priced lower 
cans arxJ packages already price marked on the than regular prices, any remaining after the sale 



event will be repriced upwards 

As regular prices go down. Finast will inrv 
mediately reduce the price on shelf stock, and the 
lower price will always be honored at the 
register. When a can or package shows more 
than orw price, the customer pays the lowest 
price for tfurt can or package. 



Baked goods, baby food, fair trade, and items 
controlled by state laws are exempt from this 

r>ew policy. 

Until current stocks are sold there will be some 
items of our many thousands with nxire than one 
price marking on the can or package. Please bear 
with us during this transition. 



Frozen Food Values 



Hostess Whip 

Topping 



A Real 
Value 



29ozOAi 
ctns^^^y 



Orange Juice r,n.s, 4 ^n', 84' 

From our Beer A Wine Shop! 

Schlitz Beer 



6 Pack 



6120Z 4 45 
cans I 




Calero Rose 

Wine Imported 
from Argentina 



SpareTime 

Frozen Beef. 

Chicken, Turkey 



1 liter 



2 



99 




One 18 oz jar 

Planters 
Peanut Butter 



With A Pufchate o« J5 or More 

Si imit Onr Coupon per Customer 
M4 71 ValK) thru Auq 3 1974 



Ice Cream 

Richmond All Flavors 



With 

This f^a" 

Coupon gallon 



69 



i— I And A Purchase of S5 00 or More 

g4L9ltt Lirriit One Coupon 



H460 Valid thru Aug 3, 1974 



lmf>erial 
All Purpose 



Pot Pies 



Libby's Catchup 
Blended Oil 
Butter "to^"' 
Tomatoes 

^P| ■■^^ Van Camp 
I UlKl Grated 

Saltines 
Tomatoes 



76 oz^ 
pKgs ■ 



414 0Z ^^ 
btis I 



32 oz 
ctn 



1 Ib 
pkg 



Richmond 
Whole 



6'/4 oz 
can 



Roberts 
Crisp Fresh 



89^" 
69^ 

4.eo.H 
cans H 

38 <^ 

3 ,.$4 
pkgs I 



Save 20^11 Save25 



\«lli TtMs Coupon 
One Ibcan 



I 



\«lh Thu Coupon 
One 9 01 can 



Sure 



Maxwell House I 

Coffee I 

' — ' Valid ihri 

vflimaav 14409 Sb\ . Aug J « ^^^n^^^^ rM/B :>ai . i^ug j i 



Super 

Deodorant 

4190 



trfjm ^ vahd thru i fiUM @ 

Vltttlill hl409 Sal Aug 3 I lUlimf H478 Sal Aug 3 



Save lO^H Save 40 



With This Coupon 
One S Ib Dag 

Pillsbury 
Best Flour 



Wilh This Coupon 
One 8 oi lar 



I 

I Sanka 

I Decaf Inst Coffee 



H^^J 



[Mj I 

' — Ivalid thru , 
H40e Sat Aug 3 j 



(^^9 



Im] 

' — I Valid thru 
H410Sat Aug 3 




Save 10 



t^Ih This Coupon 
Or>e 16 02 bowl 



With This Coupon ' 

One 16 oi pkg I 

Keebler Town | 
House Crackers | 

, fSS* IMn's^t'^^ug 3 I I^^J H4 12 Sat Aug 3 



Blue Bonnet 
Margarine 

I — I valid thru 



Save 30'H Save 10 



With This Coupon 
One 64 o; bll 



With This Coupon 
One 8 CI pkg 



Coconut nuSoft j Glad Heavy Duty 
Fabric Softener | Trash Bags 

naajif^v-idthru \t9uma^ 

, UMiUf H4t3 Sal Aug ] I 



|||Q^9 



valK) Ihtu 
H414Sat Aug 3 



Finast 
Stewed 



416 oz $4 
cans ■ 




We Reserve irie Right lo Ltmtl Quantities 



SUPERMARKETS 

Prices In this Ad Etiective thru Sat . Aug 3 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



For the week of August 3 Through 
August 9 21" 

By Stella Wilder 

Negative impulses from celestial 
activities outnumber the positive 
many times over throughout the 
coming week. As a result, the wise 
earthling will make every effort to 
relax, roll with the punches and 
ultimately, adapt and adjust to 
prevailing situations and cir- 
cumstances. There is much to 
recommend optimism during this 
week of events which could 
otherwise cause you to become 
rapidly discouraged, for optimism 
will enable you to meet whatever 
hardships or disappointments you 
must with the kind of for- 
wardlooking attitude, necessary to 
wrest good from ill, success from 
failure, strength from sorrow. 

An abundance of planetary 
interaction Is reflected in the almost 
frantic give and take that is bound 
to go on between and among any 
who attempt in any way whatever 
to establish personal relationships 
— whether such relationships be 
those of enemies or those of 
friends. It is vital to all interested in 
ironing out disturbed conditions at 
home and at work that attention be 
paid to those elements of 
dissension which have lately arisen 
to complicate matters. To ignore 
these is to court a disastrous future. 
-F + + 

LEO (July 23-Aug.7) - Projects 
already underway will respond to 
efforts to improve methods of 
operation. Bring your production 
techniques up to date quickly. 
(Aug. 8-Aug. 22) Avoid beginning 
any new phase of your career or 
indulging any new interest where a 
hobby is concerned. Keep to the 
things you know well and enjoy. 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 13 



Your weekly stars 



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7) - 
Though another's proposition may 
look good, you would do well to 
shelve your interest in it for the 
time being. Ask for a rain check. 
(Sept. 8-Sept. 22) - When and if 
you are presented with an offer 
both new and gainful, don't move 
too quickly. Talk things over with 
mature family members. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.7( - 
Though you may not be able to 
avoid making one or two important 
decisions early in the week, make 
every effort to avoid acting on 
them. (Oct. 8-Oct. 22) - There will 
be plenty of time to change your 
mind — if you are wise enough not 
to enter into action as soon as you 
are given the green light. Wait! 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - 
Hasty decisions could lead to hasty 
actions — of the kind that will 
insure failure rather than success. 
Keep calm when faced with 
choices. (Nov. 8-Nov. 21) — 
Though it may appear that op- 
portunities beckon from every 
corner, you would do well to ignore 
any offers for gain until this week is 
through. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 7) 
— If you've plenty of energy in 
reserve, this could be a good week 
for you — but you will have to 
stretch a point to make it so. (Dec. 
8-Dec. 21) — Though the week is 
full of activities, you may find 
yourself wondering how to pass the 
time. Do what you can to interest 
another in your career. 

CAPRICORN {Dec. 22-Jan. 5) - 
Strictly business: that is the way to 



approach all your dealings with 
people this week. Avoid entering 
into money deals with friends. (Jan. 
6 - Jan. 19) — Ochers may attempt 
to move you in directions you 
would prefer not to go. Exert your 
strength of character and all should 
go well at last. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3) - If 
you look in the obvious places, you 
will hardly find what you're looking 
for. Take a lead from a child's book 
late in the week. (Feb. 4-Feb. 18) — 
Advantages com3 upon this week 
would be better kept to yourself for 
the time being. Friends and foes 
alike may try to prv secrets out of 
you. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - 
The wise Pisces will set aside a 
matter of business in the interest of 



another's more pressing problems. 
Young people yield a clue to gain. 
(March 6-March 20) - Be patient 
with those who try to run your life 
for you this week. The need to lead, 
direct, maneuver.sor just plain boss 
is very real. 

ARIES (March 21 -April 4) - 
Allow friends as much freedom as 
they need if and when they attempt 
to help you make gains this week. 
The times may not be easy. (April 5 
- April 19) — If you Insist upon 
doing the work of your head to the 
exclusion of the feelings of your 
heart, you may do yourself and 
your work more harm than good. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - 
Minor difficulties arising from 
property settlements could easily 
develop into major ones by week's 



end. Redirect your energies. (May 
6-May 20) — there is no real need 
to consult a disinterested third 
party regarding present in- 
decisiveness. Consult your con- 
science for the right answer. 

G£M//V/(May21-June6) - Seta 
good example for younger family 
members. Make sure that your 
promises are kept. If your word is 
your bond, all should go well (June 
7-June 20) — .Let your actions 
speak for you at this time. Others 
may not have to prove themselves, 
but you would be wise to do so 
now. Adapt to a new situation. 

CANCER (June 21 -July 7) - 
Business interest may be pursued 
this week — but don't expect to 
make the kinds of gains that in- 
vested time and money would 
indicate. (July 8-July 22) — Make 
no decisions on the assumption 
that there is to be an increase in 
available family funds. Schedule 
activities according to present 



Paid the /RS? 



The Internal Revenue Service 
advised today that many individual 
taxpayers in Massachusetts have 
been notified that their 1972 income 
tax return (Form 1040) has not been 
received for processing. 

District Director of Internal 
Revenue Service John E. Foristall 
said that in the IRS' notification, 
taxpayers are asked to reply by 
filling out the computer notice and 
mailing it in the envelope provided, 
to the Internal Revenue Service 
Center, 310 Lowell Street, Andover, 
Mass. 

The IRS has a special computer 
program which identifies taxpayers 
whose Form 1040 should have been 
filed by April 16, 1973. 

"Taxpayers who filed within the 
last four weeks and used the name 
and identifying number on the 
notice, may disregard the notice," 
Foristall said. 



Notices will also be sent to 
taxpayers in a few months whose 
1973 Form 1040 has not been 
received. 

IRS is also sending many notices 
to business firms advising them 
that quarterly withholding taxes 
due April 30 and other taxes, have 
not been received. 




CUT- # ■ 

Summer 

Entertainment 
Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
& Sat. 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 
Sp§eM 

SUNDAY, MONDAY & 
TUESDAY *^ii» 

Includes Salad Bar ^^»* 

€IJT» # ■ 



Corner University Drive and 
Route 9 



The Texas Instruments 
SR-IO electronic calculator: 
timely value if you value your time 



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••« •«k4ai**-*«« ••• • 't- 



Pag* 14 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, W4 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 15 



IM results; league standings 



University of 

Massachusetts 

1974 Summer 

Intramural Activities 

Cross Country 

Race Results 

Men's Division 
[1.7 Miles] 

Name Pas... Name 

Ken Boyd 1 8:12.5 

Bob French 2 8:25.8 

Bill Elliott 3 8:49.0 

John Cooke 4 8:50.0 

Charles Moran 5 8:54.1 

John Stifler 6 9:08.0 

Jeff Langhorn 7 10:28.5 

Bill Kiendzion 8 11:01.0 

Edward McQuaid 9 11 -.20.5 

Barry French 10 12:31.0 

Robby French 11 12:31.0 

Seth Moran 12 13:22.6 



Women 's Division 
[ 7 Mile] 

Name Pos. . . . Time 

Leslie Ludtke 1 7:00.9 

Mollis Wheeler 2 726.5 

Mary Fil 3 8:19.8 

Ruth Morse 4 8:34.0 

Claire Frierson 5 9:42.8 



University of 
Massachusetts 
1974 Summer Intramurals 
Swim Meet 
50 Yard Freestyle 
Men Time . Place 

D. Donovan 28.7 1 

Keith Baptist 39.0 ^ 

Women Time . Place 

Blair Rice 34.0 1 

Sharon Greenberg 41 .5 2 

Betty Fil 44.5 3 



50 Yard Backstroke 



Men 

Dan Donovan 
Glenn Conway 
Pete Greenberg 
Women 
Blair Rice 
Sharon Greenberg 
Betty Fil 



Time. Place 

33.5 1 
41.0 2 

42.6 3 
Time. Place 
48.2 1 
54.8 2 
56.0 3 



50 Yard 
Breaststroke 



Men 
T. Weil 

Glenn Conway 
J. Parker 
Pete Greenberg 
Women 
Blair Rice 
Sharon Greenberg 



Time . Place 
35.9 1 
41.7 2 
42.1 3 

45.4 4 
Time . Place 

46.5 1 
1:04.1 2 



100 Yard Freestyle 

Men Time . Place 

T.Weil 1:00.6 1 

Women Time. Place 

(no entries) 



700 Yard 
Novelty Relay 
*Men Time.f^ace 

Parker, Prizzio, 

Donovan, Weil 1 

Women Time . Place 

(no entries) 



200 Medley Relay 
Men Time . Place 

D. Donovan, T. Weil, 
J. Parker, J. Prizzio 2:20.8 1 
Women Time . Place 

(no entries) 



250 Yard Co-Rec 
Freestyle Relay 
Men Time . Place 

Jeannie Abrahamson 1 

Tom Stone 
Blair Rice 
J. Prizzio 
J. Parker 

Women Time . Place 

Betty Fil 

Sharon Greenberg 
T. Weil 
D. Donovan 
P. Greenberg 



50 Yard Butterfly 

Men Time . Place 

P. Greenberg 35.8 1 

Glenn Conway 37.0 2 

Women Time . Place 
Jeannie Abrahamson 1 

Blair Rice 2 



University of 

Massachusetts 

1974 Summer Intramural 

Activities 

League Standings 

as of 7-26-74 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Sissies 



Worms 

Plumbers 

Pipefitters 

Univ. Store 

Watergate 9 

Ashcan 

Coins 

Dead End Kids 

Bods 

Astoglia 



6-0 
5-1 
5-1 
3-3 
2-3-1 
2-3 
2-3 
2-4 
1-4-1 
1-5 
0-2 
29-29-2 



Diving 
J. f^izzio — 1st Place 

Front Pike - 474, 5'/^, 5 - 1.2 
degree of difficulty equals 18.0 

Front Layout - 5, 5J4. 6 - 1.6 
degree of difficulty equals 26.4. 

Front Pike - 6, 6, 6 — 1 .2 degree 
of difficulty equals 21.6 — Total 
Points — 66.0. 

Keith Baptist - 2nd Place 

Front Pike - 4, 5, 4 '/^ - 1.1 
degree of difficulty equals 16.2. 

Front Yi Tuck - 4'A, 4'/i, 5 - 
1.6 degree of difficultv equals 22.4. 

Front Layout — 3'/?, 4, 4 — 1.6 
degree of difficulty equals 18.4 — 
Total Points - 57.0 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Education 
Over the hill 
Oceans 
DD214 

Franks Flunkies 
Blue Wall 
Six Hundred 
Psychology 
Selohssa 
Immorril 



6-0 
5-1 
4-2 
4-2 
3-3 
1-4t 
2-4 
2-4 
.1-5 

1-4t 
29-29 



Co-Rec Softball 




Immorrill 


6^ 


Rowdy 


4-2 


Patriots 


2-3 


Misfits 


3-2 


Sops 


1-2 


F Stops 


0-4 


Liberation 


0-4 




16-17t 


tDouble forfeit - Sops 


vs. F 


Stops - 7-9-74 




Uo-fiec Volleyball 




The BourKi 


61 


Bound Upward 


52 


Genesis 


15 


Webster 


15 


Men's Volleyball 




Final Standings 




Gunners 


6-0 


African 


3-3 


Genesis 


2-4 


Painters 


1-5 


■* 


12-12 


IM notice 





tTie pending! 



Individual sports participants 
must report their games as soon as 
possible. Unreported games will go 
as forfeits. Playoffs will be 
scheduled this week. If you are in 
the playoffs report to the IM office 
lO check opponents. 



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Music Inn concert: unique yet automatic 



By PAXTON J. CONGO III 
Last Saturday's Music Inn 
Concert was special and unique. It 
was the first time I've experienced a 
vendor walking through the crowd 
hawking hot dogs and peanuts at a 
rock concert. , 
Not that it should have surprised 



They got $ $ 



The Alumnae Fund of Smith 
College reached a record high in the 
history of the College in the year 
1973-74. A total of $1,900,767 was 
contributed by 14,266 alumnae, or 
46 percent of all Smith alumnae. 

Organized in 1912 as part of the 
Alumnae Association, the Alumnae 
Fund's primary purpose is to 
conduct the annual giving program 
for unrestricted gifts. Since 1965- 
66, the Alumnae Fund has raised 
over one million dollars each year. It 
is among the largest of the annual 
giving programs of other women's 
colleges. 

The chairman of the Fund this 
year was Mrs. Richard H. Lange of 
Schenectady, New York. Mrs. 
Lange was a graduate of the class 
of 1947. 



me. Music Inn has all the con- 
veniences; a primitive wilderness 
with hot dog stands. The promoters 
of these concerts have taken the 
Berkshire backdrop and sup- 
plemented it with fruit stands, 
vendors, and a bar and dance hall. 

Not that I should be offended by 
the marketing of the Woodstock 
nation (in fairness, that's the 
American way, and there have been 
worse examples), but much of the 
music was as automatic as the ring 
on a cash register. 

Three names headlined the bill 
that began in mid-afternoon: Leon 
Redbone, John Prine and David 
Bromberg. I must inform the 
reader; had I not enjoyed the 
performers before the concert, I 
never would have gone in the first 
place. My bias aside, Mr. Redbone 
performed the urban blues to a 
suburban audience as well as 
anyone. If his performance was 
short (less than 40 minutes), I 
excused him because he was out of 
his element. Mr. Redbones music 
and style were personal and in- 
timate, a mood difficult to capture 
in the middle of a field surrounded 
by 5,000 people. (That 5,000 figure 
is a guess. No one at the ticket 
office was able to figure out the 
gate before I departed). 



Mr. Bromberg's updated 
bluegrass followed Mr. Redbone, 
but before I speak of the Bromberg 
act, the audience deserves a word 
of comment. I always wondered 
what would happen when the 
quaalude, sopers, and reds dried 
up; now I know. For every four 
people there was an average of one 
half- gallon of wine. The crowd was 
distinguished by the proliferation of 
stocked coolers. If the beverage of 
Lenox bluegrass is wine and hard 
liquor, then contrast that with the 
beer freaks at more typical 
bluegrass festivals. In any event, by 
the time the Bromberg group hit 
the stage the crowd had been 
hitting the bottle for several hours. 
That has got to be why Mr. 
Bromberg's lackluster set was met 
by so much cheer. The Bromberg 
group stumbled through their first 
few numbers, characterized by 
miscues and often off key. I 
breathed relief when they left tha 
stage, for both our agonies were 
over. 

Mr. Prine's music was that of an 
existential cynic; things are bad, but 
who the heck cares? He echoed the 
distrust and disillusionment of the 
Vietnam generation without bit- 
terness, but resiqnation. The sad 



irony of the lyrics weren't at all 
depressing, because Mr. Prine 
played the part of the rogue and 
had the audience laughing at the 
ridiculous. It was effective and 
entertaining. 

The finale where Prine and the 
Bromberg group jammed together 
was somehow anti-climatic. Many 
in the crowd left before the encore, 
and more walked out during the 
performance. That was too bad, 
because both Prine and Bromberg 



I 



were at ease in the ad lib format, 
and those that left early missed 
some fine music. 

The only resolve that I can offer 
for this column is in the comment I 
made earlier: much of the concert 
seemed automatic. Until tne finale, 
the audience ran through their 
applause just as the performers ran 
through their numbers. Why? 
Some say audiences are becoming 
•nore sophisticated, some say it's 
tiie age and the alcohol. I just say 
it's the Republicans. 



,inniiigir r m ' r » ( n i ' ri ' iriimiitii » t ' iiiitii r% 

SUMMER IN 
AMHERST? 

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Fri. 5:30p.m.-ll :00p.m. i 

Sat. 5:00 p.m.-ll :00 p.m. 

Sun. 4:00p.m.-10:00p.m. 



James Taylor 



(Continued from P. 16) 

PHAEDRA— Tangerine Dream 
(Virgin VR 13-108) time 36:14 

It's called 'inner arrogance', and 
it's a completely assured self- 
confidence that makes you believe 
fully that you will be the dominant 
force in winning. Reggie Jackson 
has it. This one starts, bluffs, but 
doesn't go. 



You really can tell how these 
germs do in the realm of their 
electronic music by their name. 
TANGERINE DREAM by Phaedra 
okay, buy PHAEDRA by Tangerine 
Dream, r;o way. There is about ten 
minutes of very nice stuff on here. 

A 'far out for Moody Blues fans' 
C-. 



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Today — 2:00-5:15-8:00 
Twi-Lite Hr. — 4:45-5:15 



(Continued from P. 16) 

polished leather shoes, with 
matching socks, three pair of grey 
double knit slacks, three gray short 
sleeve shirts, with three grey and 
black polkadot ties to break the 
continual sea of grey— filled with 
three short haired straight looking 
dudes who were either there 
checking out the attendance to 
THEIR concert, or just getting off 
work with no time to change for 
fear of missing some introductory 
notes from the musicians. 

Whatever— they had a good time 
like everyone else. 

But a discriminating ear would 
have noted the 'processed' sounds 
coming from the band. Admittedly, 
they sounded like their records, but 
in a live concert, especially staged 
with the wonders of nature to 
compete with, that extra rush 
comes from good jamming, timing, 
and enthusiasm. And unfortunately 



there must have been a premium on 
those qualities because they 
weren't funning repant. 

And two hours of music during 
the 8-10 hour stay didn't really fill 
those hungry musical cavities; but 
nobody complained. Besides, the 
music was just part of the total 
experience — laughing rapping, 
partying and being— with friends, 
on a beautiful day on lush green 
grass (not the concrete city folks 
are used to ) surrounded by tall 
green trees— and digging the whole 
scene. A dynamite day. 



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14 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1974 



Editorials 




Reviews 



While impeaching the emperor 



By Zamir Nestelbaum 
"The chair recognizes the 
buffoon from New Jersey, Mr. 
Flinstone, Uh....l mean Mr. Sand- 
man." 

"Thank you Mr. Chairman for 
recognizing me. Now as you know, 
the motion before us, that of im- 
peaching the Emporer for exposing 
himself in front of the Macy's 
Thanksgiving Day Parade in 
November of 1973, is totally 
without basis, there exists no 
substantial evidence, that the 
Emporer, as those on the other side 
of the aisle would have us believe. 



was striding down Fifth Avenue in 
the buff. 

"The convincing point 
being, in fact, as the Emporer's 
Taylor Clifford Girving has testified 
before this Committee, that the 
Emporer had on his new set of 
clothes, that Girving had just made 
up for him. We have in our 39 
volumes of testimony, every one of 
the Emporer's Aides on record as 
having seen the clothes, and 
even rather admiring them. It was a 
concrete bill of goods that the 
Emporer bought from Mr. Girving 
and not the imaginary kind that 



some infer. Inferences! Thats all 
they are!!!" 

"The buffoon has expired all of 
his time. The Chair now recognizes 
that loyal subject from 
Massachusetts, Mr. Donohue," 

ZZZZzzzz. . . . zzzz. . . . zzzz" 

The gentleman's to time is 
expired, the Chair now recognizes 
the chimpanzee from California, 
Mr. Cheetah, Uh!.,.l mean Mr. 
Wiggins." 

"Why thank you Mr. Chairman 
for your attention. This is 
ridiculous! Why every piece of 
evidence against the Emporer for 



Notes from tlie undergrad 



Dionysus '74 



By E PATRICK M 

I recall my first encounter with Dionysus. It was in 
the early spring of 195—; Hemingway and I had 
rented a small villa just south of Pamplona near San 
Sabastian. I had made a commitment to meet Camus 
in Paris a week later and so took my departure im- 
mediately after running with the bulls. In a small field 
outside of Madrid my Facel-Vega broke down and it 
was there, while waiting for assistance that I met the 
man who has changed my life entirely. 

In the conversations that occurred that day, 
Dionysus revealed some of the most astounding 
philosophical statements that I feel I must record for 
all posterity; or at least until the cleaning woman 
discovers them. 

Our story begins along the banks of the Tigris- 
Euphrades when Europe was a vast wasteland. The 
first documented reports of man's imbibing in alcohol 
are to be found in thp wrltinas of the little-known, 
ancient Greek philosopher, Delirius Tremenus. The 
discovery was carried to Rome by Dino Matrinius and 
further to Gaul and Saxony. 

The first known incident of "malicious con- 
sumption" was that of one Mario Manga. During the 
15th century, this young Italian rebel terrorized the 
countryside by night. Having stuffed himself to near 
explosion he would gallop across the marshes, 
screaming between bottles and mouthfuls, "Long live 
the open mouth!" 

The arrival of liquor in England was welcomed with 
open arms. Upon tasting his first Bloody Mary, Henry 
VIII, the then reigning magistrate is quoted as saying: 
"Foresooth, me thinks the stuff is good!" 



Several years later, a starving artist, (it was quite 
the vogue thing to be) named Giles Gibblet, while 
studying at Eaton University, leaped to the podium 
during graduation exercises; pushed his professor 
aside and exclaimed, "Damn morality! Give me 
ink!" He was immediately suspended (from the coffee 
shop ceiling) and blacklisted in every pub on the 
British Isles. 

Meanwhile on the continent, progress was flowing 
at an amazing rate in France. Monsiour Pierre Souse 
had by the turn of the 17th century perfected the wine 
press. 

It is extremely unfortunate that centuries later this 
grand pastime would be interrupted by the studies of 
one Professor N. E. Briate of UMass-Amherst. While 
conducting experiments on grad student, Tank 
Rumhound, he discovered the dangers of excessive 
indulgence. His findings were verified by Dr. Wassil 
Grog and his associate Dipsus Barflie. 

It is with such knowledge behind them that the 
devotees of Bacchus still thrive here at UMass. The 
Great Imbibers of Nectar (GIN) have promoted 
corruption and perversion here to an inspiring degree. 

The free spirit of Dionysus lives; it is eternal. 
Positive negation and opposing infinities; accepting 
and revolting; ambition, torture, happiness. Dionysus 
is the grasping of the beyond within; the total 
existence stretching across a pit of brief encounter. 

There is no place for Dionysus today. He is here, the 
eternal necessity to create and destroy from within, 
but he is hidden under the guise of bureaucracy and 
institution. And so, what is left but to lie and wait in 
silence? 



nudity is absurd. It is entirely cir- 
cumstantial. Just because on little 
boy, and a know troublemaker at 
the University Day School at that, 
screamed out: "THE EMPORER 
HAS NO CLOTHES!!!" is ther any 
reason to believe he was telling the 
truth. A.'.d just because some 
people saw the Emporer dive into a 
nearby Morgan Memorial Box 
immediately after, is no reason to 
carry out this charge. Why those 
people were blind to the Truth, as I 
think any reasonable American 
would concur. The Emporer had a 
beautiful set of clothes. 

"All the evidence against him is 
an inference. Just because his 
clothes were totally see-through 
doesn't mean they weren't there. 
As my good friend Mr. Humgate so 
aptly pointed out, that just because 
we see an elephant, thats not 
necessarily what it is. I could be a 
mouse with a glandular con- 
dition!...." 

"Th Chimp's time has expired, 
the Chair now recognizes 
the bumpkin from Missouri, Mr. 
Humgate." 

"Thank ya kindly Mr. Chairman, 



Ya know, this remines me of an ole 
Missoura story 'bout the difference 
between an epileptic corn husker, 
and a prostitute with diahrea. Why 
the diffrence by bein, as any 'poke 
from Missoura will tell yia, is that the 
epileptic corn husker shucks 
between fits, and the Uh, 
prositiute...." 

"The gentleman's time is ex- 
pired. The Chair recognizes the 
nerd sitting to my left, Mr. Hut- 
chinson." 

"Thank you Mr. Chairman, I 
submit, and any level headed 
person would agree, that the 
Emporer was in fact a member of 
the National Olympic Streaking 
Team, and was trying to get it a 
little exposure. Would you convict a 
man trying to raise a little good 
American cash for such a worthy 
cause? I think not. I yield the 
balance of my time." 

"Th Chair now recognizes that 
great Congressman from 
Massachusetts, for the final 
argument on this matter. Mr. 
Donohue..." 

!zzzzzzzz. 



Solstice doesn't 
understand Guru 



Caustic Comments 



To the Editor: 

Your coverage of the recent 
festival held by the disciples of Guru 
Maharaj Ji demonstrated a com- 
plete lack of understanding of 
Maharaj Ji and his spiritual 
knowledge. 

There is an old proverb that 
states when a pick- pocket meets a 
saint all he sees are his pockets. 
Isn't it a direct reflection of the 
individual's consciousness that all 
he could pick up were appeals for 
money and a melange of inane 
analogies about cars and other ' 
equipment? Cleariy the devotees 
experienced a completely different 
event than that reported in your 
newspaper. 

It's obviously not the sun's fault 

that a blind man can't see its light. 

Similarly your reporters who didn't 

have appropriate vision missed the 

entire event we call Guru Puja '74. 



In essence Guru Maharaj J i offers 
a meditation called "Knowledge". 
This meditation is not hypnosis; it is 
not autosuggestion — jt is not a 
philosophy or belief. 

Nor is the meditation a capricious 
or random prayer. Knowledge is an 
EXPERIENCE, it is a direct ex- 
perience of the natural basis of life 
itself. Initiates close their eyes, cut 
off the external senses and focus 
their consciousness on four basic 
phenomena which are continually 
transpiring within each of us. 
Maharaj Ji shows us how to 
concretely see and experience Inner 
Light. Not a symbolic light or 
"feeling" of clarity, but an actual 
light that can be seen, beautiful 
beyond imagination, which soothes 
away the accumulated tensions of 
body and mind. 

Henry Reil 



Fogging horns, souping strings hurt Taylor 



By MIKE KOSTEK 

HEART STRINGS Linda Lewis 
(Reprise MS 2192) time 36:30 

A strange pleasure indeed. Ms. 
Lewis seductively warbles (more 
than anyone else I can think of, 
Linda really does warble) through a 
healthy 3 or 4 octave vocal ran(.«. 
(most folks have two at most) with 
ease and a special grace that 
dances on the naive side. 

A sweet collection, with five 
excellent tracks culled from her two 
other Ips. 

A spulful, rocking B. 



FANTASTIC FEDORA Duke 
Williams & The Extremes 
(Capricorn CP 0133) time 43:39 

Now this is good. A successful 
blend of Philly Soul, J. Geils style. 
Fat's ankle-busting power and 
verve and healthy touches of 
Allman Brothers guitar and Georgia 
country blues. 

There are touches in each song 
that are the result of excellent 
recording work, and make almost 
every tune memorable, with 
"Sometimes", "God Bless All The 
Girls In The World" and "Thene 



From The Planet Eros" standing 
out. Great bar music: fine lead and 
harmony singing, exciting, charging 
arrangements and crisp playing. 
Don't overwork this stuff -taken in 
proper moderation, you' II find a 
wonderton of solid music. 

An apprecdelete 

WALKING MAN James Taylor 
(Warners W 2794) time 33:34 

Well-defined is James Taylor's 
current condition, pin pointed by 
Mr. Taylor himself. As a walking 
man, James is calm, aloof, 
reasoned (for the most part). 



America's music: no gripes 



By Deborah Nikkei 
There was the snap and woosh 
of beer cans, the pop and the 
gushing of champagne, and nimble 
rolling and exhilirated smoking of 
marijuana cigarettes. ..salami, 
cheese, french bread, wacks of 
watermelon, rows of nectarines, 
and boxes of popsicles curbed 
munchy appetites. 

Parents brought their children, 
children brought their parents, but 
mostly teenage folks and middle 
age folks brought themselves, and 
provisions to enjoy the late af- 
ternoon outdoor corKert at Music 
Irm, Lenox, featuring the rock 



yroup 'America . 

There was initial disappointment 
when scheduled first act Wendy 
Waldman canceled out. But the 
young MS. who womaned the 
loudspeaker promised an extra long 
set from 'America', who'd be on 
immediately." 

Twenty minutes later, about 
three hours after the first enthusiast 
stormed the front gate (in semi- 
orderly fashion) 'America' came 
out, just as most of the audience 
was really coming on. 

As the sun beat a steady path 
down to the already bronzed bodies 
sprawled on the grasa, 'America' 



beat a steady rhythm that rocked 
the birds, the bees, and maybe even 
the trees. 

And it certainly rocked the 
crowd: one husky woman anri her 
equally husky man were moved to 
boogeying dead center in the field; 
while others were too far gone to 
really move to the sounds — like the 
young man with tremendous 
protruding red eyes, who could 
only groan at the crescendos. 

And what's this: in the middle of 
the long haired, overalled, 
leathered, jeaned, and shoeless 
crowd sat three pairs of black 
< ConiMMicd o« P. IS) 



conventional (there are only so 
many way to walk, and have they 
all not been walked already?) and 
(must he not be) pedantic. A bit 
much of these sessions concerns 
James, his dog, his guitar, his 
garden, et al. Occasionally a most 
pleasant lilt will accompany these 
unimportant tidings, and James 
sings very well throughout, but just 
as occasionally, fogging horns a id 
souping strings inside Muzak Age 
arrangements come in to tide away 
whatever good feeling he's built up. 

A fading away C. 

SEFRONIA Tim Buckley 
(Discreet MS 2157) time 37:55 

All those who have been waiting 
for Mr. Buckley to wrap his for- 
midible pipes around songs like 
Fred Neil's Dolphins", Tom Waits' 
"Martha" and the Traditional 
"Sally Go Round The Roses" (says 
on the label that Tim wrote it, but I 
think not) will not be disappointed. 
Things do get slow in a couple of 
slow slogging blues, but all in all, 
Tim blasts away into his non pareil 
wailing emotion enough to take this 
one honie, 

A falls apart in everything but the 
win column' B. 

KWANZA Archie Shepp (Im- 
pulse AS-9262) time 41:49 

Strictly commercial. These 1969 
outtakes feature famous n£.mes 
(Laon Thomas, Joa Chambers, 



Dave Burrell, Beaver Harris), but 
they labor in mostly dull 
surroundings. We've heard the 
"Spoo Pee Doo" Leon Thomas 
before, as well as the funk-drag 
"Back Back". "New Africa" has its 
moments, mostly in Shepp's Sun 
Ra roots, as does "Slow Drag", but 
not enough. Only "Bakai" holds 
this one up from teetering off. 

Archie's reportedly not on 
ABC — Impulse anymore, and this 
seems like a mere cashbox effort. 

A living in the past C. 
(Cominued on V. IS) 

Kneeland nuts 

To the Editor; 

Would Mike Kneeland please 
expose his football credential to the 
public to verify "Pats in Super Bowl 
Shape." 

Steve Smith 
Dear Steve; 

As the first paragraph of my 
article stated, the Patriots are a 
good bet for the Super Bowl only if 
the players' strike never ends. 
When the strike ends, I predict the 
Patriots will finish behind Miami 
and Buffalo in their division. 

My only credentials are a big foot 
and a bigger mouth. 

MK 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 8 




recyclable 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1974 



A new framework 



Hopes high for women's studies 



by Mike Kneeland 

The coordinator for the newly 
established Women's Studies 
Program is expected to be an- 
nounced next week by the 
Provost's Office. 

Program leaders stres"> that the 
coordinator will not be a head of 
the flexible program, which has 
been formulating for more than 
three years. 

Despite a small operating budget, 
organizers expect the program to 
be a success. 

Ariene Ryan, a graduate student 
working with the program, said the 
support from the administration "is 
not overwhelming." With their 
allocated $18,000, she said, all 
expenses of the program must be 
paid. The program, however, will 
employ work-study sudents which 
means they need only pay 20 per 
cent of those salaries. 

The Woman's Studies proposal 
was accepted by the Faculty 
Senate and Board of Trustees last 
spring. 



In a 29- page booklet presented to 
the Academic Matters Council by 
the Women's Studies Sub- 
committee of the Committee on the 
Status of Women, organizers asked 
for the pilot project to last until 1976 
when a full major in Women's 
Studies would be implemented. 

Students who participate in the 
program this fall will be granted a 
certificate in Women's Studies 
"which would be tantamount to 
the recognition of a minor con- 
centration," the proposal said. 

Cindy Deitch, also a graduate 
student working on the Women's 
Studies staff this summer, said one 
immediate value of the program is 
that the students will have a 
decision making voice in the 
program's development. 

Other advantages cited are: 

— the program will stimulate 
interest in current Women's 
Studies offerings in the depart- 
ments. 

— the program will encourage 
the development of new depart- 



mental courses and the in- 
corporation of new information and 
new oersoectives into existing 
course offerings. 

Ryan says a "new framework" 
must be developed in almost every 
academic field. As an example, she 
noted, the housewife in pre- 
industrial times was "vital, ab- 
solutely vital, to survival." 

"When a wife died," she said, 
"the man remarried pretty quickly." 

Students here are already 
majoring in Women's Studies 
through the BDIC program and 
many Women's Studies courses at 
area colleges have reached 
maximum enrollments. 

Developers say, therefore, that 
the new program is not a "new 
deaprture", but will "coordinate 
and give direction to the intense 
interest, the extensive resources, 
and the range of informal programs 
that already exist at the University." 

Requirements for the program 
will be flexible. Each student in the 
program, however, must enroll for 



Shappell set to assume 
graduate school deanship 



Professor Verre Shappell, 
presently the philosophy depart- 
ment's head, will become the 
acting dean of the graduate school 
here Sept. 1. 

He is replacing Professor R. 
Woodbury who has had the 




Photo by Mike Kn««land 

VERRE SHAPPELL 



position in an acting capacity for 
the past year. Woodbury had been 
filling in for Dean Mortimer H. 
Appley who had been studying in 
Europe on a Fulbright Fellowship. 

Appley, while in Germany, was 
selected to become the sixth 
president of Clark University in 
Worcester and assumed that 
position July 1. 

Shappell came to the University 
of Massachusetts three and a half 
years ago as the philosophy 
department head. He did both his 
undergraduate and graduate work 
at Yale where he briefly taught. He 
has taught for 13 years at the 
University of Chicago and had 
visiting appointments at such 
schools as Notre Dame, Smith, 
Indiana and Illinois. 

He said he was surprised when 
he learned of his selection by a 
search committee which only 
considered UMass professors. A 
search for a permanent graduate 
school dean will soon begin. 

Shappell will have the general 
responsibility for all graduate in- 
struction on campus, including the 
coordination of all research. 

The acting dean will be working 
with two associate deans in the 



graduate school: Eugene Pied- 
mond, whose responsibility is 
academic affairs; and Pat 
Camerino, who watches over 
research. 

Shappell said their responsibility 
is nearly equal of that of the dean's 
so there is really "three people 
responsible for various activities of 
the graduate school." 

At this time, Shappell does not 
know if he'll initiate any major 
changes in the graduate school 
although graduate programs 
around the country are being 
systematically reviewed by their 
administrators. There are about 
4,000 graduate students at UMass. 

While Shappell is acting as the 
graduate school dean. Professor 
Robert Sleigh will be the acting 
head of the philosophy department. 
Shappell said he will continue to 
teach one course each semester. 

Shappell says he has a "problem 
oriented approach to philosophy." 
He says that during the past 30 or 
40 years, there has been a more 
scientific approach to philosophy. 

He has written and edited various 
published articles, and says the 
recent trend has not been to write 
books. 



Sarge getting aggrevation 
from his own administration 



ByMARKVOGLER 

The state executive Office of 
Human Services is creating havock 
for Gov. Francis W. Sargent's re- 
election campaign. 

Carroll P. Sheehan, Sargent's 
opposition for the Republican 
primary and his Democratic 
challengers Michael Dukakis and 
Atty. Gen. Robert H. Quinn have 
been critical of the present ad- 
ministration's delivery of human 
services under Secretary Peter 
Goldmark. 

And now reports have been 



circulating around Beacon Hill that 
the controversial cabinet figure has 
considered quitting. 

This week the Solstice was told 
by reliable sources that Sargent had 
rejected Goldmark' s resignation on 
the grounds that it could damage 
the Governor's re-election bid. 

But despite the persisting 
rumors, the Governor's top 
assistant Thomas Riordan has 
denied them. 

"That story is crazy. Secretary 
Goldmark has not offered his 
resignation, and any report in- 



dicating so comes without any 
foundation whatsoever," Riordan 
said. 

"I have no knowledge that he is 
disgruntled or unhappy about the 
job." 

Riordan, however, added that he 
was uncertain as to whether the 
Governor would reinstate Goldmark 
in his cabinet if re-elected. 

Michael Widmer, a spokesman 
for Goldmark's office also called the 
resignation reports "untrue." 

"He has no present intentions to 
leave. As to whether he'll continue 



one semester in a basic in- 
terdisciplinary course, "Issues in 
Women's Studies," before going 
on with the Women's Study 
program. 

Toward the end of their study, 
organizers say, students will be 
required to participate in an in- 
tegrative seminar which will 
"provide a forum for students to 
articulate the structure and 
coherence of their own develop- 



ment within their study plans and to 
share their knowledge and insight 
with other advanced students." 

Students may choose a faculty 
sponsor from a list provided by the 
Policy Board, which will consist of 
there students, three faculty 
sponsors, two University staff 
members, two community 
resources persons and the program 
coordinator "serving in an ex officio 
capacity." 




Photo by BW HoMrt 

Bo Diddley in concert here last week. ...a good 
show. 



after the election, he'll reassess the 
situation at the beginning of next 
year," Widmer said. 

"In the two years that I've 
worked for Secretary Goldmark, 
there have been constant rumors 
that he would resign... But he's still 

here." 

The departments of Corrections, 
Youth Services and Mental Health 
- all under the jurisdiction of' 
Goldmark - have come under fire 
by the gubernatorial hopefuls. 

In separate visits to the 
Belchertown State School this 



spring both Dukakis and Ouinn 
denounced Goldmark's policies in 
the care of the mentally retarded, 
citing the Belchertown suit as an 
example. 

The institution late last year won 
$3- million for additional staffing an 
major upgrading of buildings after a 
14-month legal fight against the 
state for inhumane conditions. 

The Walter E. Fernald Statt 
School of Waltham recently filed a 
suit for inefficient services rendered 
the residents of that institution. 



Page 2 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE^ 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, I974 



Publisher attacks Time article 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1»74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 3 



by Black News Service 
The mythology of glorifying a 
slim majority of Blacks that have 
made it into the middle class 
sharply undercuts the Black ex- 
perience, the President of the 134- 
member National Newspaper 
Publishers Ass., charged in Pitts- 
burg, Penn., recently. 

Dr. Cariton Goodlett, publisher of 
the San Francisco Black news- 
paper, was especially critical of the 
recent magazine article in Time 
magazine which "glorified" the 
theme, "Middle Class Blacks- 
Making It In America." He was just 
as critical of the article last ^ar hy 
two political analysts on the same 
subject. 



"(That> mythology (is) used to 
alienate and isolate the Black 
middle class from the true nature 
and horror of the Black experience 
as revealed by Time's description of 
"the underclass, the enduring 
dilemma," where it is stated that 
one-third of Black teenagers are 
jobless — more than double the 
rate of white teenagers; and one- 
third of Black American families 
seem permanently, without hopes 
of escalation, below the poverty 
line," Goodlett told the publishers 
and editors meeting here in the 34th 
annual convention of the Black 
Pxes& 

Goodlett warned the editors not 
to "be lulled by efforts to separate 



those Blacks who have made it in 
White America from those who 
face bleak, hopeless, bottomless 
pits of despair and will never make 

it... " 

A cybernated world such as 
America now no longer hates the 
Black man, but the Black man is no 
longer necessary; John Henery's 
heirs finally have succumbed to the 
pile-driving machine. The Black 
masses are not threatened with the 
most grievous form of ignominy — 
the most cutting and deadly form of 
racism — the racism of no-body- 
ness," Goodlett expressed. 

In Goodlett's belief, the two basis 
enemies which threaten the sun/ival 
of Blacks in America are racism and 



the efforts of alcohol, drugs and 
narcotics on the Black experience. 
"It IS we, the victims of racism, 
who cannot forget that racism is 
the main enemy of our hopes and 
aspirations, and we must continue 
to clamor for the radical surgery 
needed to rid this nation of racism. 
If symptoms of a racist society are 
ignored, then we are in peril. Our 
young Black brothers are 
demanding performance and 

deeds. 

Emphasizing that a crusade to 
save youth must be launched 
immediately, Goodlett revealed that 
his organization, along with the 
National Bar Association and the 
National Business League, have 



underwritten preliminary studies for 
the development of a three to five 
year in-depth study of the role of 
alcohol, hard drugs and other 
harmful narcotics upon the Black 
experience. 



"The Black Press must... expose 
the misery, the deprivation and the 
crime against the American creed 
which not attempts to dull our 
senses with the white media's 
efforts to alienate the economically 
successful Blacks from the teeming 
masses who wander in a wilderness 
without hope because they are 
ieaderless and voiceless," he 
concluded. 



Equal access to the law for minorities 



State and federal laws have been 
enacted to insure Third World 
Peoples to exercise rights that have 
been available to other Americans. 
That might be called "progress" 
but laws are meaningless unless 
applied to their fullest by com- 
petent council. Competent council 
has not been available to Third 
World People. Efforts have been 
made to increase the roster of 
lawyers who are from a Third World 
culture. This might be also labled 
"progress" by disinterested and 
unaffected objective observers. In 
fact, "progress" as measured by a 
concensus of Third World People 
must include legal representation 
by a person who readily, willingly, 
and effectively empathize with the 
social venditions caused by a 
history of injustices heaped upon 
Third World People. Aggressive 
Advocacy comes from believing in 
a client's interpretation of the facts. 
Belief is not a learning subject 
matter. Belief comes from direct 
experiences that have a common 
factor that allows the councellor to 
understand more than the surfact 
situation. These experiences arise 
from living within a Third World 
culture. Third World persons more 
readily encounter bigotry, poverty, 
abuse by the police, and other 
breaches of human and civil rights. 
To undo a history of injustices 
against Third World people, equal 
access to the law requires access to 
a Third World lawyer. This is the 
case, for a number of reasons. 
Among them are the necessity to 
have an individual whose 
background and life- style, portrays 
the manners and knowledge of the 
Black experience. Third World 
communities across the globe have 
been soliciting support and 
knowledge from various segments 



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of the modern world. Sometimes 
this support has been very 
rewarding and beneficial, where on 
the other hand the neglected 
masses, had to select the most 
"fivery" representative "to fight 
their cause". This process is one 
which there has been success and 
often there have been failures. At 
this stage in world development for 
Third World people, it is very 
dangerous to assume success at 
the fate of others, other than 
ourselves. 

To the questions of equal 
representation under law, we must 
also consider having representative 
counselling and defense, for Third 
World community members. 
Sometimes it requires the 
familiarity, contact, and the honest 
understanding of the "complete" 
situation, which very few 
representatives, outside the Third 
World experience can handle, nor 
adequately understand. 



In order to solve problems, which 
might be considered unique among 
Third World people, it is important 
that Third World people be given 



the opportunity to choose from knowledge, and experience which 

among them, the most competent would compliment not insult the 

representa'tive, equipped with the situations that occur, 
necessary understanding. 



Back-to-school Collegian 
needs feature articles 



The back-to-school edition of the 
Daily Collegian "may be the 
biggest, and hopefully the best" 
issue of the undergraduate student 
newspaper to date, according to 
Jerry Lazar, editor of the special 
edition, to be published September 
3 and 4. 

Last year's back-to-school paper 
weighed in at 88 pages, plus inserts, 
giving it the record of the "fattest 
Collegian ever printed," said Lazar. 
"This year's may not be as fat, but 
it will certainly be meatier." 



S {0 



BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Anrtherst, is of- 
fering a bulU rate of two cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two— sided 
copies* (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Vi cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

"For copying onto one side only, add V« cent per copy. 



Lazar, a former Collegian 
executive editor and columnist, said 
there will be three feature pull-out 
sections this year (Living, 
Automotive, and Dining and Night 
Life), a full-color cover, as well as 
the usual informative guides to 
campus and community living. 

"We're still looking for good 
articles to include in this edition, 
which will reach over 40,0CX) people 
in the five-college area," noted 
Lazar, adding that he can be 
reached at the Solstice office (545- 



0411) or at 253-2140 after 10 a.m. 
The deadline for articles is August 
12. 

Steve Ruggles, photo editor of 
the Collegian, is soliciting quality 
photographs for the back-to-school 
edition, and can be reached at the 
Solstice office. 

"I want to remind all RSO groups 
and other campus organizations 
that we would like to print their 
notices and blurbs in the back-to- 
school edition," said Lazar, "but I 
must receive them by Monday, 
August 12. No exceptions!" 



GARY A. PRESENTS 

The New Riders 
of the Purple Sage 



THE SUMMER 



EDITORS 
Michael D. Kneeland Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 
AD LAYOUT 



Steve Ruggles 
Betsy T. Wilkes 



st.ff ?. T "irf P^^ °^ '^^ University of Massachusetts. The 
staff s responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
m.n,s rators read .t for accuracy or approval pr.or to pubSn 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper They do not 
necessar.^ reflect the views of the faculty, adminisf "".on o 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials columns evLs 
cartoons, a„d letters represent ,he personal views of the Tho^s 



OFFICE: 422 S.U. 
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. 
p.m. 



4:30 



and 



Commander Cody 

and his 
Lost Plan^ Airmen 



Springfield Civic Center 

Springfield, Mass. 
Sat., August 17, 1974 
8:00 p.m. 



Tickets: $5.50 

Tickets Available at all Ticketron Outlets 
AMHERST SPRINGFIELD 

Foroc „< c tu f^fed Locke Stereo 
Faces of Earth ^^^^^^^ yyaterbeds 




Play premie ring tonight 



The curtain goes up tonight on 
Narrow Road to the Deep North a 
tragic, comic fable by Edward 
Bond. This exciting contemporary 
play is being presented by the 
UMass Summer Theatre Ensemble 
in Grinnell Arena through Saturday, 
August 10 at 8:30 p.m. 

Many faces familiar to UMass 
audiences are featured in the 
production. Joyce O'Connor takes 
the role of Georgina, the strait- 
laced, tambourine-waving sister of 
a British Commodore attempting to 
conquer an Eastern city. Tom Glynn 



plays the dotty Commodore and 
Ned Daly portrays Shogo, the 
tyrannical emperor who rules the 
city. 

Also featured in this struggle for 
power are Job Hicks, who plays 
Kolo the poet, and Marti Rose, who 
plays the young disciple, Kiro. 
These two, as well as the other 
members of the Ensemble who 
portray peasants, priests, soldiers 
and tribesmen, are caught in the 
middle, torn between Shogo's "rule 
by atrocity" and the Commodore's 
"rule by morality." 



The humor in the play is both 
subtle and broad, ranging from 
slapstick to the absurd. Kathy 
Sadoski has created stunning 
costumes, and in the unique setting 
of Grinnell Arena, Narrow Road to 
(he Deep North promises to be the 
highlight of the summer theatre 
season. James Sweeney is the 
director. 

Sponsored by the Summer 
Activities Council, the Summer 
Theatre Ensemble is offering the 
play free of charge. All per- 
formances begin at 8:30 p.m. 



Scene from Narrow Road to ttie Deep Nortti. 



Ragtime Ensemble at Tanglewood 



The sixth weekend at 
Tanglewood opens Friday evening 
with the New England Con- 
servatory Ragtime Ensemble 
conducted by Gunther Schuller 
performing Scott Joplin rags. The 
ensemble has been on a sold-out 
tour to other festivals. Gunther 
Schuller and the Ragtime Ensemble 
has achieved fame through its 
recording THE RED BACK BOOK 
of Scott Joplin rags. For 54 weeks 
this record has been listed among 
BILLBOARD'S best selling classical 
albums, and for several months has 
occupied the No. 1 spot on that list. 
A second album, the recently 
released MORE SCOTT JOPLIN 
RAGS, has reached No. 9 on that 
same list. 

On Sunday afternoon at 2:30 
p.m., Gunther Schuller conducts 
works of Scott Joplin, Honegger 
and Strauss. The concert opens 
with Honegger's Symphony No. 2 
for String Orchestra and Trumpet 
followed by Strauss' Final Scene 
from "Salome". Phyllis Curtin is 

Correction 

The Solstice printed a front-page 
article last week titled "House 
Mouse Decrees Hole-In-Wall 
Award" in which the reader was 
given the impression that the 
booklet was the new '74 booklet. It 
was not. The new House Mouse 
will soon be available in the 
Housing Office. 

The Solstice apologizes to Town 
& Country and Lincoln Realty who 
were cited in that year-old booklet 
as being uncooperative who have 
since been of assistance to the 
appropriate campus organizations. 

Also, interest must be paid on 
security deposits held over one year 
only. 



There's more 
to a bicycle 

than the name 

on the frame. 




See your specialists with: 

Rentals 

24 Hour Repair Service 
Sales, New & Used 
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Personal Attention to all Cycling 
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Amherst 
549-6904 



soloist. The closing work of the 
program is the suite from Scott 
Joplin's musical drama 

"Treemonisha" with soloists 
Carmen Balthrop, Betty Allen, Seth 
McCoy, Kenneth Hamilton, Francis 
Hester and the Tanglewood Choir, 
John Oliver, conductor. The 
performance of the suite from 
"Treemonisha", a world premiere, 
will give Scott Joplin devotees an 
opportunity to explore still further 
the many aspects of this conv 
poser's genius. Mr. Schuller, who 
arranged parts of this year's 
Grammy-winning music from "The 
Sting", is also responsible for the 
score of Suite from 

"Treemonisha". 

At 9 o'clock on Friday evening 
Arthur Fiedler conducts the Boston 
Symphony in an All-Gershwin 
concert. The concert opens with 
An American in Paris, followed by 
the Concerto in F for Piano and 
Orchestra with soloist Earl Wild. 
After intermission, Mr. Fiedler 
conducts music from Gershwin- 
Bennett's PORGY AND BESS and 
the concert closes with the 
Rhapsody in Blue, for Piano and 
Orchestra. Earl Wild is piano soloist. 

On Saturday evening, August 10, 
Kenneth Schermerhorn conducts 
the Boston Symphony in works of 



Britten and Mahler. The concert 
opens with Britten's Serenade for 
Tenor, Horn and Strings. Soloists 
include Stuart Burrow, tenor, and 
Charles Kavaloski, Principal Horn 
for the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra. The closing work of the 
program is Mahler's Symphony No. 
1 in D. 

The New England Conservatory 
Ragtime Ensemble made its debut 
in May 1972 at the American 
Romantic Music Festival held in 



Jordon Hall at the New England 
Conservatory. Its success was 
instantaneous. Soon after. Con- 
servatory President Gunther 
Schuller formed a permanent 
Ensemble. Originally the Ensemble 
consisted of twelve Conservatory 
musicians and Mr. Schuller: It has 
since expanded to include fifteen 
students. Last spring the Ensemble 
released an album of Scott Joplin 
Ragtime tunes entitled Scott 
Joplin: The Red Back Book. It was 



■ imiimii i Tw ■ » ■ ■ I ' m ■»■ ■ rii i n nil ri ■ ■ > r« 

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awarded a Grammy for the Best 
Chamber Music Performance of 
1973. In February of this year they 
released a second album of 
Ragtime tunes -More Scott Joplin 
Rags. The New England Con- 
servatory Ragtime Ensemble has 
performed in New York and 
Washington, DC, and has ap- 
peared on several television 
programs. 



MEET THE 





AT THE HOHOr^-U 




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253-9080 
256-6350 
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Htw Stmm»r 
B§lhf§ff Sififiei 

50' off 

any large pizza 

25* off 

any small pizza 

With This Coupon 
Offer Good Until Aug. 15th 

1 CLIP OUT 



Page 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY. AUGUST 8, I974 




WMUA const, suspended 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 5 



A provisional governmeni was 
set up by the executive committee 
of the senate to direct WMUA 
Radio as a result of flagrant 
violation affirmative action policy. 

Beginning sometime in May, the 
women's media project and a 
coalition of Black Media groups - 
Corp, Black News Service, and 
Black Mass Communication 
project, made various attempts to 
work out a policy, whereby WMUA 
board of directors would be more 
representative of women and third 
world students. These anempts 
were futile resulting in a formal 
request by these groups to the 
executive committee to freeze the 
budget of the radio station. 

At a meeting of the executive 
committee on May 23, a resolution 
was passed authorizing WMUA 



and the groups concerned to 
submit d signed letter agreeing to 
the necessary changes in order to 
prevent WMUA's budget from 
being frozen. 

The board of directors of WMUA 
objected to the changes. This 
resulted in the executive committee 
meeting in late July to freeze the 



budget. Considering the fact that 
there would be no radio station in 
operation, it was then decided to 
suspend WMUA's constitution 
and to establish a provisional 
government with specific in- 
structions to rewrite the con- 
stitution for approval by the student 
judiciary in the fall. 



IV^^^WW^^WIPI^IWW 



4,'H€ CAPlUm jyiBLG 



l<>« 



oflrrinii a 
summer of 

(,()() I) iiMi:s 



Protecting the motorless auto. 



Staff Photo 



Bike registrations 



Students may register their 
bicycles with the UMass security 
force. Guard William Griswold said 
he will be at a table in front of the 
library every Tuesday from 3 p.m. 
to 8 p.m. and may possibly be there 
Mondays also. 

Giswold said about five bicycles 
are stolen each week on the UMass 
campus. Some seven have been 
returned this summer. 

When a student brings a bike to 
Giswold, he carves the owner's 



social security number on the 
crossbar. Students are also given a 
patch to put on the bike which lets 
a potential thief know the bike is 
registered with the police. 

At the Umass computer center, 
the bikes are then classified into six 
categories on computer cards, 
including the make of the bike and 
its color. 

To date, about 200 bikes have 
been registered, said Giswold. 




The zaniest baseball holdout 
probably was George "Rube" 
Ellis, crack St. Louis out- 
fielder, back in 1908. Ellis 
refused to sign his contract 
until he got what he was 
holding out for - $2.50- to 
buy a new fielder's glove! 



r^/h' 



M- 




Early Spaniards believed 
that a white bird's singing 
could give the blind back 
their sight. 



• Complete Dinner Menu 

VVKDNKSD AY - SIM) AY. Featuring 

Broiled Live Lobster ^3"^! 

» Happy Hour Daily 4-6 p.m. 
all drinks only 49^ 

• Entertainment Sunday & 
Monday Nites 

» Luncheons Daily 11:30-3:00 

4«I)A.M().\ KOAI), .NOKTHAMFTO.N 



5«1-6(>H0 




WEIRP 
HAROIPS 



New Location: 
65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 



NEW and USED Clothing featuring the lowest prices 

• in town 

^Used ieans, denim iacketS/ leather jackets, western 
shirts, much more . . . 

New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 
PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

253-5291 

Open A/tonday Saturday, 10 6 
Friday Nite, till 9 





EVER PERFORM BEFORE 25,000 
PEOPLE??? HERE'S YOUR CHANCE!! 

YOUR PHOTOS AND ARTICLES CAN APPEAR 
IN THE BACK TO SCHOOL COLLEGIAN 



WRITERS 



I ) Kraturr articles for pull-out sprtions 

L'l Kssays. article, short fiction, poelrv rtc on campus ,^ ana 
relatwi topics ( i p roommatrv dining commons, course registration 
clothps, etc I. Must he pnlrrtaininR and informativr 

.11 ( ontact .lerry l^tar. 2.'i:i-2ltO. 



MONEY AVAILABLE 

Will pay up to $15 for 
best articles and photos 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

I ) Black & whltr prints of campus or area rrlatpd subjects any slw. 

2> I '"lor photo for cover, 10" x Ifi". 

:i» « ontact .Steve KuRgles for deUils, 545-«»7IS. 

DEADLINE IS AUGUST 12 

PUBLICATION DATES: SEPTEMBER 3-4 



Workshop on gaming here 



The Resource Network is 
sponsoring here a two day 
workshop on the art of gaming and 
simulation as an alternative method 
of education this week. 

It will be held from 3:30p.m. to 
10:30 p.m. on Moiiday and Tuesday 
with a one-hour dinner break. The 
venue is at Farley Lodge. 

The workshop will be run by two 
visitors to Amherst, Len and Val 
Suransky, assisted by Ron Gold- 
man of the Education School. Len 
has lengthy experience with 
games, mainly in International 
Relations, including the desipn and 
running off a game on the Middle 
East Conflict for broadcast by the 
BBC of London. He is at present a 
part-time staff- member of the 
Extension Gaming Service, Ann 
Arbor Michigan, reputedly the 
mecca of world gaming. Len and 
Ron ran a conflict game focusing 
on White- Black politics in South 
Africa in 1970, when they lectured 
in the Politics Dept. in Johan- 
nesburb. 



In this workshop participants will 
be introduced to two Ann Arbor 
games designed by Prof. Fred 
Goodman of the University of 
Michigan Ed. School. "Policy 
negotiations" is a "frame game" 
focussing on the political wheeling 
and dealing in a typical US school 
system, but players in the 
workshop will be invited to replace 
this context of the game with one 
of their own choosing. "They 
Shoot Marbles Don't They" is also 
a "frame game" where players 
develop a simulated society 
reflecting their own outlooks. The 
third game to be presented, "Bafa 
Bafa". designed by Gary Shirts of 
California, is a simpler game 
simulating a cross-cultural ex- 
change. 

The workshop will introduce 
players to a cross-section of 
games. The applicability of this 
method to almost any field of 
education will be stressed (ranging 
from archaeology to logic to the 
social sciences). Ann Arbor gamers 



have recently developped games on 
growing old, "End of the Line." 
Mental Health Services as seen by 
the patient, and students entering a 
foreign culture, "Acclimb". 

The Ann Arbor gaming 
philosophy is that ultimately 
teachers and students, once they 
feel comfortable with using the 
games of others, will go ahead to 
modify these, or indeed design their 
own games for their own 
educational needs. 

Enrollment and registration for 
the workshop can be done at the 
Resource Network through Judy 
Davis, phone number 545-0851. 
Contributions for attendance 
should be based on the individual's 
ability to pay. The Resource 
Network has laid down a guideline 
of $2-$10. Registration will be on a 
first come, first served basis and 
anyone interested in an alternative, 
experience-centred, student- 
centred learning process, or just in 
having some good fun in an un- 
threatening and congenial setting, 
is most welcome. 



Vets eligible for insurance 



Some 2.7 million Vietnam-era 
veterans are eligible for a new low- 
cost Veterans Group Life Insurance 
program which offers as much as 
$20,000 coverage for $3.40 per 
month to young veterans, but they 
must apply before August 1, 1975, 
according to William F. Connors, 
Director of the Boston Veterans 
Administration office. Connors 
pointed out that more than 68,000 
Vietnam-era veterans in 

Mass=ichusetts become eligible. 

The nonrenewable, five-year 
term insurance is available for 
veterans discharged from military 
service since April 2, 1970. 

Connors said that the new 
Veterans Administration- 
supervised program, authorized 
May 24 under the Veterans In- 
surance Act, also offers coverage in 



amounts of $5,000, $10,000 and 
$15,000. Rates for the maximum 
$20,000 coverage are $3.40 per 
month for veterans aged 34 and 
under and $6.80 for those 35 and 
over. 

Application forjns for veterans 
discharged prior to August 1, 1974, 
are available from VA offices or 
from the Office of Servicemen's 
Group Life Insurance, 212 
Washington St., Newark, N.J. 
07102. Applicants must furnish 
evidence of good health. However, 
VA-rated service-connected 
disabilities will be waived. 

Servicemen discharged after 
August 1 will receive application 
forms automatically, Connors 
pointed out. Personnel leaving 
active duty are permitted 120- 
premium-free days to convert 



Servicemen's Group Life Insurance 
to Veterans Group Life Insurance 
without medical examination. 



Really! 



Priscilla Goodbody, the NBC 
censor, might be listening more 
often to their Saturday evening 
news broadcast. 

Anchorman Tom Brockaw was 
describing to his national audience 
how nude bathers in some areas 
must be warned by police they are 
breaking the law before an arrest is 
made. 

In a rare display of locker room 
chuckles, Brockaw said it was "sort 
of like" a traffic citation, "like when 
your headlights are out or your 
bumper is dragging." 



Steak Hr" Brrw Presents 



I il ikarply rUlig Miti 
wt kBTt aMti a laaO ktrtnct thtrft 

•I ti< Pir ftTMB 

fir BMr.WlM tr laagrli* 
witkdlutr. 
Diutr iMlita all tka lalad yra caa nakt. 

i Bockei of Shrimp 

t:; ;ii. i: X :::l I. :i.:t i .t::- xi:(i: Si. 95 

Baked Stuffed C!ir. 1.35 

French Onioo Soup 

Cr::;:t::pp(«.::.:.:i ■i.:ilSt:t:Clitti ,9S 




loDtless SirloiD Steak. N.Y. Col 

Icoeless Sirloin Steak, NT Cut Large 

Bone In Sirlom Steak Heavy Cot . 

Sliced Sirloin Steak 

Bee! Brochetie with Kice 

Bal! Sprint Chicken. Broiled or Tenjaki 

Steakboroer on a Seeded Bnn 

Cheeseborger 

loist Prime libs of Beef 

Filll Ml^BBB 

Broiled Salf Shriip 
Filit MilDiB iii 

' tilti u I lij Cum 

Bikid Piuu. 
FriBch frui 
CorB OB tki 

SlBtNd I 



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(lONEKSS SlllOW NT CUT) lEBIllllY till 



(lONEKSS SlllOW N T CUT) 



TUr. Roast Prime ^4.25 
Ribs of Beef «••"•""" 



M.95 

BEtlLAILT SS.IS 



TmiRS"'meJ%«sr»5.95 

Samvlhinn REfiULARlT $I.SS 

tor Every Tnnle — 
Fitel Xtignon, ' j Chicken. Broiled .S/iri»i/#, Share il — 
Only $1.95 Extra! 

Plus, of course, all the salad you can moke. 




The 
Rusty Nail Inn 



|»rr«-riil» 
KJMTK and ^|{ll)\^ 

Ifittch Chakour 

and the 
Iftission Band 

S\;rKI)\V and SINDW MTK 

Some of Ifi y Best Friends 

Music 

riKSDW and WIDNKSI) \V 

Outer Space 



Rte. 47, Sunderland 663-4937 

Take Kte. 1 IH north, take left after Pennis Academy and 
follow to end. Take another left, 2(M> vards and vou're there! 



MA5r£RcHAR&E 



ROUTE 9, 
MADLCy 




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»««*«**4*«*«« * 



Page 6 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1974 



Campus carousel 



By TONY GRANITE 
FREUDIAN SLIP was manifested in 
a recent edition of the USoFIa 
Oracle, when a news story by the 
managing editor of the student 
paper attributed as its source the 
"Board of Regents." 
ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET is 
what eight southern states call a 



program offering certain graduate 
programs to out-of-state students 
at in-state tuition rates. 

The Georgia State U. Sentinel 
also incicates that the study 
programs up for grabs include such 
as bio-math, fisheries and aqua- 
culture, radio astronomy, ecology 
and actuarial science. 



HEADLINE OF THE \NEEK ap- 
peared in the Massachusetts Daily 
Collegian, this Spring, over a story 
about the competition among 
fraternities started at U Miami for 
building the world's largest banana 
split. The local head said, "Greeks 
Go Bananas." 

HOT TERM PAPERS again made 
headlines when New York Attorney 
General Louis J. Lefkowitz warned 
academicians this Spring that he 



would take steps against schools 
which did nothing to stOD what he 
said" is a resurgence of the buying 
and selling of papers." 

He pointed out that colleges still 
allowing such ads to appear in 
campus newspapers could be 
charged with complicity with the 
companies that advertise such 
papers. 

ADD CAMPUS HUMOR: From the 
pen of Michael H. O'Donnell of the 
Northern lowan comes a column of 



"Martian Humor." Sample: "What 
does a Martian call an Earthman 
who is stoned? — Resourceful." 

"What has three eyes, six legs, a 
huge green nose and can't see? — 
A Venetian, blind." 

Hopefully, it won't catch on. 

^The Paper Housed 



cn 
en 

CO 



65 UNIVERSITY DRIVE f 



ANNIVERSARY 







Finast of Hadley 
Mountain Farms Mall 



Finast will no longer Inorease prices of food once placed on our shelves 



On Wednesday. July 24. 1974 all Finast Super- 
markets tiegan a new priang policy on Grocery, 
Meat and Produce items 



Wtien items are restocked on the shelves, the 3. As regular prices go down. Finast will im- 

new. higher priced items will be placed laehind the mediately reduce the price on shelf stock, and the 

lower priced items lower price will always be honored at the register 

When a can or a package shows more than one 

1 When Finast is forced to make a price in- 2. Weekly specials or sale items' are priced pr,ce, the customer pays the lowest price for that 

crease, cans and packages already price marked lower than regular prices Any remaining after the can or package, 
on the shelves will be sold at the old lower price sale event, will be repriced upward. 



4. Baked goods, baby food, fair trade, and 
Items controlled by state laws are exempt from 
this new policy 

5 Until current stocks are sold there will be 
some Items of our many thousands with more 
than one price marking on the can or package 
Please bear with us during this transition 



More Barbecue Values 

Ground Chuck 



Chuck Patties 

OTM Mllh 1 08 
I Macmnc I fe 



In Stora 
P«i« I 



London Broil I^SST. . . 
Cube Steak 'STuT . . . . 
Rib Steak smturuTihRib, . . 
Blade Steak boo«.» 

Rib Roast 5Ih (hru 7t^ Bit . . . 

Shoulder Roast Bon.ies.. 

Italian 

Primo 4^ 

Hot or Sweet | 

Freah Chicken Parts 

Chicken Legs 

Tender 
Meaty 



lb 



lb 



Drumsticks ib79* 

It, 89* 



Breasts sk.nies5'.ib1,49«hote. 




In Store Bake Shop 

Turnovers 



Assorted 

Fresh 



4 69' 



Hard Rolls Fr.ne». 

AvvlatM in Slom Knlh Bik* ! 



59* 



Orange Juice 

65^ 



Finast 
100% Pure 



half 
gallon 



Befit Yogurt a„f.,.o, 4 ^^89« 

Cottage Cheese f-* 



^?59« 




Frozen Food Values 

Finast Orange 

Juice 

00 



6 oz 
cans 



Jiffy's Meats 



Gr<»y t Saintxrv 
Staali Gravy t T^k«y 
Biwf t BiKiM StxgiWIi 
Sauot t Muibaiis 



32ozi|09 



Finast Spinach oSHtSd 5 
Whip Topping «o«.« . 2 



Finest Beer A Wine Shop 

Ballantine Beer 



pack 



612 oz^ 
btis I 



Lambrusco 



Ruinite Red 
or White Wine 



24 oz 
btl 



neserve the Righ' to I imii 0\jantiti«s 





Fresh Whole 

Chickens 



272 to 
3 lbs 



Center Cut Bone In - Chuck 

steak or Roast 

Senni Boneless California Chuck 

Steak or Roast 

Fresh or Smoked - Water Added 

Pork Shoulders 




Tender 
Juicy 



Lean 
Tasty 
Pork 



Fresh Large 5 to 6 lbs gm ^^{ 

Roasting Chicken Otf 







*s^ 



\ 



.■■'"fGULABCUTi 

.iRtEN BEANS . 



White or 
Assorted Colors 



Limit 3 
PKgs Please 



Ajax-Laundry 
10* deal pack 

Americas 
Finest Quality 



ScotTowels 

Hudson NaTkL 

Detergent 
C&C Cola 
Green Beans 
Shortening 
Veal Parmagiana 
Finast Spinach 




140 Ct 
roll 



3 140 ct 400 
pkgs I 



49 oz 

pkg 



half 
gallon 



Finast Cut 



Richtex 
Blended 



79' 
69° 

4^sv? oz^OO 
cans I 

3 1b 409 
can I 

09 



Jiffy's 2 lb 4 
Frozen P^Q I 



15 oz 
cans 



100 



Cucumber Pickles c«n. , . 'ir 45* 



Blue Borateenn . 
Brillo Soap Pads 



79* 



pkg 

"t? 49« 



Storage Bags B.g««. . . . 
Fabric Softener^:.... 
Vlasic Relish "-M^oar'. 



. . 'ir 1.49 

4 r.' 1.00 



•*!*. 




First Othe Fresh Produce from FInastI 

Cantaloupes 




for 




Assorted Foliage Plants 



Mew StotM ■• ""• 



2.1 



00 



Double Your Money pack 
Meat Guarantee 



At Finast oof rrwats are msoecteO Dy trained experts and 
are tnrnn'»*KJ o* e«cess Done waste and tal belCK* weiohing 
and packaQtng At Fmast we are so conttdeni o* the Superior 
quality o* oor rneals that we pfoudiy otter an uncorxlit fonai 
gua'antee mat gtves yOu double youf rrxxwy back or any 
meat porcnase whtch does not completely satisfy yOu So 't 
the meal you buy does noi ownpietely satisly you, see our 
store manager with proot o( purchase who will kirxMy re- 
tixv3 ine purchase price double 




Mr Deli Specials 

Boiled Ham 



Imported 
Sliced To Order 



lb 



Amer. Cheese ^^*° 
Pastrami t<fc>»- 



.1.29 

• lb 1 .39 

Bologna <^"^" t, 1.29 

Liverwurst";?* it 1.29 



. Mr Oak 

AC II 

AvwiatXe in Stares with Service Oei> 




International Seafood 



Grey Sole 



Fillet 



The Aristocrat 
of ine Fillet Family 



lb 



Ocean Perch Fillet .b79* 



Bay Scallops 'SS;;:s'^ 



pkg 



1.39 




Save With These Coupons 



With This 
Coupon 



One Package of 16 

Tetley Tea Bags 



. V j l^^i 







And A Purchase ot $5 or More 

Limit One Coupon 

Valid ttvu Sal Aug 10 



Hawaiian Punch 



Red With 
This Coupon 



.4€oz' 
cans 



00 



li^l^i 







and A Purctiaae oi t& or More 

tinvt One Coupon 

Valid inru Sat Aug lO 



Save 25^ ^couiT 



Towards the Purchase of One 1 lb pkg 

Finast Lo Suds Detergent 







With in* Purcoaie ol One 

4fl u Ml Ra n Barrel 

Fabric Sottener Valid tnru Aug 10 



H^^J 



Save 204ISave 50 



Willi This Coupon 
On Or>e S? OI Wl 

Ivory Liquid 
Dctflrg6nt 

[m] "431 
VaM thru Aug 10 



lla^^l 



With This Coupon 
Or\e ^0 Ctf tar 

IMaxwell House 
Inst. Coffee 

Valid thru Aug 10 



ifjQ^y 



Save 12^11 Save 15 



IWilh This Coupon 
On One 12 o> pkg 

Total 
Cereal 



IMitn Thi* Coupon 
On One 7* o» lar 



IfJ^^^ 



I 

(m)m433 I 
I 



VaM thru Aug 10 



Heinz Kosher 
Dill Spears 

[M)m43sJ 

Valid thru Aug 10 



^ffl^^ 



Rnast 



SUPERMARKETS 

Pric«9 ErfMctive thru Sat , Aug 10. 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 7 



Survey results 



Students discontent with SGA 



By Mike Kneeland 

No wonder Student Government 
Association President Richard 
Savini wants to better the image of 
the student leaders. 

In a recent survey compiled by 
Jacqueline Cormier, special 
assistant to the president of the 
University, she concluded "UMass 
students are not satisfied with their 
student government." 

Warning that "interpretation of 
any survey is subject to extreme 
personal biases", and that all 
comments from the 383 students 
surveyed should be read, she said 
students don't know what the 
government does and how it does 
it. 

"Those surveyed predominantly 
felt that the student government 
has not sincerely attempted to 
explain itself and what it has done 
to the population," wrote Cormier. 

When the students were asked, 
"What is your current level of 
satisfaction with student govern- 
ment?" some replies were: 

iimiiiHiiiimniiiiiiNiiiiimiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiNiiiiNi 



■Not at all satisfied. I see no 
benefits at all resulting from its 
existence. 

-The only thing SGA is known 
for is spending increasingly large 
amounts of student money on 
projects that I never heard ot. 
-The senate's only information 
outlet seems to be the Collegian, 
which I consider to be less than 
dependable. 

-To be completely honest with 
you, I know little or nothing about 
student government. I'm at present 
very involved with my work and 
haven't had much time. 

-No different from the U.S. 
government. Unresponsive, disdant 
and unaccessable. 

-Seems to be lacking in 
seriousness. 

Another question Cormier 
presented to the students was, 
"Does student government fairly 
represent the common needs of the 
entire student body?" Some 
responses to that question follow: 

-I don't know; what is this 



student government? 

-I think it does (fairly well) 
because I feel they are trying to 
improve the things that need to be 
improved. 

-As good as it can because it is 
so big. 

-While there are a few sincere 
members, I don't think I'm 
generalizing when I say that the 
senate represents a body of 
egotists intent on using the office 
for purposes other than helping the 
average student. 

-But minority groups seem to 
gain more than the average 
students. 

-I'd like to see the day that it 
does. 

Although most students felt they 
were not being adequately 
represented, Cormier said those 
students interviewed do not 
generally feel a new governmental 
structure is necessary. 

Her question: "Is your level of 
dissatisfaction with the student 
government extreme enough to 



make you want to see a new form 
of student government?" Some 
responses to that question follow: 

- If I was sure it would work 
better, yes. 

-I don't know enough about it. 

-No matter how bad the present 
SGA is, the effect upon the student 
body are so negligible as to warrent 
any interest in a new SGA. 

I'm not sure we need a student 
government. 

-Emphasis should be placed on 



duties, and obligations to the 
student community. Stop running 
personality contests and conflicts. 




62 Main St., Amherst 
Tel. 253-7835 
EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT 
Lunc|^pecials99^&up^ 



i H i ii i iMi i ui iiiiiHiiitiiiiiHiiHiiiiiiiiiHHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiniiiHimiiimiiiiiiii 



WARNING!!!! 

August 12 is the deadline for getting your j 

articles in the Back-to-School COLLEGIAN | 

i 

Don't say we didn't tell ya so!!! | 

Contact Jerry Lazar for details I 

253-2140 or 545-0716 1 

liHiiiimimiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiHiHHfiimiiiHiiiiinHiiiiHiiiiiiiiimiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimHiiiiiiiiiH 



aarsi 




^ EIMT 



^ 



summer shirts 

tanh tops 





• • 



• • • • halter tops 

iVfs. Lee slachs • • • • 

great savings 

UNIVERSITY STORE 

Campus Center 



O- ^-1 















iR'o 



\ 



UMSS sumertfimre e/ism/e 



)reseni-5 



<? p/d(/ /?(/ 



TIORT?^ 



Or/nne/ Are/Id S-^iOpm 

no ddPiiss/on charge 



r*j'T??.'S- 



"CSSmBr- 



• V^ ^ /» ji r» «» *• i' «' #" * * • » .T».'» 



f »r,^M 



Pa«e I 



THE JtllMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY. AUGUST 8, 1»74 



THURSDAY, AUGUST I, 1f74 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



PSfl* t 




Teacher examination dates 
set for college seniors 



Mosakowski listening to voters Saturday. 



Mosakowski says 



College seniors preparing to 
teach school may take the National 
Teacher Examinations on any of the 
four different test dates announced 
recently by Educational Testing 
Service, a nonprofit, educational 
organization which prepares and 
administers this testing program. 
New dates for the testing of 
prospective teachers are: 
November 9, 1974, and January 25, 
Aprils, and July 19, 1975. The tests 
will oe given at nearly 500 locations 
throughout the United States, ETS 
said. 

Results of the National Teacher 
Examinations are used by many 
large school districts as one of 
several factors in the selection of 
new teachers and by several states 
for certification or licensing of 
teachers. Some colleges also 
require all seniors preparing to 
teach to take the examinations. 

On each full day of testing, 
prospective teachers may take the 
Common Examinations which 
measure their professional 
preparation and general 

educational background and an 
Area Examination which measures 
their mastery of the subject they 
expect to teach. 

Prospective teachers should 
contact the school systems in 
which they seek employment, or 
their colleges, for specific advice on 
which examinations to take and on 
which dates they should be taken. 



THE BULLETIN OF IN- 
FORMATION FOR CANDIDATES 
contains a list of test centers, and 
information about the 

examinations, as well as a 
Registration Form. Copies may be 



obtained from college placement 
officers, school personnel 
departments, or directly from 
National Teacher Examinations, 
Box 911, Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey 



BELL'S 



%/ 



a HOUSE 



SHORT OF MONEY??? 

GET A GREAT PIZZA AT A BUDGET PRICE 

Pizza & Hot Oven Grinders 

Open: Weekdays, 10a.m. - 1 a.m. 

Weekends, 10a.m. - 2a.m. 

65 University Drive, Amherst 

CALL 256-8011/253-0051 



he'll support all democrats 



Kenneth Mosakowski, the 27- 
year old library assistant here who 
is running for Congress, announced 
his campaign leaders Saturday 
night. 

Some 30 people attended a lawn 
party in Hadley to hear Mosakowski 
name Nadine Gallo of Hadley as his 
campaign manager. She is a 
teacher at the Park School in 
Easthampton. 

Carol A. Scheurer, a research 
assistant in the botany department 
here, was named the campaign 
treasurer. Mosakowski said she will 
bring financial credibility to his 
campaign both to the public and 
the organization itself. 

David B. Nusante of Nor- 
thampton and Francis N. Callahan 
of Pittsfield were named co- 
chairman of the Mosakowski for 
Congress Commiteee. 

Musante is the associate director 
of the UMass computer center and 



Northampton 
V.W. ® 

PINTO 
SPECIALS 

72 Ford Pinto, 4 sp., std., blue 

$1495.00 

72 Ford Pinto. Green, 4 cyl., 
auto. 

$1695.00 

71 Ford Pinto 4 cyl., std., brown. 

$1495.00 

71 Ford Pinto, auto.. Gold 

$1695.00 

see them all at 

Northampton V.W. 

246 King St. 
Northampton 
584-8620 . . 



serves as chairman ot the namp- 
shire County Commissioners. 
Callahan, a former member of the 
Pittsfield License Board, is a cost 
analyst for General Electric. 

Mosakowski told the gathering 
he is not used to being the can- 
didate, having to ask people to 
work for him personally. He noted 
he had been an early supporter of 
Senator Geroge McGovern "long 
before it was fashionable" and that 
he is a former campaign manager of 
State Representative James 

Collins. 

Saying the threatening clouds 
overhead were another example of 
Republican "dirty trick," the UMass 
graduate said he completely 



supports the democratic ticket. He 
also said he will support his op- 
ponent, attorney Thomas Manning, 
should he win in the Sept. 10 
democratic primary election. 

Mosakowski later said money 
could be a problem in the pirmaries, 
but hopes the democratic 
organization will help financially 
support the campaign of that 
election's winner. 

The First Congressional District 
seat is presently held by Republican 
Silvio Conte, who hasn't been 
opposed since 1962. Mosakowski 
says it's erroneous to believe Conte 
is unbeatable and remains op- 
timistic of his chances to defeat the 
republican. 



® 



9i» 



tevis 



AR&Hf^ 



WHIM 



NAVy^ 

Iff. UMf^'iNm 




IN 



'jparJi/irtj^a 



STRAI6HT' LE6S 

t rtAiRs. 




^ca ti Pleasant St, AnhSc 




o 







AUGUST 7 a 
BLUE WALL • 



9. /O 



,«>»»» » J » 4 t « , • t « f ••«« r «»•*••«• t't • 4 *t . 



\ >S * # f ^ ^ » ^ < < 



f f f # I JT, #*, fosiiPf^^ri 



Noxzema 
Skin Cream 




noxieMl 602. 

Jar 



69 



REGULAR 
OR LIME 



Old Spice 
Shave Cream 

Cans ^V^V 




Lavoris 
Moutiiwasii 



||avo«is| 32 oz. 
Bottle 



99 




Colgate 
Toothpaste 



9 02. 

Tube 



79 




Head and 
Shoulders 



SHAMPOO 



4 oz. TUBE. 

7 oz. LOTION 

OR 

5 oz. JAR 



99 



Efferdent 
Tablets 




Pkg. 
of 
60 



89 



ban 



Ban Roll-on 
Deodorant 



^m^ 1.5 oz. ^^I^^f 

mH Bottle »y^p 



Cashmere Bouquet Talc 29'' Stop & Shop Deodorant 49'' Stop & Shop Deodorant 59' 

6.5 oz. CAN REGULAR — 7 02. CAN ANTI-PERSPIRANT — 8 oz. CAN 



Band Aid 
Plastic Strips 

2Pkgs. ^^^^^ 
of 70 ^M^B 
SHEER ^^^ ^^^ 

Stop & Shop Hair Spray 59*" 

REGULAR OR HARD TO HOLD — 13 02. CAN 



Get your Stop & Shopsworth! 



Lamb, ftiast beef and 

steak are special. 

ConsumerSsus 





99*= 
49c 
89^ 



starts Monday. Aug. 5 - Saturday. Aug. 10 

Peanut Butter ^ 69= 

STOP & SHOP — CHUNKY OR CREAMY 

Strawberry Preserve 59*= 

SMUCKERS 12oz JAR 

Red Rose Tea Bags 

100 COUNT PACKAGE 

Apple Juice UZlS^:^ 
Pampers Diapers 

OVERNIGHT — 12 COUNT PACKAGE 

Baggies stXge Bags 69'= 

50 COUNT PACKAGE 

Dynamo Detergent 89" 

LIQUID LAUNDRY DETERGENT — 28 oz. BOTTLE 

Ajax Liquid Detergent 59' 

22 oz BOTTLE 

Cat Food - 4 lb. Bag "-IZ^ 99" 
Dog Food -5 lb. Bag 79" 

STOP & SHOP — GRAVY OR CHUNK 

Rival Dog Food %%"' 4 cVni '1 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES OR BURGERS & GRAVY 
Quick meals front the fn-vser! 

John*s Pizza 

Ocean Spray Cranorange 5 '." ^1 
Roman Lasagne ^^^"or^piy^o^P 99^ 
KruncheeFish Fillets a'crPASE 49'^ 
Taste O'Sea Clam Platter %'.r 59^ 
Taste O'Sea Haddock Dinner'p"," 59^ 

BIRDS EYE^QC 



hasfuiiMlth 
hamburger. 

Our fresh meat specials are just a few of ^'^ 
the reasons to shop with us this week. Pick up "Consum- 
erisms". It tells you the best way to sizzle hamburger so 
they'll turn out juicy and delicious, and the best way to get 
a glorious tan without sizzling yourself. 

Fresh American Graum Lamb Sale! 



^m SHOULDER ^ ^^^^ 

Lamb Chops 



Tender, juicy, good eating young lamb 
trimmed to give you extra value. Oven 
broiled or charcoal grilled, your family will 
love them. Another all week special to 
give you your Stop & Shopsworth! 




Loin Lamb Chops 'I" ^^Ib. 
Rib Lamb Chops '1" Lamb Patties 89 
Whole Lamb Legs-Oven Ready 1" 

Lamb Legs-Oven Ready Leg Half 1" 



lb 




Sizzlhip:, fioinhn'ss for your harhrriip! ^ 

Lean'Ground Beef 
Patties 



'Simply Super lean ground beel 
IS not less than 76% lean 



1 



19 



lb. 



CHEESE 

HOMESTYLE 13 oz PKG. 



Orange Juiced 



2 oz. Can 



100". FlOniDA ORANGE JUICE 



1 



Chopped or Leaf Spinach 6 'p"",' ' 

FAIRLANE BRAND 

Breyers Natural Ice Cream c',-"! M'' 
Hendrie's Ice Cream ,*T.,^^crT"o'N '1°' 
Hendrie's Ice Milk Bars 99^ 

12C0UNT — 27oz PACKAGE 

Hendrie's Juice Bars ,y H^T^gb 79' 

Shoestring Potatoes 3 Bags M 

STOP & SHOP — 20 oz BAG 



Big Daisy Bread 

4»* 



SLICED WHITE 
BIG 1'/2 LB LOAF 



"Quality-Protected'' Beef Naturally Aged! 

Bottom Round 
Roast 

Top Sirloin Roast 
Back Rump Roast 
Eye of the Round Roast 



Extra tender, 

flavorful, juicy and 

well trimmed. 



$•4 49 

I lb 

$•4 59 

I lb 




Qualiiy-Protected ' 



'1 



$•4 89 

lb 



FOR $ 

SWISSING 



$•4 79 

lb 



Stop & Shop Jewish Rye lm. 

OR PUMPERNICKLE BREAD — 16 oz LOAF 



i«o. 45c 



Stop & Shop Apple Pie 



PkB 



65^ 



Stop & Shop Coconut Cake V," 69'= 
Maple Walnut Cake ^ITAII^^ge 69^ 
Daisy Plain or Sugar Donuts 45' 

llVa 02. PACKAGE OF 12 

Sandwich Rolls ZM 

STOP A SHOP - 1202. PKfl ot 9 



I 



Bottom Round 
Steak 

Top Sirloin Steak '1 

Tenderetfes individual cubed steak-round 

Eye of the Round Steak 

*^ Fresh from our Garden of Eatin 7 

///\M,^^ - ^ JUMBO r 27 SIZE ^M^^ ^ 

;f I JCatitaloupes CQ^ 

^^» ^_ ^^y^^ Summe'-time goodness al a sweet price ^^^ 

ii»mi altcrtd lo' MK not •>i»a»l* "• e«M io'« «' '« o'"" '•'»" «••'•'» <" ""olMiUti 





WITH THIS COUPON 
AND A $5 PURCHASE 

STOP & SHOP 

WAFFLES 

FROZEN — 5 oz PKG 

Limit one pkg per customer 

Good Mon Aug 5 - Sat Aug 10 



i$< 



Nowadays, it makes more sense than 
ever to get acquainted with our Stop & 
Shop Brand ... for it offers you a sure 
way to lower food coFfs without sac- 
rificing quality. Our na a on the label 
guarantees you top quality, and you 
pay less! That's getting your Stop & 
Shopsworth! As an extra incentive to 
try our Stop & Shop Brand, we give you 
this coupon for FREE Stop & Shop 
Waffles. We think you'll like them. 

%tini-pricvd* dmry specials! 

Orange Juice 

^L Conis 9^L 



TROPICANA 
32 oz CONTAINER 



Light n' Lively s..ini^^-'.m%Hj 89^ 
Swiss Style Yogurt |?=o*ne 3 2 •' 89^ 
King Sour iMiTATioNSourCreamco^l 39* 
Riggio Sliced Provolone p." 69* 



Sliced fresh to order i 

AVAILABLE IN STORES FEATURING A SERVICE DELI 

Genoa Salami 



CARANDO BRAND 



qlr 



coc 

A deli selection (or everyone 'b 97 

Weaver Cooked Chicken Roll ,t 89' 
CarandoPepperoni Z M" 

Hygrade Italian Loaf .1? 65' 

Provolone Cheese slicing *!? *!*' 



-A 



Quick meid ideas! 

Hot Dogs 



OR BEEF FRANKS 

ARMOUR STAR-1 LB PKG 



89* 



.eg- 



or Bee* Frankt $4 09 
1 lb Pko ' 



Rath Sausage Meat 

Oscar Mayer Weiners 

Oscar Mayer Sliced Bacon ]^l M'» 

Oscar Mayer Smokie Links VV/M** 

More budfiel stretchinfi speciala! 

Coolced Flounder 

TASTE O'SEA FROZEN FILLETS OO^ 
1 LB PACKAGE ▼^ 

White Shrimp 1? 

MEDIUM SIZE — FROZEN 

Stop & Shop Fish & Chips ll\ M" 

Quick and easy meuh 
From our Summer Kitchen! 

iSt Fresit Pizza 

LARGE — 1 LB. PACKAGE gOC 
Get your Stop & Shopsworth ^^ W 

Tapioca Puddings Ass"RT'i°oV,i:vlRs39' 
2 lb. Potato Salad, p-g 89* 

2 LB MACARONI SALAD OR 2 LB COLE SHAW 

Twin Sub Sandwich 'C 69* 

Tht Following !>•">• AMiitbl* In Sloru FHturing A Sorvico 0*11 

Imported Ham 

S119 



HONEY GLAZED 



lb. 



Bean or Beet Salad 7 59= 

Garden or Cucumber Salad r 59* 



All Stop & Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience. 



Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURsbAV/AUGOsir >i 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1974 



m 



Your weekly stars 



by Stella. Wilder 

Any who will recognize through 
the close observation of celestial 
steadfastness the necessity for his 
or her own stability where daily 
activities are concerned, and as a 
result will behave in such a way 
throughout the coming week that 
neither physical nor spiritual upset 
can gain a foothold — any who will 
do this will more or less insure 
success on every level, including 
that which embraces the ac- 
cumulation of material gain. Any 
who, through ignorance or stub- 
bornness insist upon allowing their 
responses to develop and find 
expression willy-nilly, with no 
regard for stability of any kind or 
duration, are destined for disap- 
pointment over the next six days at 
least, and possibly with failure of a 
permanent nature. 

Proper rest is essential to the 
fulfilling of aims and ambitions this 
week. As far as success is con- 
cerned this week, it is so at odds 
with fatigue that the two ternis are 
all but mutually exclusive. 

LEO (July 23- Aug. 7) - A 
marked tendency to do things your 
own way rather than the way 
practicality would dictate is to be 
put down early in the week — and 
kept down! (Aug. 8-Aug. 22) — 
Take special pains this week to 
avoid overstimulation of any sort. 
The more nearly on an even keel 
you can remain, the better off you'll 
be. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23- Sept. 7) - A 
period of despondency early in the 
week must not be allowed to keep 
you from moving forward at pace 
calculated to gain success. Be sure 
of yourself. (Sept. 8-Sept. 22) - All 
indications point to difficulties 
where partnerships are concerned. 
Let your point of view be known to 
all who are involved. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) - All 
associated with you should be 
taken into your confidence, 
especially should you be con- 
templating change of any sort. 
Make no move alone. (Oct. 8-Oct. 
22) — Minor accidents could result 



in major disappointments unless 
you are really determined to 
succeed in what you are presently 
doing. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7) - 
Continued optimism is the best way 
to success this week. If you fail to 
look on the bright side, you may 
find yourself forfeiting gain. (Nov. 
8-Nov. 21) — Negative aspects of 
your career may make themselves 
more known than usual this week. 
Nevertheless, you can succeed 
admirably if you will but try. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22- Dec. 7) 
— Any activities connected with 
the entertainment world should be 
entered into carefully. But try for 
whatever enjoyment you can get. 
(Dec. 8- Dec. 21) - Great activity 
follows lengthy discussions. Don't 
forget to inform higher-ups and all 
in authority of your plans for the 
week. Be optimistic. 

CAPRICORN {Dec. 22- Jan. 5) - 
Opportunity followed by activity 
followed by exceptional benefit: 
this is the week's raw schedule of 
events. It's up to you to make it 
work. (Jan. 6-Jan 19) — 
Revolutionary change may get 
underway on the home front this 
week. For the time being, however, 
hold the fort. Yield nothing yet. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3) - 
You may well benefit others far 
more than you benefit yourself this 
week. Keep close to home as the 
days wear on; seek aid if need be. 
(Feb. 4-Feb. 18) — Disharmony on 
the home front or on the em- 
ployment scene may cause you to 
add fuel to the fire of distress early 
in the week. Remain calm. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 5) - 
Several meetings with one or more 
people of influence could well pick 
your career up out of the doldrums 
and head it into clear sailing. 
(March 6-March 20) — Business 
success depends a great deal on 
your success on the home front. 
Get along with younger family 
members and do well at large. 

ARIES (Maach 21 -April 4) - 
Children play a prominent p>art in 
your success this week. Take care 
not to offend the parent of 



youngsters who can help you out. 
(April 5-April 19) — New work of a 
special and highly technical nature 
plays a large part in this week's 
success. Know the limits of your 
own understanding. Study hard. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 5) - 
Confidential matters which have 
been placed in your keeping must 
be guarded well. Others may try to 
wheedle information out of you. 
(May6-May20) — Good friends are 
by far the most important element 
in the making of this week's 
happiness. Don't neglect to 
cultivate the old as well as the new. 

GEMINI (May 21 -June 6) - 
Indications are that you will have 
difficulty knowing the difference 
between success and failure early in 
the week. Make your guesses good 
ones! (June 7-June 20) — Your 
career may well demand your 
undivided attention this week. 
Nevertheless, steal some time away 
for the cultivation of a friendship. 

CANCER (June 21-July 7) - 
You would be wise to make hay 
while the sun shines. Now is an 
excellent time for stretching your 
powers of concentration. Think 
things through. (July 8-July 22) — 
Separation from those near and 
dear to you could cause you more 
concern than you had thought 
possible. Make every effort to adapt 
quickly. 




THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



page 11 




opgK siao^s'ioo J j 



CLO 



^^(7 



JCJHS 
OyPKETS 

GOATS 




Kostek raps on 



(Continued from P. 12) 

Yes or no? Goof or gaffe? Half. 

Basic Sly shines two ways: either 
flowing flushes that go down with 
no quibble or effort ("Family Af- 
fair", "if you want me to stay", 
(You Caught Me) Smilin", "Hot 
Fun IN The Summertime"). Pure 
inspiration. The other Great Sly 
goes absolutely bongo on it all, and 
flashes his Family Stone as madly 
fast as possible; notes tumble in 
everywhere, lyrics scald their way 
on out-no room for anything else. 



A good example is in WOOD- 
STOCK where you just had to jump 
with the band ("I Want To Take 
You Higher", "Music Lover", 
"Dance To The Music"). 

A few of each are on SMALL 
TALK: "Time For Livin" and "Say 
You Will" are nice and flow while 
"Loose Booty" and "Livin" While 
I'm Livin" crunch along. The others 
aren't bad, they're just.., distant . . . 

A less than awe-inspiring CK. 

Ramoant-Nazareth (A&M SP- 



For the first time ttjis summer, 
nobody guessed the mystery photo 
of last week, runner Ben Jipcho of 
Kenya. 

Better luck with this week's 
mystery photo. This week's winner 
will win TWO free beers com- 
pliments of your SOLSTICE editors. 
Entries should be made at the 
SOLSTICE office, room 422 of the 
Student Union, or call 545-0411. 



3641) time 39:43 

Half of this band's material is 
rank. They babble things like "it's 
better to have loved and lost . . .", 
"you light my day-way", and (on 
the very next cut, "Sunshine every 
day-helps to light my way". Dumb. 

But, they keep and create 
enough excitement through refried 
pyrotechnical use of Manuel 
Charieton's lead guitar who gives 
us that rare jet plane whoosh feel so 
many of us bone conduction 
junkies crave. 

Their torrental twisting of The 
Yardbirds' "Shapes Of Things" 
isn't as daring as their previous 
mutilations of Dylan's "Ballad Of 
Hollis Brown" and Joni Mitchell's 
"This Flight Tonight" that sucked 



[Classifieds 

JSERVICES 



the tunes into a new realm of 
demonic frenzy; Love it, hate it, but 
respect them for trying. 

While not the occasional reaper 
that their last, LOUD N' PROUD 
was, RAMPANT makes some got! 
time. Tape half of it. 

A socke for 17 year olds C. . 

LONG LONG WAY- Ian Thomas 
(Janus JXS 7005) time 37:15 

Nice period piece. Ian, who had a 
bit of a hit with "Painted Ladies" 
has made a pleasure Poco- 
Barnstorm-Loggins & Messina type 
album that manages to establish 
some sort of fleeting identity. 
However, it's wrapped in such a 
nondescript cover that none of you 
<A/ill buy it. 

A trapped in its medium CK. 



(rNEXr TO THE~POSr OFFICE -^ IN AMHERST/ J) 



Glass exhibition 



A one-man showing of leaded 
stained glass will be presented by 
Patrick J. Curran at Leverett 
Craftsmen & Artists, Leverett, 
Massachusetts, from Sunday, 
August 11 to August 23, 1974. The 
exhibit will consist of varied original 
designs of scenie panels, candle 
lanterns, table shades, and hanging 
lamps, all in leaded stained glass. 
The art of etched glass will be 
displayed by the artist for the first 
time at this exhibit. 



Curran studied at Harbinger 
Studios of Santa Fe, New Mexico, 
under Randal Candea and Mary 
Myers. He also studied the art of 
window restoration under Mr. 
Stephen Schnider of Jacksonville, 
Vermont. Those attending will have 
the opportunity of viewing ex- 
cellent samples of antique Gothic 
and Victorian stained-glass win- 
dows which Curran has carefully 
restored to their original condition. 



For people 
who walk 
the earth . . . 

Shoes, Sandals, Sabots 
and Boots for Men & Women 
trom $23.50 - $42.50 
Brochure Available 




earth 




U 5 »•<•"' Mo 1KA*4' 




264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413) 256-8911 

14 Story St. 
Brattle Arcade 
Cambridge, Mass 02138 
(617) 492-6000 



Our Soft Clog 

U.S. Patent No. 3305947 



Amherst Hours: 

10-5:30, Mon.-Sat., 11-7 p.m., Fri. 




The first "commercial" in radio 
broadcasting only cost $100 for 
10 minutes! 



rnF;(;.\TF:s* * 
irin (•r)i.i.F:(;K 






NORTHAMPTON 



NOW PLAYING 
Blazing Saddles \ 



7:15&9:00 



STARTS WEDNESDAY 



Digby 



MON.-TUES. Dollar Night 
584-8435 



'Your new Hodaica Dealer" 
If 




McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte. 9) 
Hadley, 584-2277 



CYCLE REPAIRS 
All Makes & Models 
Parts & Accessories 




Dealer 
offering 
'Motorcycle PicK-Up Service 



Closest Bike 
Stiop to 
U. Mass 




Car repair hassles? Experienced 
'mechanic will fix it right. No problem lo 
llarge or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
EBab. 2S3-724I. 

tfg-tS 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long. Let us shape and 
maintain your hair through the long 
hot summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers by RK and AMINO PON. 
Your style center. 253-S884. 
Collegetown Unisex. 183 No. Pleasant 
St.. Amherst. Mass. 

tfS-IS 

ROOM WANTED 



RESEARCH 

Send il for <i«ir mail order catalogue, 
complete Kducalional Research 
.Service incl. Term paper research. 
Ihrsis research, etc. <<>l,LEC;iATE 
KKSKAKt II SYSTKMS. IHOO K. Ferry 
Ave.. lildK: Suite 2ft5. Campden. NJ 
tlNMM. Tel. ti09-tt<<2-<i777. :IO.»0« 
KK.SFARCII I'APF.R.SON FII.K. llrs: 
lo-.-> iM-Fi. MM (.S). (12.95 per page. 7 
dav delivery). 

U 



BICYCLES 



Need cycling info? Repairs, renuls. 
sales of all modern bicycles. Pelolon, 1 
East Pleasant St., Amherst Carriage 

Shops. 

tf8-I5 

HELP WANTED 



Would like room w-ditch priv or 2 lidrm 
apt in rural area near .Amherst. Pref l..ev- 
liailley.Srpt. I. ( all .M<Mi42!>.from :i-H p.m. 

tfR-8 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



Desk Clerk— full or part time, starting 
around Aug. 17 thru school year. Apply in 
person, Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge. 
Hadley. 

H-I&K 



Ml'STSELL IMMEDIATELY: '68 t22!> 
I Volvo, (iood condition, green brn. vinyl 
lint.. 4 radial tires. Rest offer. .M6-4M2 
I mornings or dinner time. 

tfg-IS 



Wanted keypunch operators for eves, 
during registration. 12.50 per hour. See 
Larry tiendron. 229 Whitmore or call 545- 

2:ui.'>. 

8-8 



iWANTED 



I want to buy your sick or ailing car, any 
make, any model, any problem, foreign or 
domestic. Call Bob. 253-7241, for fast %%%. 

tf 



POR SALE 



12" speakers, Sansui reverb, Panasonic 
cass. deck, two tuners: Proctor toaster. 
Call Hari. 549-3987, p.ms. 

H-I&8 



HELP WANTED 

I. ah Technician for chemistry 
iMtsitioii in progressive lab days. BS In 
chemistry or microbiology required. 
\«» experience necessary, will train. 
Please contact Annie l^ewallen. Chief 
Medical Technologist. Wing Memorial 
llospiul. Palmer. Mass. l-2R:i-7W>t, 
fXt. HI. 

tf8-l5 






Wooden desk. .Seven drawers, good 

I condition. Must be seen. A nice piece of 

furniture at t.sn. Call Brent at 545-0411 or 

8-8 



\KC Irish .Setter puppies. 7 weeks with 
{shots. Fair prices!! Call 6(i5-3«37. hurry 
I give a puppy a good home! 

8-8 



EXPERIENCED MANAGFR 
WANTED 
Full time employment starting mid 
August. ReUiling, buying, display, 
etc. Apply Emporium India. Carriage 
Shops, Amherst. 

tf8-8 



Vivilar Imaxn l,ens for sale H!>-20Smm. 
Asking lixn. Call Banda .V288I or 2S.V7804. 

U8-I6 



HOUSEMATES WANTED 



Two people wanted to fill 2 bedrooms In 

1 house across from Flo's Diner. Kitchen, 

musical environment, inexpensive. .586- 

1 nxA. 

8-18 



THE DINOSAURS 
ARE HERE! 

The Final performance of New 
Kngland Dinosaur can be seen tonight 
ill N:<m p.m. at Bowker Auditorium. 
1'ickets may be purchased at the box 
office prior to the performance. See 
you at Dinosaur! 





Page M 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AU GUST 8 . 1»74 



Editorials 




Reviews 



l^otes from the underqrad 



The pursuit of happiness 



By E PATR/CK M 

For nearly seven days a steady 
downfall of rain<6lanketed Algief& I 
realized that the heat would be 
impossible 10 bare once it stopped, 
so in a raSh decision I caught the 
next plane out to New york. From 
there I drove a rented Austin-Martin 
into the Berkshires until I arrived in 
Amherst where I had made 
arrangements to meet Frost. 

Well, as to be expected I got 
myself lost, somewhere near the 
campus of the Univeristy of 
Massachusetts I stopped for some 
directions. I pulled up along side of 
a rather obstrusive white structure 
in the guise of a building of some 
artistic quality. I crossed the street 
and came to the base of a long 
winding hill. About half way up a 
young man was engaged in 
pushing a collossal bolder towards 



the top. His face was pressed hard 
against the stone; so hard that it 
itself resembled the stone. 
Forgetting the thought of directions 
I questioned him on his endeavors. 

"Oh," he began resting his back 
to the rock, "I'm a BDIC major in 
Philosophy with special con- 
centration pertaining to the Absurd; 
I'm very interested in the Absurd. 
How about you?" 

"Absurd I certainly am — oh, 
yes, ah, BYOB major in Bac- 
chanalian sciences. But what are 
you doing?" 

"The Philosophy department is 
giving me sixteen credits to push 
this rock to the summit of Orchard 
Hill. Just before I reach the top, it 
rolls back down, almost killing me, 
to the bottom where I begin again." 

"So - ?" 

"So, I'm happy and I laugh." 



"Happy. Are you really happy?" 

"Well, no but for sixteen credits 
it sure beats sitting in a sweaty 
classroom all day. Well, you must 
leave me smiling as I return to my 
rock. Have a good day!" 

Realizing that this fellow had no 
sense of direction, I returned to the 
long white building where I had 
parked my auto. I strolled along the 
virgin corridors wondering hovj 
long it would be before the first 
graffitti artist struck. I suddenly 
came upon a chap sitting cross- 
legged in a corner. "What's up?" I 
querried with some restraint. 

"Just striving to be happy. I used 
to be a philosophy maja, but I 
dropped outta the department. Ya 
know what they wanted me ta do?" 

"I don't want to hear it. I've got 
my own rock." I had the thought of 
departure but I asked, "Are you 



happy?" 

"Oh, yeah - at times, at least I 
think I am. I just sit here and smoke 
my dope all day long. I get so high! 
Let me tell ya all bout it. Like last 
night, wow! Me and the guys on 
the floor had a big smoke- in. Oh, 
everbody was stoned outta his 
mind. It was great. Anyway, I 
mustta had six or seven joints. My 
head was swelled up so big it was 
banging both sides of the corridor 
at the same time. Wow! My head 
rolled off an bounced down the 
stairs, breakin' every bone in my 
face!" 

"That's quite a remarkable 
feat..." 

"No, no — my head and face. 
Anyway, I passed out on the 
carpet. Woke up later on and 
crawled ta my bunk. Got up and 
pulled back the covers when I 



Clouds of dissention gathering 



by John Bonner 

The clouds of worldwide 
dissention, discrimination and 
dissatisfaction can be seen hanging 
over our society just as the clouds 
that are seen before a severe 
thunderstorm or hurricane ap- 
proaches. 

Those clouds are gathering for 
the purpose of motivating the 
natural growth of a somewhat 
stunned world of equality and 
justice. 

The elements of these clouds 
that are gathering may be regarded 
by those obessed with the corrupt 
sunlight of today as a threat to the 
well being of the world they 
coldheartedly control. 

Nature has a way of taking care 
of itself and the world has to fell 
that the motive of Black people 
allow them to continue to exist as 
they have for the past three cen- 
turies. 

The oppressed Black forces of 
the world are now saying "no 
more" to their opressors. They are 
the dark clouds in the sky, 
threatening to wash away all within 
the oppressive white system with 
the righteous rain of revolution. 

Those same clouds of dissention 
gathering over the ghettoes of 
America are also gathering within 
the boundaries of the mother 
country of Africa. Those same 
clouds are gathering over the Arab 
countries in the Middle East. All the 
clouds that for generations and 
generations have been suppressed 
by the scorching corrupt sunlight of 
the present day world are gathering 
with forbidden force and waiting. 

We can see the clouds increasing 
in darkness and volume as the 
bright sunlight of today exposes the 
crookedness, corruption, op- 
pression, mental slavery and 
materialism that still remains in 
existence despite the fact that 
some feel the oppressed people 
have come a long way. And many 
also feel the oppressor has changed 
now, that he is not what he used to 
be. 

The raindrops, the scattered 
raindrops of revolution are falling 
over the oppressed Black world 
saying a simple, "no, you must not 
hold us back any longer." The 
raindrops are falling as a result of 
the tears and the sweat that Black 
people and all other oppressed 
people have had to hold back, to 
restrain for all these years. 

Now as the raindrops of our 
emotions fall free, they will not — 
they must not, fall in vain nor must 
they fall to increase or stimulate the 
growth of further corruption and 
oppression in this world. They must 
have the "equality" embedded into 
them to erase all oppression 
everywhere, not just in the ghetto. 



but in Maza.iibique — in Zaire — in 
South Africa - in the prisons that 
house only "Black" people, 
everywhere that slavery and op- 
pression exist. The raindrops of our 
revolution must have the for- 
cefulness of the mightiest 
hurricane, and be just as persistent 
in their determination to survive, 
despite the obstacles that are thrust 
in their path. 

While there will be many who say 
those clouds that are forming over 
the world mean nothing, those 
people are the ones who are 
blinded by the superficial sunlight 
of today and cannot see that the 
victims of oppression are the ones 
destined to wash away these 
conditions with the generation of 
restrained tears and sweat from our 
Black bodies. 

There will be those that will 
ignore the gathering of the clouds 
of dissention and will attempt to 
persuade us into believing their 
forecast that if is not "scien- 
tifically" possible for raindrops of 
revolution to fall from the world- 
wide clouds of dissention. They do 
not realize that these actions will 
not be based on "scientifics" but 
on socialism, incoitability, and the 
principle that "you can't keep all 
the people down all the time." And 
adding more strength to this is their 
"scienGe" that stated, "for every 
action there is an equal or opposite 
reaction." 

Those clouds of dissention now 
scattered over the wold have 
become more recognizable, and 
more threatening. The next phase 
will be the "thunder stage," when 
we begin to hear the distant 
thunder of revolution. 

It is not a coincidence that the 
"brothers" who are behind the 
white man's bars and prisons are 
rebelling; it is not a coincidence that 
the Black soldiers in the white 



Caustic comments 



man's army are rebelling against 
the white man's wars. These are 
not coincidences. This is a 
manifestation of that "Distant 
Thunder" that will bring the 
raindrops of revolution to the 
oppressed world. That thunder will 
become lightning striking out the 



injustice. Those raindrops will 
become the mightiest hurricane, 
with freedom - the need to be free 
- as its core. 

One day the distant thunder will 
not be distant, it will be now - real 
reactionary and necessary for our 
survival. 



passed out again and caught the 
back of my head on the metal bed 
rails as I fell. So cool man. Next 
day, this mornin, I woke up and 
puked my guts out — Wow, 
whaddya think?" 

"I certainly wish that I could feel 
that good every day." 

"That's nothin, man, I got no 
responsibility. The biggest decision 
I gutta make in my life is when I get 
up in the morning and I have to 
decide whether to \r jve a joint, or a 
bong, or a pipe. 

"Do you work at all?" 

"I can't man. I burned off the tips 
of my fingers on the roaches. In a 
way, I kinda work sellin this stuff. 
Ya see, somebody sells it ta Charlie 
for 200 and he sells it ta Jose for 
250, calling it Columbian. Well, I 
buy it from him at about, oh, maybe 
350 and sell it for 400 — ha — some 
horse laid it in California for 
nuthin'!. Everybody's a chisler, 
man, but we're all happy!" 

He began to light another joint 
when the sounds of sirens suddenly 
interrupted him. He scraped up all 
his belongings and made for a hasty 
retreat. "What's wrong?" I called 
out to him ""Oh, I forgot to tell you. 
In this country, happiness is 
illegal!" 




The Spanish American Community of Northampton celebrated last Sunday 
their third annual festival. 

Seven bands from Springfield, Pittsfield, Westfield and Northampton par- 
ticipated in the Fiesta. 

Police, firemen and the Hampshire correctional police participated in the 
parade. 

The parade was led by a police car followed by two local Puerto Rican 
residents carrying the flags of the U. S. and Puerto Rico. 

A large number of speakers aadressed the crowd, among them Represen- 
tative Collins, ( D - Amherst) and Congressman Silvio O. Conte (R-Mass.), who spoke 
in Spanish. 

The Spanish American Fiesta is a cultural activity of the Spanish speaking 
residents in the area, mostly Puerto Ricans. photo bv Ed coh«, 



Clapton's songs sing themselves 



By MIKE KOSTEK 

Bingo The Whisjjers (Janus 
JXS-7006) time If you take your 
soul sweet sweet sweet, try some 
of this standstill moompa. 

A 'Dick Tracy wethead-Dick 
Tracy drylook' C. 

461 Ocean Boulevard-Eric 
Clapton (RSO SO 5801) time 39:43 

At last the young and the dumb 
will be able to spell 'boulevard', 
thanks to the quietly humble quitar 
maestro, Mssr. Clapton and the 
Fate that blew the ex-junkie to the 



posh (Port Out, Starboard Home) 
Florida retreat. 

Retreat? Neva! You know Eric by 
now, and you like him a lot and all 
that, but I don't quite think you'll 
find him charging enough on here, 
and you won't be able to swim in 
this album the way you swam in 
LAYLA for days and months (even 
the Top 40 lame-o's who got wind 
through the year later hit single 
success; LAYLA is out now as a 
$7.98 list pricer ($5.29 in good 
record stores), and that, podnuh, is 



a steal and a deal). 

There's no Duane Allmano to fire 
Eric along, and the arrangements 
are on the plain side. Eric really lets 
the songs sing themselves; his 
usual procedure is to take 
something like "Willie And The 
Hand Jive", tuck in the raw soul 
ends and roll the song up in lit- 
tleballs of light English feel that take 
patience to really suss. Very nice if 
you like to take the time, but don't 
expect much "Badge" gut- 
grabbing. "I Shot The Sheriff" is a 



good low-key to it all. 

A tastefully polished B. Small 
Talk-Sly £f The Family Stone (Epic 
PE 32930) time 37:07 

I know it. Every 12 months or so 
you've been going down to the 
record store to buy something 
that's well, admit it, goofy (goofie), 
and what you did first (1972 style) 
was THERE'S A RIOT COIN' ON, 
and '73 reeled FRESH onto you. 
Que sera sera, you ask for more In 
1974 and get what? SMALL TALK. 
(Continued on P. 11) 



Land set aside for regional vet college 



Governor Francis W. Sargent has signed a 
bill setting aside 1100 acres in Grafton for a 
proposed regional veterinary college. 

Three other New England states, however, 
must agree to participate in the regional 
school within three years. 

UMass students have been particularly 
vocal in their demands for a veterinary 
school. There are no such schools in New 
England and area students encounter ex- 
treme difficulty being accepted to another 
state's school. 

This year, four of 18 UMass students were 
accepted to veterinary colleges. These four 
average cumulative average was 3.8. 



The New England governors will be told 
soon that the cost of construction for a 
veterinary school will be between $31 .5 
million and $35 million. These figures 
represent the maximum cost if the school is 
built by 1978. 

If population is the assessment formula 
used and all six New England states agree to 
participate. Conn, would pay 25.6 per cent; 
Maine, 8.4 per cent; Rhode Island, 8 per cent; 
New Hampshire, 6.2 per cent; and Vermont, 
3.4 per cent. 

Alan D. Ferguson, executive director of 
the New England Board of Higher Education 
which made the construction study, said 



population would not necessarily be the only 
determinant in assessing states for the 
proposed school's costs. He said a formula 
might be worked out reflecting a state's need 
for veterinarians. 

Besides Mass., Ferguson said Conn, and 
Rhode Island will probably participate in the 
venture but the intentions of the other states 
are not yet certain. 

The plan to establish a regional veterinary 
college directly contradicts recom- 
mendations made in June by the New 
England Land Grant University Presidents. 
The presidents recommended that the New 
England states, rather, contract for spaces in 



existing veterinary colleges. 

Dr. Ben R. Forsyth, Associate Dean of the 
University of Vermont Division of Health 
Sciences and chairman of the task force, said 
their studies indicate, "the most economical 
and efficient way to meet New England's 
veterinary medicine needs could be a 
combination of contracts for veterinary 
training coupled with clinical experience 
placement in New England institutions ..." 

Forsyth said there are "exciting 
possibilities for new approaches to veterinary 
medical education that ought to be explored 
before the region commits itself to an ex- 
tensive new facility." 



The Summer 



Vol. 1 No. 9 




recyclable 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



Task Force reviewing UlVIass; 
may recommend program changes 



By MIKE KNEELAND 
Establishing the goals of the 
University, followed by a 
systematic review of its depart- 
ments, is the goal of the newly 
established Program Review Task 
Force. 

"It's a very important committee, 
I think," said the program's 
chairman, associate provost David 
Bischoff. There are 19 members on 
the committee and they will 
recommend to administration 
officials "what the University 
should be" according to Bischoff. 
After this general framework has 
been established, the task force will 
then "pay close attention to the 



programs they consider wanting," 
said Bischoff. 

This means various departments 
or department components may be 
either eliminated or changed to fit 
the framework of the University. 

"Inevitabley," warns the 
associate provost, "hard decisions 
will have to be made by the ad- 
ministration. The University can't 
be what everyone wants it to be." 

Bischoff says the root of the 
issue, perhaps, lies during the 1960s 
when Universities, including 
UMass, werie growing at a fast rate 
"never thinking about stopping." 

During this growth period some 
departments said they needed 



U Mies' reaction to 
Nixon's resignation 



By RUDOLPH JONES 

Richard Milhous Nixon resigned 
the office of the Presidency on 
Friday Aug. 9 at noon, making him 
the first President in the nearly 200 
year history of the U.S. that a 
President has done so. 

The President said that he "felt a 
very personal sense of kinship with 
each and every American" and 
ended his 15 minute speech "with 
this prayer: May God's grace be 
with you in all the days ahead". 

World peace is what I hoped to 
achieve when I sought the 
presidency. This, more than 
anything is what I hope will be my 
legacy to you, ta our country. 

Politicians, scholars, lawyers, 
students and laymen rejoyed at the 
President decision with the notion 
that it was in the best interest of the 
country. 

Here at the university residerits 
seemed to feel a sense of ac- 
complishment and satisfaction of 
judgement to the fact that it was 
the only state in the nation to vote 
against the re-election of Richard 
Nixon. 

Speaking with a number of 
students here at the University, this 
reporter solicitated the following 
responses from students to the 
Presidents resignation. 

"I am not overjoyed by the fact 
that a very strong man is destroyed, 
but the nation's business was being 
diverted to the "problems"of 
Watergate". The occurances as far 



as Watergate is concerned is not 
new to the office of the Presidency. 
Bugging, etc. was not introduced 
by Richard Nixon. Look at the 
distruction of the radical 
organizations in this country. This 
resulted from policies similar to 
Watergate. I am very delighted that 
this personal attachment of 
corruption in government in terms 
of Richard Nixon will assume less 
importance in the News. I maintain 
that corruption in government was 
not introduced by Richard Nixon 
and will not end with Richard 
Nixon's departure from office. 

Another student had this 
response: "I am happy that Richard 
Nixon has resigned, but I am very 
disturbed with Gerald Ford being 
that he is more conservative than 
Nixon." 

Another student: "I am very 
sympathetic with the man and his 
family. He is just a victim of this 
monstrocity of the Presidency. 

Another student said: "I am from 
Massachusetts, and I am very 
proud that we knew from the start 
that Nixon couldn't be trusted with 
so much power. That's why we 
were the only state in the Union to 
vote against Richard Nixon's re- 
election." 

Richard Nixon has resigned. 
General Ford ascended to the office 
of the Presidency, all we can hope 
for is that the problems affecting 
the nation can be resolved. 



various positions to comply with 
their particular visions. That may no 
longer be possible since it may no 
longer fit into the general scheme 
of the University. 

Bischoff noted that students' 
educational goals and emphasis 
have not remained constant over 
the years. 

During the Sputnik era, he said, 
students were concerned with the 
sciences. Later, students had more 
humanistic concerns and now, 
students are interested in 
vocational type education, Bischoff 
said. 

The task force, therefore, will 
make suggestions on what 
programs should be maintained and 
are "central for the University to 
have," Bischoff told the Solstice 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Bischoff said it's importaat the 
UMass community know this 
review is taking place, to act as a 
feedback to the committee. 

# 

He says the committee is 
composed of very high quality 
members. Included in its mem- 
bership are two deans and two 
department heads. 

Bischoff said his committee's 
recommendations will not be too 
specific, but will perhaps let the 
faculty senate work out any 
changes 



,»j*.':;"'. '.^^^^la^j 



o 




DEAN BISCHOFF: Hard decisions ahead? 



Japanese students visit here 



A group of 133 Japanese from Hokkaido, the 
country's northernmost province, left the University 
yesterday after a four— day visit. 

The group, known as the Hckkaido Youth Overseas 
Training Project, includes eight adult leaders and 125 
young Japanese who are engaged in agriculture, 
fisheries, government, industry, education and 
community service. 

Every two years, a Hokkaido youth group spends 
one month visiting various parts of the United States. 
The first group of young Japanese visisted the 
Amherst campus in 1968. 

The Overseas Training Project was established by 
the late Dr. Harusada Suginome, Hokkaido University 
president emeritus who received an honorary degree 
from U Mass in 1967 and who led the first Hokkaido 
group to the U.S. in 1968. 

U Mass has had a long relationship with Hokkaido, 
dating from 1876, when Emperpr Meiji of Japan in- 



vited the third president of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, William S. Clark, to assist in 
organizing and administering an agricultural college in 
Sapporo. In the years following the establishment of 
Sapporo Agricultural College, now Hokkaido 
University, several members of Clark's faculty served 
at Sapporo. One of them. Professor William Wheeler, 
became president of the Japanese agricultural college. 

• 

From 1958 to 1962, U Mass, under a contract with 
the U.S. State Department, assisted in strengthening 
the agricultural curricula at Hokkaido University. 
During this period, 11 U Mass faculty members from 
the College of Food and Natural Resources served at 
Hokkaido and 52 Japanese professors and students 
received advanced training at the Amherst campus. 

More information about the visitors may be ob- 
tained from Gilbert E. Mottia, Judson Haverkamp, or 
John Maki, all at U Mass, and all members of the 
Program Planning Committee. 




TMP SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1$, 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, i974 



i :i. ^ imi j^e»«. w » t-KiM. « *j u i 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 3 



|»Mill>»i l I 11. « ■! *-JWt " 



J _aj '^e3etffgr'j.t - * i.iu ' . ' !-H-gs Jig^= 



iRowdy Bunch and Flunkies 
[winners as IM Season ends 

The 1974 Summer Intramural Sports Program has ended \A^ith the 

following results and summaries: 

Vol/eybat/ 
Men's Division Champs - The Gunners Co-Rec Division Champs - The 

Bound 

Softba// 
Men's Division Champs - Frank's Flunkies Co-Rec Division Champs - 
Rowdy Bunch 

Men 's Play-off Results 



IM participants in bike race — revin' up with two on the 
ground and two in the air. Photo bv jim canoi» 

Superbowl of music 

Drum and bugle corps 
battle next Saturday 



The Third Annual Superbowl of 
Music, champiortship drum and 
bugle corfjs competition, will be 
dedicated to the late Judge Sannuel 
Blassberg for his service to his 
fellow man, and especially for his 
work with Springfield Bishop 
Christopher Weldon as honorary 
chairmen of the first two Super- 
bowls of Music. 

The Judge Samuel Blassberg 
Memorial Trophy will be presented 
to the first place drum and bugle 
corfjs at the Sup>erbowl Saturday, 
August 24, at the UMass Alumni 
Stadium. Proceeds from the 
competition will be used to benefit 
residents of Belchortown State 
School. 

Groups which will compete are: 
The Skyliners from New York City, 
The Hurricanes from Connecticut, 
The Matadors from Rhode Island, 
The Sunrisers from Long Island, 
and the Westshoremen Bonnie 
Scots from Pennsylvania. 

Also featured in special 
exhibition will be: The Centurions 
from Connecticut, The St. George 
Olympians from Springfield, and 
the Mounties from Mount Carmel, 
Pennsylvania. 

Judge Blassberg, who died 
February 18, 1974, was born 
December 22, 1903 in Turners Falls, 
Mass. He retired as presiding justice 
of the Franklin County District 
Court Dec. 22, 1973, after 37 years 
on the bench. Throughout a long 
and distinguished career, he was a 
leader in philanthropic, civic and 
fraternal affairs in Franklin County. 
Blassberg was a member of the 



THE SUMMER 



Massachusetts Bar Assn., and the 
Franklin County Bar Assn., and a 
Trustee of the Greenfield Savings 
Bank. He served as president and 
campaign chairman of the United 
Fund of Franklin County, president 
of the Greenfield YMCA, a director 
of the Springfield Jewish Home for 
the Aged, chairman of the 
executive committee of the Franklin 
County Big Brother Association, 
and chairman of the Advisory 
Board of the Greenfield Salvation 
Army. 

The competition will begin at 
7:30 p.m. following about an hour 
of special entertainment by TUSK, 
in the 20,000-seat Alumni Stadium. 
Honorary chairmen of the 
Superbowl Committee are Bishop 
Christopher Weldon of Springfield 
and Randolph Bromery, chancellor 
of the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst. Co-chairmen are Dr. 
Benjamin Ricci, president of the 
Belchertown State School Friends 
Association and Dr. William 
Venman, UMass director of 
Continuing Education. 

The Belchertown State School 
Friends Association, a group 
dedicated to the improvement of 
the environment for mentally 
retarded residents at Belchertown, 
will apply the proceeds to this 
cause. Advance reservations may 
be made with George Como, Ticket 
Office, Boyden Building, UMass at 
Amherst. In case of rain August 24, 
the program will be the following 
day, Sunday, at 1:30 p.m. 




EDITORS 



Michael D. Kneeland 



Rudolph F. Jones 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Brent Wilkes 



PHOTO EDITOR 
AD LAYOUT 



Steve Ruggies 
Betsy T. Wilkes 



Summer newspaper of the University of Massachusetts The 
staff IS responsible for its content and no faculty member or ad 
min:strators read it for accuracy or approval prior to publication. 

Unsigned editorials represent the view of this paper They do not 
necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration or 
student body as a whole. Signed editorials, columns, reviews 
rartoons and letters represent the personal views of fhr ujfhors! 

OFFICE: 422 S.U. 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 830 a.m. - 4:30 

p.m. 



Plumbers 



DP 214 



> 



DD 214 



^ 



Worms 



Worms 



Over the Hill 



> 



Worms 



\ Frank's Flunkies 



Pl'inkies 



Sissies 



Frank's Flu nkies 



prank's FlunkJes 



Pit>efitters 



Education 



Education 



Tennis 
Men's Division Champions - G. Wood and Eric Nagel 
Women's Division Champion - Francine Hardaway 
Women's Division Runner-up - Trina Hosmer 



Mixed Doubles Champion — 

John and hrancine Hardaway 
Mixed Doubles Runner-up — 

Steven Marantz and Anne Reilly 



Badminton Squash Paddleball 

Men's Champion - Steve Mosher Men's Champion - J. Sikoski Men s Champion - J. Sikoski 

Women's Champion - Cynthia Adams Women's Champion - Sue Birrell" 

The entire Summer Intramural staff wishes to thank all students, 
faculty, and staff who participated in the intramural sports program this 
summer. A complete program is also available in the Fall. If anyone has any 
suggestions o' comments concerning the summer program, contact the 
Intramural office at 545-2693, Room 215 Boyden Building. 




There's more 
to a bicycle 

than the name 

on the frame. 



The Rowdy Bunch — 1974 co-rec league Softball champions. 

Top row (l-r): Billy McGaughey, Bob Spadoni, Jackie 
Walsh, Tony Murgo, Charlotte Braun, Ray Pion, Russ Zub. 
Botton row (l-r): Nancy Pinto, Sue Slansky, Michael 




Shekel, Karen Lindquist, Sandy Anderson. jZ^pbuiI 



See your specialists with: 

Rentals 

24 Hour Repair Service 
Sales, New & Used 
Touring & Racing Accessories 
Personal Attention to all Cycling 
needs 




f^khkti 



nn 



1 E. Pleasant St. 
Amherst 
349-6904 




Growing syphilis is profs goa 




By M/KE KNEELAND 
A UMass microbiologist is at- 
tempting to do something that has 
never been done — grow syphilis in 
a test tube. 

Dr. CD. Cox, who is working 
with a $120,000-plus federal grant, 
says that if he and his assistants 
could grow the syphilis, then they 
could study how it produces 
disease. 

Cox has made some new 
assumptions about the bacterium. 
The textbooks, presently, say - 
the syphilis bacterium — 
Treponema pallidum — is an 
anaerobe, meaning it grows 
without free oxygen. 

After studying for three months 
at a library in Washington, D.C., 
Cox concluded the evidence 
supporting that theory was weak. 
Writing in the journal Infection 
and Immunity, Cox and associate 
Miriam K. Barber claimed their 
experiments show the syphilis 
organism does consume oxygen, 
similar to related bacteria that are 
aerobic, or able to grow and 
reproduce in the presence of 
oxygen. 

Cox said he has received many 
letters from fellow scientists, 
mostly congratulating his work and 
initial findings. 

One possible result of Cox's 
experiment could be the 



Dr. C. D. Cox. 



Stmff Photo 



development of a syphilis vaccine 
to help curb the disease's epidemic 
proportions. 

He says he is not concerned with 
the social questions of syphilis. He 
notes, however, that even if such a 
vaccine were developed 10 years 
ago, it would have done little good 
since many people would not have 
admitted they might ever be ex- 
posed to syphilis. 

Now that Cox's work has 
become "public," other researchers 
will also try to grow the bacteria. 
For obvious reasons, phar- 
maceutical firms are also interested 
in the experiments. 

With an increase in pressure to 
successfully perform the ex- 
periment, and some positive find- 
ings. Cox has now involved 
graduate students here in the 
project. He feels they might also 
gain from participating in the 
project. 

Cox is doing his research using 
rabbits, which can present a 
problem. Rabbits have their own 
strain of syphilis which look like the 
human strain under the 
microscope. This means Cox and 
his assistants must take measures 
not to confuse the two strains. 

Cox says there is much more to 
be learned about syphilis. "We 
don't know whether there's one 
strain of syphilis or not ... or 



whether immunization to one 
would give immunization to the 
other." 

Cox is a former head of the 
UMass department of 

microbiology. He has been here 12 
years. 




staff Pnoto 

Assistant Miriam Barber 
(I) and Ellen Collins 
working in lab. 



hmm 



Exec, secretary seminars 

— Seminars for non-financial executives and executive secretaries and 
administrative assistants are scheduled for September at the Univeristy of 
Massachusetts- Amherst School of Bussness Administration. 

The three-day seminar on Finance and Accounting, for non-financial 
executives, will be Sept. 4, 5, and 6; and the three-day session on Ad- 
vanced Orientation for Executive Secretaries and Administrative 
Assistants will be Sept. 18, 19, and 20. Both are offered by the UMass 
School of Business Administration and the Division of Continuing 
Education. 

Fundamentals of balance sheets, income statements, funds flow 
concepts, and other aspects of finance will be discussed during the first 
seminar. Faculty members will be Peter C. Briant, director of the McGill 
University School of Commerce, and Dale L. Kiefer, accounting professor 
at the University of Cincinnati. 

The seminar for executive secretaries and administrative assistants 
will work toward answering the question: "What does the experienced 
executive secretary and administrative assistant have to know about 
management tasks, practices and responsibilities to function more ef- 
fectively?" Faculty members for this session will be: Billie Jo Morland, 
executive assistant to the dean of the College of General Studies, George 
Washington University; Beverly Ann Sincavage, administrative assistant to 
the vice president-Regulatory Affairs & Council and corporate secretary of 
TRT Telecommunications Corporation. 

Also, Carol Ann Asooiani, administrative assistant to the director of 
special education programs, Howard University, and Jo Ann Dover, North 
Virginia area consultant for Trans-Americard Corporation. 

Further information on both seminars may be obtained from Con- 
tinuing Education, 920 Campus Center, or from Dr. Bertil Liander at the 
UM'iss School of Business. 




While most Umies are enjoying the likes of Cape Cod, and Va. Beach, student Ralph Saczawa (r) is in 
summer camp at Ford Bragg, N. C. learning fundamental artillery training. He is an Army ROTC student here. 



STEAI\ 
OUT- # • 

Summer 

Entertainment 
Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
& Sat. 

HAPPY HOUR 

4:30-7:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY, MONDAY ft 
TUESDAY ^-^- 

Includes Salad Bar ^^w' 

STEAr 
€UT» # ■ 

Corner University Drive and 
Route 9 



TUTOR POSITIONS 



Paid Tutors Needed 



Graduate and undergraduate students at the 
junior and senior levels are needed to tutor UMass 
students this fall. Students with majors in the 
following academic areas are encouraged to apply. 



Matti & statistics 

Business 

Chemistry 

Zoology 

Botany 

Astronomy 



Geology 


Sociology 


Human Development 


Psychology 


Engineering 


Anthropology « 


French 


History 


Spanish 


Public Health 


Latin 


Nursing 


English 





Pay Rate: $3.00 per hour 
Hours: 10 ■ 15 per week 




OLP 

weiRP 

HAROIPS 



Applications are available in Rm. 214, New Africa 
House. Interested students may also contact Carol 
Maranda or Tim Knowles at 545-0031. 



New Location: 
65 University Drive - next to Bells Pizza 

NEW and USED Clothing featuring the lowest prices 

• in town | 

.Used jeans, denim jackets, leather jackets, western ^ 
shirts, much more ... 
New Landlubber Western shirts 

• Male UFO & Viceroy Jeans 
PLUS recycled denim skirts, long and short 

253-5291 

Open /Vtonday Saturday, 10 6 
Friday Nite,till9 



» m^ M- •ti 



Page 4 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



Greenfield College opens 



Greenfield Community College 
will begin its fall semester on 
September 30 in its new Greenfield 
Meadows campus. 

The new facility, which has taken 
11 years to plan and build at a total 
cost of $16 million, will open 
without complete furnishings and 
equipment, however. After a 
variety of administrative and 
funding problems, the new 
equipment and furnishings have 
finally reached the bidding stage 
but will probably not be installed 
until late fall or early winter. 

The temporary facilities, which 
the college has occupied since its 



founding 12 years ago, contain 
90,000 square feet of space. The 
new facility contains 225,000 
square feet; some areas, par- 
ticularly the faculty-student 
modules, will be without fur- 
nishings for the time being. The 
library will also lack for the moment 
sufficient shelf space, study tables, 
carrells and lounge furniture. 

John Pride, the college car- 
penter, has fabricated temporary 
lab tables out of reinforced 
plywood and sawhorses. Tem- 
porary sinks have been purchased 
so that chemistry courses may be 
held. Other instructional and ad- 



ministrative areas will also have to 
make-do with temporary 
arrangements until new furnishings 
are finally installed. 

Among the new features of the 
Greenfield Meadows campus will 
be 24 hour security guards. Ac- 
cording to Charles Carter, director 
of physical plant for the college, no 
one will have a key to the building. 
Instead, authorized after-hours 
visitors will have to sign in with 
security guards stationed in the 
building. The guards will be linked 
to a main security station by two- 
way portable radios. 

Another new feature of the 



ip^^^ 



Steak Sr'Brcw Presents 



stBaRSBreu? 

■•MflM tl iharplr rWif Mfli 

vt tew ailti a aiU tofinct thargi 

«lli#pwpinw 

tar BMT.VlMtrlaigria* 

witkilutf. 

MiMT iMliiiM an tte i^aA 7M MB BAkt. 

A Isckei of ShriDp 

ji: ;ii. 15 ¥ liui.. :i.:i t .tzv- wliu 

liked SiBfltd Cliss 

frtttch Onion Soup 




lonelKS Sirlom Sttik. N.T. Cat 

looelessSirlotnSteik. NT. Coi-Lir(t 
lone In Sirloin Steak -Beivj Cot . 

Sliced Sirloin Steik 

lee! Irochettc f lib lice 

ill! Sprin* Chicken. Iroiled or Terijiki 

SteikbnrSer on 1 Seeded Ion 

Ckieubirjer 

loitt hue libs if leef 

rUit Mi(iii 
Iroilid fill' Skriiy 
Filit Miliii ui r 

• liltiuiliiiCiini. 

Iikii fiUtt. 
rniek rhii 
Cin II tki 

SutNi ll 

leiCnii 

■it It ClffN 



m Steak *3.95 

(HNilESS SmWI NT C«T) lEHLUlY $4. II 



MON- Steak 

(HNilESS SmiM NT C«T) 

Tiir. Roast Prime *4.25 
Ribs of Beef «'"•'"»•» 

m'SrMed $4.95 
Shtinp iEMuiit$5i5 

THURS''^e Fea5f "^5.95 

Somelhinn lEMlMlY $1.15 

For Every Tagte — 
Filet Mignon, ¥i Chicken, Broiled Shrimp, Share it — 
Only $1.95 Extra! 

Plo», of course, all the salad you con make. 

SteahE-BreiD 

The Greatest Eating A Drinking Public Houee Ev 



SOUTH HADLET 

1 , 489 Oranby Road 
(413) 536-3100 



"^. 



^^t ->. )„hJr*^t.M 



"Your new Hodaka Dealer" 




McCambridge 

206 Russell St., 

(Rte. 9) 
Hadley, 584-2277 



CYCLE REPAIRS 
All Make« & Models 
Parts & Accessories 




Dealer 
offering 
'Motorcycle Pick Up Service 



Closest Bike 
Shop to 
U. Mass 



Greenfield Meadows campus will 
be a college cafeteria operated by 
Saga Foods. Food service in the old 
facility was handled by vending 
machines. College students were 
also welcome to purchase a noon 
meal at the cafeteria in the main 
building operated by Greenfield 
public schools for Davis Street and 
Federal South schools. 

Handicapped students will find 
specially designed lavatory facilities 
and elevator service. 

Faculty members, each of whom 
will have a private office, will return 
almost a month before their 
students. This will give them time 
to unpack their books and get 
settled in before classes begin. A 
special orientation program in 
September is being planned by the 
office of student personnel services 
to acquaint students with the new 
facility and other aspects of college 
life. 

There will be several additions to 
the faculty this fall. A new dean of 
students, Clement J. Gainty, began 
his duties July 1. Gair.iy had 
previously been associate dean of 
students at North Country Com- 
munity College. Peter M. Stoddard 
has been appointed college 
registrar. A graduate of Utica 
College, Stoddard was previously a 
systems engineer for Wing 
Memorial Hospital in Palmer. From 
1967 to 1971 he was employed at 
the Franklin County Public Hospital 
in special research projects. He is a 
candidate for the degree of master 
of business administration at 
Western New England College. 

Mary K. Giles will join the nursing 
faculty. She received a masters 
degree in nursing from New York 
University and has served on the 
Nursing faculties at the University 
of Massachusetts and the 
University of South Carolina. From 
1966 to 1969 she was associated 
with the Agency for International 
Development as a nursing advisor. 
John J. Howard will join the data 
processing faculty, he is also a 
doctoral candidate at the University 
of Massachusetts and was 
previously a member of the faculty 
at Western New England College. 
From 1963 to 1965 he was 
associated with General Electric in 
systems and data processing. 

Greenfield Community College is 
still accepting applications for the 
fall semester. In addition to liberal 
arts, the college offers associate 
degree programs in art, civil 
engineering technology, com- 
munity mental health technology, 
data processing technology, early 
childhood education, en- 
vironmental science, fire science 



technology, graphic design, law 
enforcement, management, 
marketing, media technology] 
nursing, recreation leadership an 
secretarial science. 

Of special interest to veterans is 
recent legislation which extends 
veterans eligibility to use their Gl 
Bill educational entitlement from 
eight to ten years. According to 
GCC's director of veterans' affairs, 
Tom King, "Those veterans who 
were delimited from using 
remaining educational entitlement 
as of July 1, 1974, now have until 
June 1, 1976 to use any remaining 
entitlement." During the past 
academic year, Greenfield Com- 
munity College had approximately 
240 veterans enrolled. 

In addition to its regular day 
division courses, Greenfield 
Community College offers a wide 
variety of evening credit courses. 
Those being offered this fall are: 
Monday: Photography 1, In- 
troduction to Audiovisual Media, 
Introduction to marketing, The 
American Dream: promises and 
practices, principles of psychology, 
psychology of adjustment, ab- 
normal phychology and oral 
communication. 

Tuesday: Intermediate ac- 
counting I, English Composition 1; 
Structures in composition, English 
composition II, Exploring literature, 
American folklore, police 
procedures, child psychology, 
group discussion and creative 
experiences in art, music and drama 
for the young child. 
Wednesday: Production of 
audiovisual materials, zoology - 
lecture, data processing systems, 
principles of economics 1, law and 
society, fundamental concepts of 
mathematics and typewriting 
development 1. 

Thursday: Introduction to ac- 
counting 1, laboratory, the 
evolution of modern Asian 
societies, leadership skills and the 
professional nurse, American 
politics, typewriting development 
11, principles of sociology and 
social problems. 

To register in person, the college 
will be open on the following nights 
from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.- Monday, 
September 23 through Thursday, 
September 26. Classes begin on 
Monday, September 30. 

The move to the new campus 
has necessitated the addition of 15 
maintenance personnel to the 
college staff including a painter, 
electrician, system control 
specialist, refrigerating and heating 
technician, utility plant operator an 
dinstitutional foreman. 




The 
Rusty Nail Inn 



presents 



TOMTE 



LUTHER JOHNSON 



FHIDW 



Bill Colwell 



SAT. & SI \ 



Good Friend Coyotie 



MONDAY 



Orphan Annie 



* * 



TUES. & VV KI). 

Mitch Chakour 

and 

Mission Band 



Rte. 47, Sunderland 665-4937 

Take Rte. 1 16 north, take left after Tennis Academy and 
follow to end. Take another left. 200 yards and youre there! 



^^^^'^^^^^m&mmmim-^^^^^^^ 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1?74 



Issues statement 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 5 



John Olver up for re-election 



For two years I have had the 
honor and the privilege of serving 
the people of the Franklin, Hamp- 
shire, and Hampden District as their 
state senator. I am announcing 
formally my candidacy for re- 
election. 

This occasion is an opportunity 
to review my involvement as your 
state senator with some of the 
efforts to meet the needs of the 
people of the Franklin Hampshire 
District and the Commonwealth, 
and to look foward to the tasks 
which will require our attention 
during the next two years. 

Together, we in the Franklin 
Hampshire District has pursued 
needed public facilities. We are 
about to see many of our efforts 
come to fruition: 

— The former campus of the 
Northampton School for Girls is 
being converted to a regional 
center for mental health and 
children's services; 

— Funds are available to the 
Department of Natural Resources 
to acquire and protect the Holyoke 
Range; 

— Franklin County has become a 
separate state region with a county- 
wide housing authority and a home- 
care corporation to meet the needs 
of the elderly; 

— A new, fully equipped and 
fully staffed campus of the 
Greenfield Community College will 
open in the fall; 

— A public skating rink for the 
people has been funded. 

These projects required 
legislative efforts, along with the 
many, many other issues whk:h 
came before the General Court — 
which are too numerous to 
categorize in a few minutes. I would 
like, however, to mention a few 
ateas where I have been particularly 
active. 

The Special Legislative Com- 
mission on Facilities for the 
Mentally Retarded has: 

— Rewritten the laws setting 
standards of competancy for 
physicians in state service; 

— Forced the Department of 
Mental Health to adopt many new 
regulations to improve conditions 
for residents at facilities such as 
Belchertown; 

— Insisted on the Com- 
monwealth's participation in the 
Title XIX Medicaid program, which 
will mean millions of new federal 
dollars for state services for the 
mentally retarded. 

I have been privileged to serve as 
chairman of the commission during 
the term of these accomplishments. 




The assessment ot the costs of 
county government has been 
reapportioned. State aid to the 
cities and towns has been in- 
creased. I am hopeful these 
changes can be translated into 
property tax relief for the city of 
Northampton and the towns of the 
Franklin Hampshire District. 

As vice chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Natural Resources I 
labored over the reqrganization of 
the Secretariat of Enviromental 
Affairs to give the Commonwealth 
a modern agency capable of 
protecting the environment; and I 
have sponsored a variety of 
measures designed to protect the 
water resources of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Looking now to the future, the 
areas wher.e I propose to make 
particular efforts are: 

— Establishing clear ethical 
standards for those in public life 
and taking positive action on public 
campaign financing; 

— Strengthening the self- 
sufficiency of the working poor by 
broadening the categories of 
workers included in the minimum 
wage law; 

— Making sure monies 
previously appropriated for mental 



State Senator John Olver. 



For years, the Department of 
Public Utilities has allowed private 
utility companies to automatically 
pass on, without review, their 
claimed fuel costs in the form of a 
fuel adjustment charge. One of the 
most important actions of this 
legislative session was the passage 
of a law (just signed last week) 
establishing stiff, uniform 
regulations for the justification, 
calculation, and billing of fuel costs 
on electric bills. No charge may be 
levied in the future without a prior 
public hearing. I was proud to serve 
as floor manager for this important 
legislation — the first significant 
rate reform in many years. 

Regulatory abuses such as these 
often developed because the 
agencies could formulate their 
regulations in secret. I sponsored 
amendments to the state Ad- 
ministrative Procedures Act which 
now bar implementation of any 
agency regulations affecting the 
public without a prior public 
hearing. 

Massachusetts is the first state in 
the nation to enact a law providing 
relief from inflation to senior 
citizens who had been living on 



fixed incomes. I served on the 
special commission which drafted 
the minimum adequate income law 
— the law which provides regular 
cost of living increases in benefits 
for the elderly to insure that these 
benefits keep pace with rising 
prices. 

Women and young adults have 
been seeking equal standing under 
the law. I have sponsored 
legislation to bring about such 
changes as: 

— ending the automatic ex- 
clusion of women with children 
from juries; 

— providing eighteen, nineteen, 
and twenty year olds the right to 
own property, the right to sign valid 
contracts, and the other legal rights 
of adults. 

In the past, the less wealthy 
communities in this district have 
carried an unfair share of the 
burdden for county government. 




AMNERSTCHIIIESEFOOI 

62 Main St., Amherst 
Tel. 253-7835 
EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT 
Lunch Specials 99c & up 



FENTONS ATHLETIC 
SUPPLIES 



All Your TENNIS Needs 

RACKETS 

BALLS 

RESTRINGING 

» 

Also — Softball Supplies and Swim Wear 

Open Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -5:30, 
Sat., 9 a.nn.-l p.nn. 
377 MAIN ST., AMHERST, 253-3973. 



t- 



./:^' 



m 



health facilities are spent in the 
right areas and bring us the 
maximum federal reimbursements; 

— Restructuring and upgrading 
the Department of Public Utilities 
and its rate procedures so that 
utility rates will reflect the actual 
cost of service; 

— Taking an active part In 
assessing the pros and cons of 
meeting our energy needs through 
nuclear power; 

— Extending the full range of 
services needed by the elderly to all 
the communities in Hampshire 
County. 

But none of these proposals, or 
many other worthwhile projects, 
can be accomplished without 
attention to the most important 
task before us — an improved state 
economy. Only with more jobs and 
businesses can we reduce 
unemployment; only with more 
jobs and more businesses 
generating more taxes can we 
increase state revenues. This 
government has the tools to attract 
industry to Massachusetts if it has 
the will to do so. 

I look forward to the opportunity 
of continuing to serve the citizens 
of the Franklin Hampshire District 
for another term in the state senate. 



XEROC BULK RATE 



Gnomon Copy Service, in Amherst, is of- 
fering a bulk rate of fwvo cents flat for Xerox 
copies. To qualify, an order must meet the 
following conditions: (a) 5 or more copies of each 
original (b) unbound originals only (c) two-sided 
copies' (d) $5.00 minimum (e) allow 24 hours. 
Orders meeting these conditions will be Xeroxed for 
two cents per copy. Collating and choice of regular, 
three-hole, legal, or colored paper are free. 25% rag 
paper is Va cent extra per sheet. Gnomon is open 7 
days a week. Phone 253-3333. 

*For copying onto one side only, add % cent per copy. 



r 



Hwfil 



mmmBr 
SHshn 



great savings on the 
following — but hurry, 
the quantities are 
limited! 

LEE 

Doubit Knit 

SUCKS 

were $12.98 



now 



le 




also on sale... 

HALTER TOPS 

TANK TOPS 

SUMMER TOPS 

MS. LEE SLACKS 

SCHOLL SANDALS 

all at: 

UNIVERSITY 
STORE 

Campus Center 



V»NV 



♦ .♦'%VA»VA%V.VAV' 



V* *•♦ ♦»%%%%%%%• 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 

■ ■ - - I ' ll ■ - ■'* 



THURSDAY, AUGUST )5, 1974 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Pa9*7 



■'-'-■-- ' - ■ ^ *■*■! 



Graduate Senate's view 



IT MirS TO SHOP THEFINil^^^W I Revenue Sharing described 



Finast will no longer increase prices of food once placed 



On Wednesday, Juiy 24, 1974. ail Finast Super- 
markets began a new pricing policy on Qrooery, 
Meat and Produce items. 

1. When Finast is forced to nrval<e a price in- 
crease, cans and padtages already price marked 
on the shelves will be sold at the old lower price. 



When items are restocked on the shelves, the 
new. higher priced items will be placed behind the 
lower priced items. 

2. Weekly specials or "sale items" are priced 
lower than regular prices. Any remaining after the 
sale event, will be repriced upward. 



3. As regular prices go down, Finast will rrv 
mediately reduce the price on shelf stock, andtne 
lower price will always be honored at the regiaer 
When a can or a package shows nrxxe than w^ 
price, the custonier pays the lowest price for that 
can or package. 



4. Baked goods, baby food, fair trade, and 
items controlled by state laws are exempt from 
this new policy. 

5. Until current stocks are sold there will be 
some items of our many thousands with more 
than one price marking on the can or package. 
Please bear with us during this transition. 



SAVE ^2»» ""^^^X COUPONS 



Save 35 



onOne6ozJar 

Maxwell 
House 
Instant 
Coffee 



With 

This 

Coupon 



^^^^ 



VaM thni Aug 17 




I |^^9 



Save 12 



With This Coupon on One 1 lb pkg 

Promise Soft 
Margarine 

.rr V««d thru Aug 17 



HQ^^ 




ri^ 



Save 15 



With This Coupon on One 12 oz can 

Favor 

Pumltur* Polish 



l^jQgQ 



[M) 



VaMU.uAug 17 
H.463 




Save 30 



With This Coupon on One 1 lb can 

YulMin Cofffoo 
Rogular 



[jjjl VaHO thru Aug 17 



M-457 




ir 



Save 15 



With This Coupon on One 35 oz pl(g 

Calgonito 
Dish Dotorgont 



|ffl^^ 



(MJ ''*>^'*^^" 




Save 17 



With This Coupon on Two 9'/i 02 phgs 

Chipos 
Potato Chips 



HQ^^ 



(TTI VaM thru Aug 17 
UWJ M-447 




Save 10 



With This Coupon on One 16 oz btl 



I |jQ^9 



Wooitto 
Liquid 

|m] 



VaM thru Aug 17 
H-«S4 




Save 25 



with This Coupon on One pkg 100 

Upton 
Toa Bags 



Fs' 



Lipton 

i: lonieaeacs 




|^^9 @ 



Valid thru Aug 17 
H-445 




Save 15 



With This Coupon on One 33 02 btl 

Nu-Soft Coconut 
FalMlc Softener 



i 



^ffl^^ 



fj^ Valid thru Aug 17 



H-«52 




Save 10 



With This Coupon on One 22 02 pkg 
Crocker PudgO 

Brownie Mix 



'^^- 

^^^^^)^ 

^^^ 



fJ^J 



[7T1 VaM thru Aug 17 
ISSJ H-449 



Save 13 



With This Coupon on One 28 02 btl 

Mr. Ciean 
Liquid Cleaner 



I fffl^9 [m1 



Valid thru Aug 17 
M-455 




With This Coupon on One 49 oz pkg 



Miracie White 
Detergent 



l»|pl @ 



Valid thru Aug. 17 
H-4S6 




Save 10 



With This Coupon on One 5 lb bag 

Qoid Medai 
Fiour 



Ugl 



VaM thru Aug. 17 
H-448 






inMlw^naui 




With This Coupon on One 72 oz pkg 

Qaines Prime 
Dog Food m ii 




Save 12 



With This Coupon on One 40 oz pkg f^T 

Caigon 
Water Softener 



1^^ M 



VaM thru Aug 17 
HUSO 




Cake Mixes 

Foam Cups "^M^ 

Cold Cups Fin- ^SXZy 

Vlasic Relishes \ 

Hot Dog, Sweet ^^ 10 oz $ ^ 

■f jars I 

Paper Plates 



Duncan 
HInes Layer 

I8V2 oz 
pkg 



49 



Tomato Sauce 

r«i_._._ /^i_; 9oz eat 



Potato Chips F.ru». 'p*" 69* 

Barbecue Sauce k,.« '!" 39* 




9 Inch Size 
White 



pkg 
100 




79' 

F/rtt Otfie Ffvsfi 

^ Fresli 

baches 

Sw«9et Plums 

f} lbs ^ 




Boneless Shoulder 

ndon Broil 



Gourmets Delight 



Cornish Hens 




California 
Cherrystone 



BarUett Pears 



California 



W 1^8 I 



Prm^ Chicken P»rt9 



Legs 



Fresh 
Tasty Chicken 



Quartered 
with Back 



49 



Quarter 
Loin 



Check Thef Value* 

Pork Chops 

$409 



lb 



Equal AnxMjnt of Sirloin 
Hip and Center Cut Chops 



1 



H) 




In Store Beke Shop 

Rye or 
umpernlckle 



Bread 

In SlorM « 

wKh loaf 

BakaSfwp 



49 



Breast Quarters ^ .b 53* 

Chicken Legs .«> 69* 

Drumsticks b 79* 

Chicken Breasts ^^ •!> 89* 

Breasts tX: bl.49 

Chicken Wings » 49* 



mr Dell Peeturea 

Boiled Ham 



Sliced Bacon rom '^^ 1.09 

Spare Pibs fr^ » 99* 

Pork Butts wr^JSZ* ,1.19 

Jones Sausage bX!;:^^ . .X 99* 
Swift's Sausagev.^-. . . 'p^^s 79* 
Gem Franks aZZ^ «, 99* 




InternaVonel Seafood 



Imported 

Freshly Sliced 

to Order 



$459 



1 



m|^7 Seafood 
••■?► Delight 



rbot Fillet 

89« 



Swiss Cheese impon.! ...» 1.49 

Genoa Salami ac Ht. 1.19 

Dandy Loaf c«»<db » 99* 

Roast Beef t 79 



AvtHaWa m Slora* wMh SanHoa DM 



Jumbo Smelts , 59* 

Medium Shrimp » 1.39 

CrabOawslC ,,1.99 

Flounder Fillet ot: » 1.19 



Finast 



0^00^ /^^^Ia Americas 
WOkw wOia Finest Quality 



Refreshing 
Treat 



half 
gal btl 



69 



Cat Food 



Lovin' 
Spoonful 



Purina 
All Varieties 



412'^ 02^4 
cans I 



Frozen Food Valueal 



Lemonade k*^ 



Frozen 
Concentrate 



or P«M 
lyitoad(Mrt>raok 



m cans ■ 
2 5:589* 



Sweet Corn 

Peas & Carrots liTSS^ 2 SSJSy 



5:^1.00 

Potatoes^X 1S«S'69* 



Haddock Dinner o*^ . . 2 



Freah Dairy Valueal 

Cottage Cheese 



Finast Large 2 lb 

or Small Curd ctn 



Befit Yogurt fJh^ 
Sour Cream f^ 



99 



4 '0.^89* 



^49* 



Bnast 



SUPERMARKETS 

Pfto«t EHoctlve thru Sat., AuQ- ". i»" 



Since its inception, the Graduate 

-Student Senate has had an implicit 

policy of financial support for 

departmental graduate student 

organizations. 

Through such recognition and 
support it was hoped that 
departmental organization would 
grow to be a strong and vigorous 
part of graduate student political 
organization. It gradually became 
apparent, however, that the great 
amount of Senate time required to 
process funding requests and the 
inherent ad hoc nature of each 
decision actually served to impede 
the underlying intent of support. 

Therefore, during the 1973-74 
academic year the Graduate Senate 
undertook to write a Revenue 
Sharing Bill, under which the 



previously informal policy would 
become explicit and official, and all 
procedures standardized and made 
equitable. The Bill became 
operative in the second semester of 
that year and is intended to foster 
an environment in which depart- 
mental graduate student 
organizations can form and develop 
with the assurance of financial 
support and recognition. It is 
further intended that, by fostering 
increased communication between 
these groups and the Senate, itself, 
a stronger network of graduate 
student activism and a stronger 
base of will power will develop. 

While the Revenue Sharing Bill 
itself is too lengthly to be 
reproduced here (it will be widely 
distributRd 'n September), it's 



important that certain of its 
provisions be understood now in 
order that all graduate students 
have access to the process in the 
fall. 

Who is eligible 

The bill covers only non- 
exclusive departmental 
organizations (one per department) 
whose department has elected at 
least one graduate senator during 
the current semester. Other 
graduate student organizations 
(say, political factions, foreign 
student, women's, or Black 
caucuses) still have access to the 
Senate for funding not covered by 
this bill. 

How much money 

The Senate has allocated ap- 
oroximately 17 per cent of its full 



Meharry Medical College 
asking for contributions 



By LLOYD C.ELAM,M.D. 

President 
Meharry Medical College 
Once upon a time there was 
agame that children played in 
which one asked, "May I take a 
giant step?" and the answer came 
back, "Yes, you may" or "No, you 
may not". For a long time blacks of 
the United States were not able to 
"take a giant step". Each suc- 
ceeding generation struggled to 
feed, house and clothe a family, 
passing on very little in real assets 
to the next generation. Each 
generation of blacks has been in the 
same position economically as the 
poorest of the most recently arrived 
emigrants. And so today we are 
faced with a situation which is an 
accumulation of all the years of 

"no". 

Since the 1960's there has been a 
healthier openness within our 
society. But there remains a 
seesawing element in black 
economic gains. By 1970 the 
median income for a black family of 
four had risen to a level of 61 per 



cent of that of a similar sized white 
family. By the end of 1973 the black 
family median income ($7,270) was 
58 per cent of that ($12,600) of its 
opposite number for the nation as a 
whole. It is clear that it is only 
through giant steps that blacks can 
make the hold gains. 

Spurred by current health 
manpower shortages, for the past 
seven years Meharry has made a 
concerted effort to tap that large 
reservoir of talented blacks on the 
lower economic scale who for any 
nummber of reasons, not least 
economic, settle for jobs at levels 
far below their intellectual capacity. 
Meharry was founded in 1876 for 
the education of black health 
manpower. Today's student body 
includes whites, Mexican 
Americans and American Indians. 
But out of its past, Meharry seeks 
to make a contribution in two 
problem areas: to challenge the 
economically disadvantaged to try; 
to make a contribution to the health 
care of the Nation's indigent. The 
two aims are inter- related. 



The community that looks to 
Meharry's teaching hospital for 
health care is poor and 
predominantly, but not exclusively, 
black. By 1972 Meharry had replace 
its out— patient clinics with a new 
and exciting approach to arrv 
bulatory care. Each community 
resident is assigned to a permanent 
health care team and is seen on an 
appointment basis with evening 
and weekend hours. Emphasis is on 
prevention and early detection of 
illness. By example, and as 
responsible participants from 
sophomore year on, the students 
are learning what is meant by 
community responsibility in health 
care and what they are expected to 
deliver to their future communities; 
communities which will differ little 
from the present one. 

I hope you will see this as an 
opportunity to make a contribution 
(tax deductible) to a healthier 
nation. A contribution of $2500 will 
assure a full year's study to a 
student working for an M.D. or 
D.D.S. degree. 




Capture The Flavor 
of Old Deerfield 

& Colonial 
America at the 



The Gables Olde Taverne 



WiiniiJip 00/f 
BROiliP Ll¥i lOBSTiR SPiCIAl 

Lobster, Toss Salad, Potato, Homemade 

Rolls, Coffee 

$4.95 



60URMBT eUlMBMKi 

Home Made Clam Chowder 

Little Neck Clams or Shrimp Cocktail 

Steamed Clams Broiled Lobster 

Salad - French Fries — Rolls - Butter 

Dessert — Coffee 

U.95 



HAPPY HOUR Tuesday - Saturday 7 p.m. 
.\ flSHERMM'S puirriR 



8 p.m. 



»• 



m 



ST 



••>»' 



Scallops Haddock 

Shrimp Baked Stuffed Clam 

Salad French Fries 

Rolls - Butter Coffee 



$3.95 



ft/f CMfii Pl00irt ififf 9f ^^'00 



B§0§titt 



Featuring — Roast Turkey, Hot Baked Ham, Sliced Roast Beef, 
Lobster Newburg, Swedish Meat Balls, Celery and Olives, Home 
Baked Beans, Baked Ravioli and Cheese, Potato, Tossed Garden 
Fresh Salad, Dessert, Coffee, Rolls, Butter. 



. ^0f$ff9hm00t U9idap - StfafdSp For dance ^nd sing ALONG Good Times 



THE GABLES OLDE TAVERNE 



065-4643 



Follow Rte. 116 from Amherst to Rtes. 5 and 10 in South Deer- 
field, North 2 miles on right. — 



budget, or $9,600.00 for funding 
under this bill. Once per semester a 
qualified organization may request 
an amount up to a total of $50 plus 
$0.50 per fee- paying graduate 
student enrolled in that depart- 
ment. There is a maximum of 
$125.00 per semester per depart- 
ment. For example, a department of 
60 students could request up to $80 
per semester. 

Who decides 
The bill is written in such a way 
as there can be no judgement made 
on the amount of the request 
(except for limits set forth above) or 
on the proposed uses of the fun- 
ding. Direction is purely 
procedural-'Whether certain in- 
formation has been provided, 
whether a senator has been elected 



arxl rests witti a Board consistihg 
of tHQ officers of the Graduate 
Senate ar)d three senators elected 
by the Senate. 

Procedure 

Application for funds must be 
made by the midpoint of the 
semester. The organization must 
elect at least two officers, of which 
one must be the Treasurer arni who 
will be responsible for all 
procedures under this bill. The 
organization need not have a 
constitution, Ixit it must be open 
and accountable and provide 
certain information in its ap- 
plication. Where Revenue Sharing 
Funds have previously been 
granted to an organization, a copy 
of the budget for the previous 
semester must accompany a 
request. 

This has just been a sketch of the 
full bill. Copies will be widely 
distributed in the fall along with 
other documents concerning 
graduate students. 




|\T IHP 2ffl HPJeasanc scSSversc 



GARY A. PRESENTS 

The New Riders 
of the Purple Sage 



and 



Commander Cody 

and his 
Lost Planet Airmen 



Springfield Civic Center 

Springfield, Mass. 
Sat., August 17, 1974 
8:00 p.m. 



Tickets: $5.50 

Tickets Available at all Ticketron Outlets 
AMHERST SPRINGFIELD 

Fred Locke Stereo 
Neptune Waterbeds 



Faces of Earth 



Page 8 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 

i,a.nw.iiiiii"''i I' " ' '* 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



Pats' "Training Camp West"! 





_ / / 



by 

Steve Ruggles 

For head coach Chuck 
Fairbanks, spring training 
left many frustrations. ..his 
team never showed up. 

Although some 70 rookies 
and free agents went 
through double session 
workouts each day, only a 
few stood to make the squad 
once the players' strike 
ended. 

Indeed the key to the 
Patriots' future lies with 
those "veterans," some 20 
rookies who played with the 
'73 team. Fairbanks left 
little doubt that the way for 
the Patriots to become a 
winning team was to Im- 
prove those players they 
already had. 

Still, the players in 
"training camp west" 
practiced hard and kept 
their hopes high. For some 
It was a good paying job 
while It lasted, for others It 
was a serious attempt to 
become a professional 
football player. 

Now the veterans are 
back In camp for a two 
week cooling off period. 




What many will find, 
however, Is serious com- 
petition from rookies and 
free agents that have had a 
chance to mature longer 
due to the strike. 

But no matter who makes 
the squad, the chances for a 
winning season are slight. 



The Patriots have the 
toughest schedule in the 
NFL, Including an opening 
day debut against the 
Miami Dolphins. 

So If you're one of those 
die-hard Patriots' fans, 
"just wait 'til next year.'' 

* f ♦ 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P«9e » 




• # <5 





• «««*««*»»••*»«« ♦.♦.♦.♦ • . • •,^f.».».•.♦A•.•.•.^^♦,^^^^^^VAV•v.^ .^v*%'.'.',%vv 



/ ^ y * * # *^# •*', 



Sixth Pan-African conference a first 



Recently Hodari Ali attended the 
historic 6th Pan African Congress 
held in June in Tanzania. He 
traveled also to Kenya, Uganda, 
Israel, and Egypt 

Q. Why did you attend the 
congress? 

A. I was doing a research project 
at Howard and I proposed to study 
the newspapers in East Africa, 
Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda. The 
NNPA National Newspaper 
Association provided funds so that 
I could correspond for the 6th Pan 
African Congress. 

Q. What were you most im- 
pressed by? 



A. Of all the five countries I was 
most impressed with Tanzania, 
because this is a nation that is 
seriously on the road to building a 
socialist and self relient society. I 
had the opportunity to meet the 
President and I was very much 
impressed with ♦he wisdom and the 
policy of the land. 

Q. Do you think you nade any 
lasting friends? 

A. One of the main questions 
before I left was "I wonder if they'll 
accept us?" But now I can come 
back, and say without a doubt they 
do. Because we are African people. 
We were born African. Fortunately 



in the different countries I went to I 
had friends to stay with and to 
show me around. I also made 
friends in each country, and we 
promised to keep correspondence. 

Q. What is the importance of the 
6th Pan-African Conference? 

A. The fundamental significance 
of the 6th Pan-African Congress is 
that it was the first meeting of its 
kind. This year the congress met 
and its important because they met 

on the continent. 

Q. What is the importance of the 
Congress? Why do we need to have 
a Congress? 

A. Because in 1974 the need for 



Continuing Ed offering 
over 100 fall courses 



The Division of Continuing 
Educction is offering over 100 
evening courses this fall. Students 
can choose from a wide variety of 
credit and non-credit courses, both 
on the graduate and undergraduate 

level. 

A sampling of courses includes: 
Divorce Law, Landscape Main- 
tenance, Weather and Our At- 
mosphere, Photography, Writing 
Books for Children, Real Estate, 

UlVlass. profs 
get grants 

U.S. Rep. Silvio 0. Conte, R- 
Mass., and Sen. Edward W. Brooke 
have announced that the National 
Science Foundation has awarded 
crants to the University of 
Massachusetts of Amherst and 
Smith College. 

The grants to UMass include: 
One in the amount of $88,300 to 
j-upport a 12-month project en- 
titled: "Group Technology Applied 
to the Automatic Handling of Small 
Parts." Principal investigator will be 
Geoffrey Boothroyd of the 
Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. The second grant, in 
the amount of $9,300, will support a 
Regional Conference in Ergodic 
Theory. Principal investigator will 
be Jack Clark of the Department of 
Mathematics and Statistics. 

Smith College was the recipient 
of a $15,500 grant. The grant will 
support a 12- month project on 
Lamarck's Theories of Nature and 
Evolution. Leslie J. Burlingame of 
the Department of History will 
serve as principal investigator. 



Super 8 Film Making, and an 
Anthropology course - Apes to 
Angels: The Skeletons in Your 
Closet. Courses in psychology, 
English, foreign languages, art, 
education, business, and history are 
offered. Most courses carry three 
UMass credits. 

The counseling staff of the 
division is available to aid students 
with course selection and 
registration as well as advice about 
the Bachelor of General Studies 
degree, a flexible degree program 
which allows students initiative in 
planning an undergraduate 
program. Admission to the Evening 
College is open to the general 
public, and students may register 
for UMass day courses on a space 
available bases. All credit courses 
are approved by the Veterans' 
Administration. 



In- person registration will take 
place in Hills House lobby, August 
26-29, at 10 a.m., and August 30 
and 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Correction 

In an article titled 
"Students Discontent with 
SGA" in last week's 
Solstice, Jacqueline Cor- 
mier was given the title of 
assistant to the UMass 
president. In fact, she is an 
assistant to SGA president 
Richard Savini. 

Although she compiled 
the results of the student 
survey, the survey was 
actually developed by 
James Delmonico. 



African people, as a people, the 
need for us to unite for the well 
being of Africa as a whole is still 
very much there. When you read 
about the different power block the 
super powers, the U.S., USSR, 
China and soforth, and while the 
fundamental struggle of the world 
is the class struggle between those 
imperialist nations and those who 
are seeking socialism, there is still a 
need for us to unite, and to bring 
about socialist change in the 
development of Africa. 

Q. What about the organization 
of the Congress? 

A. There was a delegate selection 
process, which chose 

representatives through out the 
African continent, and from the 
U.S., Canada, Caribbean, West 
Indies and through out the different 
places of the world. They were 
based on the different work and 
activities the people had done to 
become in the Congress. 

Q. Was it just a giant meeting? 

A. It was divided into three 



essential parts. First the Plannery 
sessions which were every day, and 
this is when the different policy 
speeches, and the speeches from 
heads of nation were given in which 
they delivered their government or 
delegation commitments to Par^ 
Africanism, and Africanism, arxl to 
the struggle. After these sessions 
the delegates were divided into 
different workshops, there was the 
political session, science and 
technology, and the economics. 
These were the three major ones. In 
the evening there was a series of 
receptions where there might be 
poetry reading, arKJ several other 
things. 

Q. What do you mean about the 
class? Are there really classes? 

A. I talk about Africa '74, You 
don't see the white people, but you 
see the exploitation. You caa't say 
all black people are bad, but you 
look at the capitalism, the system 
which is the problem of Africa. 
There is class, and I have seen it 
myself. 



SUMMER IN 
AMHERST? 



1 



^9 Belchertown Rd.. 

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 

4 p.m. -6 p.m. 

35c Beer — 50c Mixed Drinks 

Entertainment Thurs.-Sat. 

DINNERS SERVED 

Mon.-Thurs. 5:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

Pri, 5:30 p.m.-l 1:00 p.m. 

Sat. 5:00p.m.-ll:00p.m. 

Sun. 4:00p.m.-I0:00p.m. -, 




For people 
who walk 
the earth . . . 

Shoes, Sandals, Sabots 
and Boots for Men & Women 
from $23.50 - $42.50 
Brochure Available 




J S c. f-. H.-. 'Kl\»«' 




264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413) 256-8911 

14 Story St. 
Brattle Arcade 
Cambridge, Mass 02138 
(617) 492-6000 



Our Soft Clog 

U.S. Patent No. 3305947 



Amherst Hours: 

10-5:30, Mon.-Satw 11-7 p.m., Fri. 



Top of the Campus 

August 15y 16, 17 



9 n.m. ' 1 a.m. 



Page 10 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1»74 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 1$, 1»74 



itifi <i m >i 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page ii 



wjy—t -v>»*w»*? f**^'' 



^CK TO SCHOOL SALi FOURTH OF 
[SCIVIHG DAY SALI SALI OF SALES SALi SPECIAL 
iSALi FATHER'S DAY SALE 
JSHAMROCK SALE VALEHTINE 
** ROST IS ON THE PUMPKIN 



JULY SALE JUNE BARGAINS SALE MEM6ftiAL DAY SALE LABOR DAY SALE CHRISTMAS SALE THANll 

_^ SALE SPECIAL PURCHASE SALE BROWN BAG SALE TRADE-IN SALE HOLIDAY SALE MOTHER'S DAY I 

cIhLdVeN'S DAY SALE BLUB SKY SALE PRICE SLASHING SALE ONE OF A KIND SALE WHILE 11IEY LAST SA^ 

he's d/t SALE SWeKhEART^ 

N TillBr'Hn MilJE EAILN BrriftrT SAIJ^'^ "TLDAP^^i^^yjIi^ "*|r "^fiY DAY SALE STOK 



|IE¥nDE SAI 

LE EVER1 
iNUARYi 

ARCH 



^.. Up to S0% Of S and MW dont 
M even call it a SALESi 

N saleI 

SALE GR 

DAY SAL 

OF A KIND S U b^WTN^ ^^^W ,^flAw^^^»^^ALl 

MOTHER'S DAY SALE ni l l l i l R Mv^^i^HILDRllR DAY SALE SATFT^F SALES SALE 
[ADE-IN SALE MEMORIAL DAY SALELABOR DAY SALE CHRISTMAS SALE THANKSGIVI 
OF JULY SALE JUNE BARGAINS SALE TODAY SALE END OF THE MONTH CLEARANCE Si 
SEPTEMBER CLEARANCE SALE OCTOBER CLEARANCE SALE NOVEMBER CLEARANCE SAL 
CTION SALE INVENTORY CLEARANCE SALE MIDNIGHT MADNESS SALE DONT GO TO ^ 
ALE JULY CLEARANCE SALE AUGUST SALE FEBRUARY CLEARANCE SALE MARCU-OEAR 
LOW PRICES SALE SAVIN' OF THE GREEN SALE JANUARY^ 
SALE SUPER SAVINGS SALE AFTER INVENTORY CLO 



save big on 

/I i^reconclitioned 

&Q PIONEER 

equipment 
and marantZ closeouts 






PEN HOUSE SAL| 
N SALE JA 
E SALE Ml 

OFOR 
ICE CLEAR 
TH CLEARI 
NCE 

RY 
ESA 

RRY 
TOW 
^RAZIRPAYS 
S SALipAINY 

G SAlf 
1|>LIDA^1|SALE 
'■--iGjMLETR 
E FOURTH 
Hi I SALE 
T „ 

NCE 

DAY 

LLOW 



> 



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WSF 



SX424 24 Watt AM-fM Rec. 
SX525 25 Watt AM-FM Rec. 
SA9100 130 Watt Stereo Amp. 
SA5200 26 Watt Stereo Amp. 
Project 60 2-Way System 
CSR 300 2- Way System 
CSE400 2-Way System 
TX 6200 AM-FM Tuner 
TX 8100 AM-FM Tuner 



NOW 
$137.00 

$174.00 
$291.00 
$90.00 
$38.00 
$70.00 
$52.00 
$90.00 
$162.00 



^ 



LOWEST PRICES YET 




i . > 



# :»» -jl ,,^ - 



f /»t>l>V. '\ 




> : "* > m f -> 



i'iti > '-^ 



^'^^ 3 



^ ^ S) 



^ ^M^^4 



• • 



ONCE A YEAR BARGAINS 



*^1> ^ O 



^s s 



«« « • 



SD 1100 Stereo Display Unit 
QX 4000 40 Watt 2-4 Ch. Rec. 
QX 949 160 Quad. Receiver 

I QX 646 40 Watt 2-4 Ch. Rec. 

QL 600 A 20 Watt SO 
& Matrix Adapter 

QL 600 20 Watt SQ 
& Matrix Adapter 

QD 210 SQ Recorder 

CS 44 8" 2-Way Sp. System 



Reg. 
$599.95 

$379.95 

$749.95 
$499.95 
$229.95 

$229.95 

$ 99.95 
$ 74.95 



NOW 
$389.00 
$247.00 
$486.00 
$299.95 
$150.00 

$140.00 
$39.95 
$49.00 



JBL 88 - SPEAKERS 




PIONEER SE 405 
HEADPHONES 

KOSS KO 7278 
HEADPHONES 



Reg. 
$249.95 

Reg. 
$44.95 

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$34.95 



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MARANTZ 



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OUTS 



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'34 



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24' 



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ALL EQUIPMENT FULLY WARANTEED 

AMPLIFIERS Reg NOW 

2220 40 Watt Receiver $299.95 '249^^ 

2230 60 Watt Receiver $399.95 '339^^ 



SCOTCH C-60 Cassettes buy 2 get 1 free 
28-1650 AMPEX Casette Head Cleaners 

Reg. $2.95 Now 49* 

SEIDEN SOUND 



2245 90 Watt Receiver 
LAFAYEHE 1-60 (28-0122) 

Reg. 99C ea. Now 2 for 99* ^270 140 Watt Receiver 
$1.00 off any Diamond Needle 
Reg. $2.79 Now $1.79 



$499.95 



'399 



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Hiir/y in todaf. Quantitiei art llmM. 
$9lB 9inls Weds., A119. n 1974 



L 




Amherst Store 
15 E. Pleasant St. 

(Next To The Pub) 

OTHER STORbb 

ALBANY. NY. PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

SCHENECTADY. NY. COLONIE, N.Y. 

GLEN FALLS, NY. UTICA. NY. 




n^n'n'immmmF9'9WW9wn^fwaamwmHmmm9mf9ww99m 



1IADI0 ELECTRONICS 



IP'Yfafjs of Sound Servicp 



Football staff eyes '74 season 





Last season's action — a lot to be desired. 

Photo bv St»v0 Rugglaa 



The following "capsule forecast" 
was prepared by the U Mass 
football staff 

Coach Dick MacPherson begins 
his fourth season at the helm of the 
Minutemen gridiron fortunes and is 
looking optimistically to what could 
be a banner year. Co— captains Ed 
McAleney and Dennis Kiernan head 
a cast of twenty— seven returning 
letter winners and as Spring Drills 
got underway, a veteran defensive 
unit appeared to be the forte of the 
squad. Replacing quarterback Peil 
Pennington, who rewrote the 
school's passing records during the 
past three seasons, could be a 
problem although seniors Fred 
Kelliher and Mark Tripucka have 
both moved the team well while 
lettering during the past two 
seasons. A more aggresive interior 
offensive line performance is a 
must in order to improve last fall's 
anemic running game and 
sophomores from the 3—1 frosh 
unit of a year ago could be the 
answer. The schedule lists five 
rugged independent clashes in 
addition to six Yankee Conference 
contests and bringing the Bean Pot 
back to Amherst is the number one 
priority of the team. 

Some coaches would be happy 
with a 6 — 5 record at the end of a 
football season, but U Mass Coach 
Dick MacPherson makes no bones 
about his disappointmant with the 
Minutemen's gridiron per- 
formances of last fall and promises 
some noticeable improvement this 
season. 



197^ 


% Schedu 


le 


» 




Series Standing 






Date 


Opponent 




Place 


1973 Score 


UM Opp 


T 


Sept. 14 


Villanova 




Villanova, Pa. 


21 20 


2 1 





Sept. 21 


+ Maine 




Orono, Maine 


200 


15 4 


1 


Sept. 28 


Dartmouth 




Hanover, N.H. 


DNP 


20 


1 


Oct. 5 


-f-VERMONT 




AMHERST 


27-7 


24 5 


2 


Oct. 12 


-(-BOSTON U. 




AMHERST 


206 


9 10 





Oct. 19 


-1- Rhode Island 




Kinoston, R.I. 


3541 


20 26 


2 


Oct. 26 


+ CONNECTICUT 




AMHERST 


6 28 


24 18 


2 


Nov. 2 


G>lgate 




Hamilton, N.Y. 


DNP 


1 





Nov. 9 


Holy Cross 




Worcester, Mass. 


28 30 


8 13 


4 


Nov. 16 


-t-NEW HAMPSHIRE 


AMHERST 


287 


22 10 


3 


Nov. 23 


-(-BOSTON COLLEGE 


AMHERST 


1459 

141 


4 8 





'returing'offensive lettermen 




RETURNING DEFENSIVE LETTERMEN (13) 








+ YANKEE CONFERENCE 


GAMES HOME GAMES START AT 1:00 








P.M. 

1973 Varsity Record : 


Won 6 


Lost 5 Freshman Record 


:Won3 Lost 1 




^^^ 




9^rvu - ia<v>- 
,cjrv-^rn e.«'~ o"f "7^'^ 



if 



X 



There were a lot of factors that 
contributed to the demise of the 
perinnial Yankee Conference 
Champions a year ago, but, "This is 
another year," according to 
MacPherson, "And we intend to 
bring the Bean Pot back to Amherst 
where it belongs." 

Twenty seven (of forty two) 
lettenA/inners return to form the 
nucleus of this fall's contingent 
with experience being equally 
divided between the offensive and 
defensive platoons. Quarterback 
Peil Pennington and flanker Tim 
Berra accounted for more than half 
(124) of the team's 231 points 
scored a year ago and two thirds 
(1900 of 2900) of the yards gained 
on offense and will be extremely 
difficult to replace. 

On the offensive platoon the 
strength appears to be at tight end 
where Gary Mika, Billy Wolfe and 
Walter Parker all have excelled. Lee 
Harriman, a junior, is the only 
letterman at wide receiver but could 
be an outstanding one as the year 
develops. There are five lettermen 

at interior line positions guards 

Ned Deane, Don Sokolnicki, John 
Santoro and Jim Shea, along with 
center Bruce Pinto, "But since we 
averaged only 68 yards rushing 
agame a year ago as these per- 



formers lettered, I'm sure all interior 
line positions are wide open at this 
time," MacPherson has confided. 

The quarterback position is 
turning into a real dogfight with 
seniors Fred Kelliher and Mark 
Tripucka (back after sitting out last 
year with an injury), both ex- 
perienced and talented signal 
callers. The running back will be 
much improved if Bob Wolfe and 
Jerry Mondalto stay healthy 
although the latter missed spring 
drills to play baseball. Some help 
will be needed at fullback to back 
up Jim Torrance since Paul St. 
Onge will probably be switched 
back to the defensive line. 

An experienced defense appears 
to be the real strength of the 1974 U 
Mass football squad, however, with 
a trio of outstanding seasoned 
performers, end Ed McAleney, 
linebacker Dennis Kiernan, and 
cornerback Bob Parrott being, 
"Worth their weight in gold," 
according to MacPherson. Tom 
Bradshaw and Bill Cooke will join 
McAleney and St. Onge to form an 
outstanding forward wall and Dave 
Butterfield, Bill Toner and Doug 
Adgurson are linebacking let- 
termen. Parrott and Earl Brown 
appear to have the inside track at 

(Continued on P. 13) 



B^ MA&URCHAR^£ 



I^OTt 9. HAWEV 




KlViERSil>£ 



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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



Page 13 



\ 
\ 

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Page u 






H)Vlli|Ull|H)U!ii"M|i.iFniMii .1 • ■ ■ ... ' ' ■ .■■ ■ 

I'A I'l n /l t'l U ttit f't t'l A I'l I'l M 1*4 I'l A U l'( .'t I < I'l I - '1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1'. . . • ' . t\ n 1 1 ('. H /. /l I'l I'l/l M I'l t'. /. t • . ■ I It'll' 

stop & Shop or Farmview g 

i Large Eggs M^^m 

pONEDOZENGRADE"A"AHM|fl fl 

~5 WITH THIS COUPON AND ^^^^^T ^^^^ ?g 

.gf A $5 00 PURCHASE €^P ^^^^ 281 5^ 

^:^ Limit on* carton par customer Good Mon . Aug 12- Sal. Aug. 17. i^ 

or^MW V W V*.' V '.' V V V VV V V V V '.' '.' M V VV V VM V J^ '.' V V '.' V ',' V V V V V'JV'.'VVVV^VV ',*J.u/ u v ^^.^ ^ 

l^ftOHlHlllOll'l''''""'"''' ■'"" I ■'■"'iijih |i''''.|i iiiii|ll(HHliiH(|iiil S'SBpl I 

l^l'OOl)(llll)'ii''ll)lllli(l'll' illll:i|ll''':'l''i 'ii'i .' MiHhM'in niii/i'ij i rillin||i(| fii^T^ 

~ Minute Maid 

Orange ^^^C 
Juice 



12 oz 
Can 



^^^^ ^^^ 282 5^ 



WITH THIS COUPON AND 

A tSOC PURCHASE §;§ 

Limit ona can par cutlomar GoodMon.. Aug. 12 -Sat. Aug. 1' 1^ 

Aoui >^' imjii 1 1,1 1,1 ijii.i\o I jju,i 1.1.1 uu^i w.' vw I u) gi nui u u,u» uu.u uu u miwiu'^^ A 

lOOiiOlHi'Hi'iiH.H'il'jiiniiiyiiiuniNHiijOiMiiiiiiiijooyOOOOOnMuOiiii.l^ 



"Prove It To Yourself ** 

Before we put our Stop & Shop name on any 

product, it must meet our strict standards 

for quality . . . must pass laboratory tests . . . 

must meet with the approval of a panel of 

consumers. Our Stop & Shop Cleanser is no 

exception. It's a quality cleanser. Try it. Get a 

can FREE with our money-saving coupon. 



^ 



,, l)lllliii'llu|||i(l!l!|l)IHI|l|l(H!lj()ljilllll|l|ll)MlliJi 

Yi ii ft n ft ft i* ft ft ft ft j'l ft ft ft ftVi ftVi ft ft)iVi n ft ftft ft iVft ft ft ftVi 



Maxwell House 

Coffee $400 

2 Lb. Can ^^•^ 



Sfe 




WITH THIS COUPON AND 
A S500 PURCHASE. 

Limit ona can par cuatomar. Good Mon.. Aug. 12 - Sat. Aug. 17 



280 



»«l 




THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1974 

1 




FREE! 

WITH THIS COUPON AND A $5 00 PURCHASE. 

S$S Cleanser 



3^ 



14 oz. Cont. 

Limit ona conlainar par customer Good Mon . Aug 12 - Sat Aug. 17 



240 



HWfflt» 



Any or all coupons may ba rodaamad with only ona $5 purchaM_ j^OOt£UOU(Wl)UUP£lW 



Ivory Liquid 

Detergent 

32 oz. Cont. 




=€ 



^i WITH THIS COUPON AND 

§1 A $500 PURCHASE 

S5 Limit ona container par customer Good Mon.. Aug 12 - Sal Aug. 17 ^^ 

E)HHiiiiiii)i)()iH)i(i(i(l(Pioo()^ 



Stretch your Inidget with 
^ese all week specials 

and read this week^ 

ConsumerOsiniS' 

^ We've got some terrific values on this page. Try 'em. This weeks 

Consumerlsms talks canning. Tips for beginner, buys on things 

to can and can with. Pick it up. Get your Stop & Shopsworth! 

Our own delicious White Gem U.S. Grade "^" 




starts Monday, Aug. 12 - Saturday, Aug. 17 
More budfiet-Ktrelchini! xpfvinls ! 



Wishbone Dressing 

DELUXE FRENCH QQ*^ 

8 oz BOTTLE 0%7 

Spaghetti Sauces 

39' 



PRINCE BRAND 
3 FLAVORS- 16 oz JAR 



Ronzoni Macaroni 

ELBOW-ITOUNDBOX QQ*^ 

^; Potato Chips 

STOP & SHOP CQ* 

10 oz BAG 99 

Laddie Boy Dog Food 

4 c- *1 



BEEF CHUNKS 
Get your Stop A Shopsworth' 





white 
gem 



^ITc 



WHOLE 2^^-3 LBS. 
Picture our meaty, 
tender White Gems 
turning golden, on 
the barbecue grill. 
What a thrifty, deli- 
cious beginning for 
a family cookout. 

Cut up Of Split ^r 45?, 




'Quality Protected^^ Beef Naturally Aged! 

Rib Roast 




OVEN-READY 4th-7th RIBS 

Great beef! Stop & Shop 
beef. Beef that's aged natu- 
rally for extra tenderness, 
juiciness and flavor. Beef 
that's trimmed carefully to 
give you more good-eating. 




Quick mvals from thv frvozvr! 

Lemonade 

MINUTE MAID — 6 oz CAN JL ^^ 

Get your Slop 4 Shopsworlh! ^Cini^^ 

Twin Pack Cheese Pizza ^l^J t^.l^QQ' 
Stop & Shop Chicken Pie W,' 
stop & Shop Beef Pie 



-4 0. ggc 



.4 „ ggc 



Ptg 



Shoestring Potatoes 

SLIM JIM BRAND -2Vj LB BAG CQ* 
Just heat and serve WW 

Baby Broccoli Spears fl''°%S!i 39' 
Whole Green Beans emosEVEa U", *1 
Scallop Dinner 
Shrimp Dinner 



TASTE SEA 
TASTE O SEA 



85' 



• u 

Ptf 

Z 65' 



Stop & Shop -100% 
Natural Ice Cream 

HALF GALLON TUB 

ASSORTED FLAVORS 



$1 



39 



Combos Bars 



STOP 4 SHOP BRAND 
20COUNT-35OZ PKG 



$1 

Cert'niy Citrus 



09 



STOP t, SHOP BRAND 
24COUNT-42 0Z PKG 



99' 



KeeblerZesta Saltlnes le oz pkg 57"^ 



Rib Steak, Bone-In OualityProtected" eeet *1 

Boneless Delmonico Steak r>b eye *2 
Rib Roast, Oven-Ready i*t 3rd Rib. 



49 

lb 

69 

lb. 



'.oloninl hriintt fiiinntntt'es fjunUty 
anil freshness — mini-priced , loo! 

COLONIAL SLICED 

Cold Cuts 




LUXURY. LUNCHEON 

BOLOGNA 

PiP OR OLIVE 



Colonial Sliced Bacon 
Tasty Ten Franks coloniai 
Colonial Beef Franks 

Colonial Bologna 

SLICED 1 POUND PACKAGE 

Master Smoked Shoulder 

COLONIAL —WATER ADDED 

Colonial Smoked Pork Butt 

BONELESS — WATER ADDED 

Colonial Ham Steaks 

IN CRYOVAC PACKAGE — WATER ADDED 



' lb »-t29 

Pkg ■ 
t lb 
Pkg 

' lb QQC 

Pkg 33 



89" 



99« 



lb 



79' 



P«' $119 

lb ' 



ptf 
lb 



MM 



Sliced fresh to order in our 
Service Deli Hut! 

AVAILABLE IN STORES WITH A SERVICE "'ELI 

Boiled Ham 

IMPORTED ^f CO 

Mini-pnc^d< to save you money ^^^» 

Stop & Shop Franks -{^^^SS' >r *1» 
Nepco Cold Cuts ,:? 55= 

OLIVE PiP MOCK CHICKEN OR LUNCHEON LOAE 

White American Cheese ^ 55' 

More budget atrelchinit specials! 

Fresh Flounder 

FILLETS fil%Q 

Something delicious tor dinner ^^^^i» 

Canned Steamer Clams doxsee „'; 99= 
Cooked Fish Cakes taste osea ;;j 69' 



Fresh from our Garden of Eatin^! 

Bartlett Pears ft . 7Q^ 

Loaded with natural luice —Minl-priced.' ^^^F ^ ^^^ 

Fresh Green Peppers Crisp Cucumbers 



Serve m a salad or try 
and make a submarine sandwich 



29 



"* 0"*'»f ''>' Sll'* '^'■' Byll-'JIh'^ ■ 



e Slice and add vinegar 

lb tor an easy surrtmer salad 

'•1* ">'s r.< irt nih»i '#1*.. 0«ll>«'1 O' *^ole%•'*'l 



3 - 29' 




Only at Stop & Shop 

St. MIchacrs 

Fine Imported 
English Biscuits 



^PKgfJ 



Fine English cookies 

from Marks & Spencer, 

London ... all made with pure natural 

ingredients. Assorted varieties in 

6 oz., 8 oz. and 1 2 oz. packages. 

AU-ueek dairy specials ! 

Cheddar Sticks 

STOP & SHOP CHEESE BOARD 10 01 
SHARP. X SHARP OR MELLOW Pkg 



PILLSBURY-Boz PKG 
Just pop in the oven 



89^ 

Sun Glory Orange Juice d"*., 49* 
2 lb. American White Cheese M" 

LAND O' LAKES - 2 POUND PACKAGE 

Buttermilk Biscuits 

4p.,^49' 

Columbo Plain Yogurt c^,.".. 79' 
Stay N' Shape Cot. Cheese L" 49* 

BREAKSTONE BRAND 
M e bake these noodies tmrseli^es ! 

English Muffins 

STOP & SHOP - 1 1 oz PKG ot 6 ^ „^ ^^ 
REGULAR OR SPLIT ^ '^''•* 9M, 

Old Fashioned Type Bread 39' 

STOP & SHOP - 16 02 LOAF 

Stop & Shop Oatmeal Bread V'^, 39^ 

Buttercrest Bread 

YAH-YAH - SLICED WHITE f% %* 

STOP & SHOP - BIG 24 oz LOAF ^ '■''•"" | 

Stop & Shop Rhubarb Pie 'iV 75' 
Strawberry Rhubarb Pie''yf:,VKT75' 



Franlcfurt Rolls 



STOP & SHOP 
12 02 PKG ot 8 



Stop & Shop Peach Pie 
Date Nut Bread 



3 •• *1 



»o. 75c 



Pkg 



M 



STOP t SHOP n p^„. 

13 o« PKG ^ '^'"9» 

Cranberry Nut 1 2 02 or Banana Tea Bread 12'/? 02 

Stop & Shop Toasties- Corn t," 39' 

BRAN IOVj oz or DATE 9 02 

Quick meal iiletis from our 
Stop & Shop Summer Kitchen ! 

Cooked Chickens 

795 

Gelatines -Assorted Flavors c.^ 79' 
Chicken or Beef Pies 
Amer. Sub Sandwich 



WHITE GEM 
ROASTED OR BARBECUE STYLE 



Pkg 

Meat Loaf -2 lb. Pkg. frozen 

AVAILABLE IN STORES WITH A SERVICE DELI 



Vk? 69' 

%v, 0. ggc 
»0» 



Turkey Breast 



ROASTED - WHITE GEH4 
We've priced it to save you money. 

Chinese Style Pork Roll 



lb 



89' 



S 69' 




All ueek mini-priced!^ savingM 
on health & beauty aids! 

Sure Deodorant 

REGULAR OR UNSCENTED fiA^ 
6 oz. AEROSOL CAN 0*7 

Prell Shampoo 

1 1 oz. STL. OR PLASTIC T O^ 
5 oz CONCENTRATE TUBE f 9 m 

Start Your 
McCall's 

COOK BOOK 
COLLECTION 
'^ AT STOP & SHOP 

With Purchase of Volume #1 

Cookie Collection. You Get... 

FRFF^ Cook Book Holder 
AMMMs^K,. ,nd Index Book 




All Stop & Shops open every morning at 8:00 A.M. for your convenience. 



Minutemen football 



(Continued from P. 11) 



cornerback position and Bob 
Levine, Steve Wood and Joe Kulls 
have all defensive secondary game 
experience. 

Andy Dutkanicz, who handled 
most of the kicking game so ef- 
fectively a year ago, has graduated 
and sophomore Gregg Sprout 
appears capable of taking over the 
placement chores with a minimum 
of difficulty but a search is on for a 
consistent punter. There is a 
possibility that several members of 
last fall's 3—1 freshman team could 
break into the starting lineup on 
opening day and this group in- 
cludes center Dave Williamson, 
guard Russ Cooke, defensive 
lineman Dennis Fenton, linebacker 
John Toner, and cornerback Rich 



Harris. 

"This will be the fourth class we 
have recruited," MacPherson has 
stated, 'And the fruits of our ef- 
forts should be evident this fall." 
The scheduir is certainly just as 
difficult as that of a year ago and 
with most Yankee Conference 
teams returning substantial groups 
of experienced personnel the race 
for the Bean Pot could be an un- 
predictable affair. MacPherson has 
indicated he will use freshmen for 
the first time if the situation 
warrants, especially at the skill 
positions. In a nutshell, it looks as 
though the Minutemen could be a 
very fine football team this fall but 
needed depth must come from the 
underclassmen and injuries must be 
minimal as the season unfolds. 







^ ' '.IMk. W.^ L_» g* T -* 




The large Japanese Elm tree next to South College is being nursed back to health by U. Mass. arbocultuf» 
students. 

Students of Prof. Gordon King noticed the tree was "ill" because people had been walking across its roots. 
The students fertilized, mulched, pruned and fenced in the tree to improve its health. 

The tree is the only one of its kind in the country. Bill Lambert, the University landscape architect, said the 
tree was probably planted when South College was built. Photo mnd tout bv Jim Pmuiin 



Returning lettermen 



Name 



Ned Deane 
Lee Harriman 
Fred Kelliher 
Gary AAika 
Jerry AAondalto 
Waiter Parker 
Bruce Pinto 
John Santoro 
Jim Shea 
Don Sokolnicki 
Mark Tripucka 
Jim Torrance 
Bob Wolfe 
Bill Wolfe 



Doug Adgurson 
Tom Bradshaw 
Earl Brown 
Dave Butterfield 
Bill Cooke 
Mark Finnerty 
Dennis Kiernan 
Joe Kulis 
Bob Levine 
Ed McAleney 
Bob Parrott 
Bill Toner 
Paul St. Onge 



Jr. 
Sr. 
Sr. 
Sr. 
Sr. 
Jr. 
Sr. 
Sr. 
Jr. 
Sr. 
Sr. 
Jr. 
Sr. 



Northampton 
V.W. ® 

USED CAR specials 

'71 MERCURY CAPRI, 4 spd., 
std. 

$1,695.00 

'71 TOYOTA CORONNA, station 
wagon, auto. 

$1,995.00 

'71 TOYOTA COROLLA, 4 spd., 
std. 

$1,095.00 

'71 DATSUN 1200, 4 spd., std. 

$545.00 

'70 AUDI 100LS, 4 spd., std. 

$2,195.00 

Northampton V.W. 

246 King St. 

Northampton 

584-8620 

Open till 9 p.m. 



Offense 



Class PCS. 



Age Ht. Wt. 



Jr. 


G 


20 


6'3 


235 


Jr. 


WR 


20 


6'4 


200 


Sr. 


QB 


21 


6'3 


200 


Sr. 


TE 


20 


6'1 


208 


Jr. 


RB 


21 


5'8 


180 


Sr. 


TE 


22 


6'1 


225 


Sr. 


C 


21 


5'11 


205 


Jr. 


G 


20 


5'11 


228 


Sr. 


G 


22 


6'2 


220 


Sr. 


G 


22 


6'0 


215 


Sr. 


QB 


23 


6'0 


175 


Jr. 


FB 


22 


6' 2 


210 


Jr. 


RB 


21 


6'1 


205 


Jr. 


TE 


22 


6'3 


210 



Hometown 



Wilbraham, Mass. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Abington, Mass. 
Tarrytown, N.Y. 
Amesbury, Mass. 
Albemarle, N.C. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Medford, Mass. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
Anson ia. Conn. 
Bloomfield, N.J. 
Rye, N.Y. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Winchester, Mass. 



Defense 



LB 

DE 

CB 

LB 

DE 

S 

LB 

CB 

S 

DE 

CB 

LB 

DT 



22 
21 
23 
21 
23 
20 
22 
22 
20 
21 
21 
23 
23 



6'0 

6'2 

6'1 

5'10 

6'5 

6'1 

6' 2 

6'1 

5'11 

6'3 

6'0 

6'2 

5'10 



198 
230 
190 
195 
240 
195 
210 
185 
195 
235 
188 
190 
215 



Lynn, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Elmlra, N.Y. 
Attletwro, Mass. 
Albany, N.Y. 
Lancaster, Mass. 
New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Dracut, Mass. 
Bethesda, Md. 
So. Portland, Me. 
Metuchen, N.J. 
Swampscott, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 




OPEK 9: 30^5*: CO 




^W(7 



jeA^s 

3AC]ffiTS 
COATS 



J 



{|7JE7rTQTHE"PQSr OFFICE ^IN AMHERSiyJ 







» •••«»•«» I ♦»» •« •♦«.»•« * * */A\ ,\\\\ // . . . . , ........ 






Page 14 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST IS, 1974 



Debate workshop opens 



Political reform is the topic for 
the sixth annual Sunnnr>er High 
School Debate Workshop at the 
University of Massachusetts. For 
two weeks, August 4—18, fifty-six 
high school students will participate 
in intensive discussion, research, 
and coaching sessions exploring 
the 1974-1975 debate topic-that the 
United States shouki significantly 
change the method of selecting 
presidential and vice presidential 
candidates. 

The students, representing New 
England, New York, New Jersey, 
Virginia, Michigan, Illinois and 
Iowa, possess varying degrees of 
debate experience. All will take 
courses in communication theory. 



argumentation theory and debate 
skills. 

For the first time, a workshop for 
high school teachers will be held in 
conjunction with the students' 
workshop. Eight high school 
teachers will receive graduate credit 
in the direction of forensics 
programs. 

The workshop staff consists of 
Professor Ronald J. Matlon, 
Director of Debate at the University 
of Massachusetts; Professor Lee R. 
Polk, Director of Debate at Baylor 
University; Professor James F. 
Weaver, Director of Debate at Iowa 
State University; Professor A. 
Tennyson Williams, Jr., Director of 
Debate at Wake Forest University 



i9i^>WWmrm99 99W9 9'^FW^mF^9WWWWWTmW99 9 9 99<W^t^¥9^^t^ 



4>H€ • C/1PTNM'? i^BLG 



>^^ 



offering d 
sn m mrr of 

{,()()!) TIMES 



• Complete Dinner Menu 

WKDNKSI) \V SIM) \V, h ratui in^ 

Broiled Live Lobster 3"^! 

• Happy Hour Daily 4-6 p.m. 
all drinks only 49' 

• Entertainment Sunday & 
Monday Ni.tes 

• Luncheons Daily 11:30-3:00 

IHD.V.MON K()\I>. NOHTHA.MI'TON 



-^-^-^-^-'^^^'-^^'^-------^^^'■' ^ '•- '^ '^ -^ '-'-'-'"-'•- '^'-■^■^■^'^■^■^■'-^'^^ 



and Mr. Thomas J. Hynes, Debate 
Coach at the University of 
Massachusetts. 

The Department of Com- 
munication Studies and the Debate 
Union sponsor the workshop. 



Eagles at Lenox 

Top country rock act Eagles will 
appear at Mike Azarin's "Twilight 
Concerts on the Lawn" staged at 
the Music Inn in Lenox, Mass. on 
Thursday, August 22nd. 

Eagles, first formed in 1971 by 
several well respected session and 
back-up men whose credits in- 
cluded work with Linda Ronstadt 
and Rick Nelson's Stone Canyon 
Band, burst on to the national 
music scene with their hit single 
"Take It Easy" and have continued 
to produce top chart material right 
up to their most recent hit for 
Elektra records "Already Gone". 

Shows begin at 5 p.m. Tickets 
are available at Ticketron for $4.00 
or at the box office on the day of 
the concert for $4.50. For special 
Twilight Flight bus information 
contact your local Greyhound, 
Bonanza, Peter Pan and Arrow bus 
terminals. ^^^^ 

^y KUfKIM 

According to a 16th cen- 
tury surveyor, the way to 
find what a foot stood for 
was to line up 16 men, meas- 
ure their left feet and take 

the average. 

* * * 

In 18th century Europe, 
a "foot" was that of the reign- 








jng king. About 280 different 
sizes were in use. 



UMass guards placed 
in tower's elevators 

Security guards have been placed in the passenger elevators in the 
Graduate Research Tower — and according to UMass police chief David 
Johnston, they'll probably be there until the construction in that area is 
completed. 

The problem, Johnston said, is that construction workers there have 
been using the passenger elevators creating a "health and safety hazard" 
to passengers and a damage factor to the elevators themselves. 

By contract, the construction workers are supposed to use their own 
elevator which runs on the outside of a tower. 

But the passenger elevators are a short-cut for the workers, Johnston 
said. The workers sometimes carry lumber and paint into the elevators and 
the police chief said one professor was nearly hit by a 2x4; if paint is ac- 
cidentally spilled, some student or professor might damage his clothing. 

The guards took their stations Monday and Johnston said Tuesday 
there have been no complaints from the construction company. 

Johnston said the placing of the guards is "an unusual measure, but 
the only thing we could do." 



FINAL WEEKEND SPECIAL 




Thur. 
8/15/74 



I for a SMall 
plaia pizza 

35' for taeh 

additioaal ifam. 

Call 256-8587 



—1 



2 FREE Pepsis 



Fri 
8/16/74 



ONE OF THESE DAYS 

YOU'RE GOING TO 

GET YOURS 

A Oomino'i pizza, that is Th« word s out thot Do«nino s 

not only mok»t the bett pizio in town, but 

that they deliver it fott, utuolly withm 30 minutes. 

And there t no charge for delivery These ore 

the big reasons why Domino i is roptdly becoming the most 

popular pizza home m town. So, next Soturdoy, 

ofter a hord day of girl passing m the stands settle down 

to a pizza from Domino s You owe it to yourself 

Hm OomirM pMpl« art pino pMpl«, Pariod. 

nDOMMO^ 
PIZZA 

Call 256-8587 Free Deliver 



(upon request) 

With fha orrftr af 
aay siza pizza. 

Call 256-8587 



M- OFF 

ON MY 
URGE PIZZA 

Call 25S-8S87 



1 ■ ■ ^■ ■ ' ".' fl' i * . ' L ^ .t". 

THURSDAV. AUGUST 1$, 1»74 



■I*fTrj-r- 



95IT2JC 



3HT 



^r 4f!«^ 



-rr- 



^^^i^ f^ '^^^r*^!*- ■», ■ 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



P««e 15 



Your weekly stars 



fly Stella Wil<ler 

Inharmonious activities between 
and among celestial bodies make 
this coming week one of general 
instability. Those who would at- 
tempt to keep things as they are are 
doomed to failure. Those willing 
and able both to initiate change and 
to accept change initiated by others 
are destined for success of a special 
kind— the kind which, though only 
temporary, leads to bigger and 
better things in the very near future. 
For those who will end the week 
gainfully, the tendency throughout 
the week will be to neglect 
customary activities in the interest 
of the new and different; for those 
who will suffer losses, the tendency 
will be to cling to the known at the 
expense of progress and 
productivity. 

Rapidly shifting planetary in- 
fluences will create an atmosphere 
highly conducive to moodiness 
both on the part of individuals and 
where whole groups are con- 
cerned. It will be difficult to hold 
people to promises this week, or to 
insist that they keep to existing 
schedules. For promises will easily 
be broken, schedules easily set 
aside— not because people are 
immature or self-indulgent, but 
because they are, as a result of 
celestial upsets, subject to con- 
fusion and genuine lapses of 
memory. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 7)- 
Sensual pleasures play a large part 
in your general success- or lack of it- 
this week. Don't expect too much 
of yourself or anyone else. (Sept. 8- 
Sept. 22) — Though you may not be 
directly responsible for that which 
goes wrong this week, you may 
find yourself taking the blame for it. 
Seek good solutions. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 7) -A 
mood of despondency early in the 
week must not be allowed to 
dominate the thought processes. 
OthenA/ise, you will do yourself out 
of success. (Oct. 8- Oct. 22) - 
Material pleasures may come fast 
and furiously during the early part 
of the week. Don't be mislead into 
expecting easy success in general. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 7)- 
Consider every angle of a situation 
before you step in with plans to 
change things. You may not be as 
welcome as you expect to be. (Nov. 
8 -Nov. 21) — Though you may not 
realize it, you have a chance to 
impress others with your high 
intelligence this week. Take ad- 
vantage of a door opened by 
another. 



SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 
7) — There is more than a little 
chance that activities you thought 
secret will be disclosed this week. 
Make no effort to whitewash 
events. (Dec. 8-Dec. 21)-Broaden 
your cue from the way in which 
children handle much smaller af- 
fairs. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 
5) Health matters must not be 
shoved aside for a moment this 
week. Whatever comes up, see to it 
at once. Share information with 
others. (Jan. 6- Jan 19) — Changes 
of mood may have a serious effect 
on your efficiency this week. You 
may have to hide your own feelings 
in the interest of getting ahead. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 3)- 
Take care that impatience does not 
cause you to lose out in coming 
profits. You may have to take a 
back seat to youngsters for a few 
days. (Feb 4-Feb. 18)-The 
unexpected is to be expected at this 
time over the next six days— but 
leave plenty of room for change. 

PIECES (Feb. 19-March 5) -You 
may have to pui up with the burden 
of unforeseem expenses and 
unexpected debts. Do what you 
can to greet setbacks with real 
grace. (March 6-March 20) — Curb 
your impatience with those who 
refuse to move quickly enough to 
suit you. Cultivate those traits 
which will help you get along with 
others. 

ARIES (March 21 -April 4)- 
Business decisions early in the 
week may lead to the uprooting of 
your entire family. Take care, 
therefore, to know what you want. 
(April 5-April 19) -This is not the 
week for marking time. Be prepared 
to move as soon as you know 
which way to go. Don't hesitiate to 
change your mind. 

7/4 C//?(;S (April 20-May 5) - Take 
care that the rapid developments of 
th week don't cause you to 
become careless about personal 
habits. See to good grooming at all 
times. (May 6-May 20)-The 
reckless pursuit of gain could cause 
you considerable trouble, especially 
in your relationships with young 
people. Discretion pays. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 6)-Your 
sensitivity to the moods of others 
may make this both a confused and 
a confusing week. Changes are the 
order of the coming days. (June 7- 
June 20) -Orderly living may have 
to go by the board this week as you 
take advantage of new op- 
portunities for gain that demand 
your immmediate attention. 



CANCER (June 21 -July 7) -Take 
care that you are not so rushed this 
week that you are indeifferent to 
the needs of others. Balance 
pleasure with the performance of 
duty. (July 8-July 22)- 
Suggestions from others may not 
be quite as good as they seem at 
first. Detail any finds you make or 
you may not be able to claim them. 

LEO (July 23- Aug. 7) -New 
ideas may seem more original and 
more feasible than they really are. 
Make careful tests before investing 
time, effort, and money. (Aug. 8- 
Aug. 22) — Great opportunities may 
come your way over the next six 
days-but you will have to be 
ultradiscerning to discern them in 
the midst of confusing times. 



f Classifieds r 



CLEAN CLOTHES 



FOR SALE 



VIvitar Zoom l^m (or sale 8.S-20Sniin. 
|.\skinK tIKll. (all Randa .S-ZWd or 253-7804. 

US- 16 

Stereo for sale — Sony TC'-I60 cassette- 
reorder; Advocate Dolby noise reduction 
lunit. Model 101. Call S49-3865. p.m. 

8-IS 

Queen sized mattress, brand new 
i( almost), retail price flSO.OO. asking 
||7S.OO. Call 549-0599 after 5 p.m. 

8-IS 

1970 MGB. fine shape, new clutch, tires, 
[wire wheels, AM-FM radio, must sell, 
[moving, 11,500.00 or best offer. 665-2435 
lafter 5:30, Dave. 

8-15 

Small maple desk, 7 drawers, well built 
land in good condition, must be seen. Call 
Brent at 545-0411 days and 549-6994 nites 
I before Sat, 

8-15 



The town of Belchertown needs a 
clean, well run, and reasonably priced 
laundromat. Most people living In 
apartments don't have washers and 
dryers. We need clean clothes too! 
BUSINESSMEN CONSIDER THIS 
OPPORTUNITY. 



BICYCLES 



Need cycling Info? Repairs, rentals, 
sales of all modern bicycles. Peloton, I 
East Pleasant St., Amherst Carriage 
Shops. 

tf8-l5 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



The Marx Brothers 




etXiOANUTcr and MONKEY BUSINESS 



AMHERSTCiw*"' 



AMITY ST. 



253-5426 



Kves..7:.M»; Sal & Sun. Mat., !::«• 
Now: t al\ln 'Thr Sound of Music" 




I dbl. box spring ana maiucss, good 
cond., 140; I studio bed, 130; I rm. size 
wool rug. tlO: RCA 8-track tape 
player. 2 speakers, like new. $50; I 
maple bk. case, t5; 1 Ig. table, 17; I pr. 
mall lamps, tS; wall pictures, 14 a 
Diece. Call 665-3553 after 5:00 p.m. 

8-IS 



SERVICES 



John Morrissey was the first 
prizefighter in history to hold 
public office. And when he 
retired from the ring to serve 
in Congress, his first act was 
to sponsor a law that would 
have made prizefighting illegal 
in the U.S. 



* *vi rHP:(;ATES 

OK SMI ruCOLl.ECE 



urnViu. 

i NORTHAMPTON 



Car repair hassles? Experienced 
mechanic will fix it right. No problem to 
I large or small. Foreign or domestic. Call 
Bob, 253-7241. 

as-is 



Convenience style and cool pleasure 
all summer long. Let us shape and 
maintain your hair through the long 
hot summer with conditioners and 
moisturisers by RK and AMINO PON. 
Your style center, 253-9884, 
Collegetown Unisex, 183 No. Pleasant 
St., Amherst, Mass. 

tfS-IS 

Datsun, Toyota, Volvo repaired at 

I reasonable prices, plenty of experience 

and equipment. Phone Russell Baca, 586- 

11227. 

8-IS 



MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY: '69 122S 
Volvo, (iood condition, green brn. vinyl 
int., 4 radial tires. Best offer. S46-i,5«2 
mornings or dinner time. 

tf8-IS 

I want to buy your sick or ailing car, any 
make, any model, any problem, foreign or 
domestic. Call Bob, 253-7241, for fast Itl. 

1969 Austin America, 4 cyl. automatic, 
front wheel drive, good condition, runs 
well, excellent gas mileage. Call 549-1644. 

8-15 

1962 Olds Rocket 98, all power stuff, 
excellent radio, 5 good tires, new battery, 
clean. Best offer. Call 586-0234. 

8-IS 

ROOMMATE WANTED 



Seeking couple to share two bedroom! 
house in Amherst, $50 each and util., grads| 
preferred. Call Ann 256-0481. 

8-15] 

Female to share apt. with 2 others, dish- 
washer, wall to wall carpet, air cond., t65| 
month, on bus route. Call 665-4246. 

8-151 



ROOM WANTED 



Wanted — single room near Amherst or j 
will consider sharing apartment. Callj 
Steve. 2S3-2SO0. 

8-IS I 

HOUSEMATES WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



Kves. ?:!.'>& 9:00 



A.ssislantship open for graduate 
student with experience in first aid 
education. Revised Red Cross first aid 
inslructorship required. Contact Ms. 
Duston, UMass Health Services, 549- 
2671. Equal opportunity employer. 

H-IS 



Two people wanted to fill 2 bedrooms In 
house across from Flo's Diner. Kitchen, 
musical environment, inexpensive. .SM6- 

H-IK 



PERSONAL 



../^ 



The Biggest Howl ^ 
Ever Unleashed! / 




Would the senorita uho is taking 2 
Span, courses this summer and with 
whom I had coffee at Whitmore on the 
morning that the anesthetized tiger 
was on the front page of the ,\.Y. 
Times please call 665-2904. The 
Bearded Accountant. 

8-15 



RESEARCH 

Send i2 for oiir mailorder catalogue, 
complete Educational Research 
Service incl. Term paper research, 
thesis research, etc. COI.LEtJIATE 
HK.SK.AIK II SYSTEMS. 1800 E. Ferry 
\\e.. BIdK: Suite 205. Campden, NJ 
imiOI. Tel. «0«-»62-6777. :io,ooo 
KFSEARCII PAPERS ON FILE. Hrs: 
iii-ri (M-F), l«-4 <S), ($2.95 per page, 7 
day delivery). 

If 







^£^* 



To Jim — yuu nta> be big and you 
may be bold, but for you, dear Jim, I 
am too old. I cannot lure you deeper in 
— into my life of sex and sin. J. 

H-ISI 



HELP WANTED 

I. ah Technician for chemistry 
position in proKressive lab days. BS in 
chemistry or microbiology required. 
No experience necessary, will train. 
Please contact Annie l.ewallen. Chief 
Medical Technologist, Wing Memorial 
llospiUI. Palmer, Mass. 1-28.1-7651, 
cxt. HI. 

tfH-15 



MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



Mel Brooks' 

T 



'i 



CLQ A QIRQ MOUNTAIN FARMS MAIL ^^^ 

00**-JlyO BO ■lTt■^ HAOiEy MASS .^ ^^^ 



HA\'e seeN thg^ future 

AN[) ITDOeSNT WORK 



SEAN 
CONNERY 



from the people who o*ve you 
"The Jazz Singer" 

Today — 2:00-5:45-8:15 
Twi-Lite Hr. — 5:15-5:45, $1.25 



I Whv would a sweet talking dude 
mess with a six-dme mama? 
Love... 
can you dig it? 



\PGri 



JAMES EARL 
JONES 

DIAHANN 
CARROLL 



\ 



ICLAUDINE 



Today — 2:00-5:30-8:00 
Twi-Lite Hr. — 5-5:30, $1.25 



[PG | «* Harry Caul will go anywhere | 
o bug o private conversation 

"The ^ 



Gene 
Hockmon 



Today — 2:00-5:45-8:15 

Twi Lite Hr. — 5:15-5:45, $1.25 



Today — 2:00-5:30-8:00 
Twi-Lite Hr. — 5 5:30, $1.25 



CALL FOR WEEKEND TIMES 



ADMISSION DURING TWILIGHT HOUR U5 



.v*fcfcVi»i**» 



• •♦#•' 



» * t 4 » 



* • * 4 * 9 % % 



Paqe U 



THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST IS, 1974 



\ 
\ 
\ 



Editorials 




Reviews 



Presidents come and go, but . - . 



By ZAMIR NESTELBAUM 
With all of the calamitous despair and 
rejoicing rended toward the capitol city this 
past week, we have failed to recognize the 
real tooth gnasher in our nation's future. And 
that is the knife wedged into the back of 
John Kenneth Galbraithe's favorite toy, "The 
Economy", piercing the heart of our 
capitalistic system. 

Presidents may come and go, am- 
bassadorships may be bought and sold, 
phones may be bugged and bombs may be 
dropped, but unemployment and runaway 
inflation remain. And here in the Amhsrst 
Area, particularly here at UMass, unem- 
ployment is as severe as anywhere. Hordes 
of young, eager, skilled if not at least semi- 
educated UMies wait in line for applications 
to flip hamburgers or deliver pizzas. These 
lost souls are treading about looking for a 
measley dime to keep the landlord at bay and 



the finance company quiet. Well, we've 
learned of several positions in the offing and 
we would like to nominate some likely sorts 
to fill the slots! 

Food Services Chief - A likely position for 
a strong executive type. Ever since Joel 
Stoneham was axed for mismanagement, 
the search has been on for a strong, no 
nonsense authoritarian to take over. Well 
we've known of someone who has just this 
past week lost his job that he has held for the 
past five and '/» years, in the executive field. 
He is a secretive person by nature and he 
doesn't mind lying. In fact he rather enjoys it. 
And these are important characteristics for 
any position dealing with students. He can 
say, for instance, that during an outbreak of 
botulism or beri beri among the unfortunate 
diners, that the food had nothing to do with 
it, that they probably caught it in some public 
toilet. He can put out directives making 



Polish Night sound appealing. 

One of his policies would be to bug each 
table and tape record the conversations to 
every student to use against them if 
necessary. This is a man who is known for 
his dirty trick, and in no time. Food Services 
would become an institution America would 
be proud of, in all 49 states of the Union. And 
don't forget the plumbing. This man has a 
group of associates that he calls his plumbers 
unit which would do this kind of work free of 
charge. UMass deserves to get Dicked by 
this man, as much as he needs — a job. 

Public Relations Director - New England 
Patriots - This is a position in need of a real 
imaginative sort, and not the kind of dregs 
occupying it in the past. Why its plain as a 
hummingbird in heat that the Patriots have 
been mediocre on even their best day, in 
recent years. And the public knows it. A 
good P.R. man would convince the public 



that the Patriots are Superbowl bound 
despite losing every single game. He-she 
would live in his- her own fantasy world 
and would take us all along of the joy ride to 
never never land. 

Well, we know of a man who's also lost his 
job this past week. His credentials for this 
position are impeccable. For the last five 
years he's been living in his own fantasy 
world trying to convince, and often suc- 
ceeding, the rest of the country of the reality 
of his little mirage. As polished as any young 
Guru, he's taken us on a little boatride thru 
Oz, showing us the innocent visions and the 
beautifulnaivetesof his self induced nirvanas. 
Previous to this he held a similar position in 
Disney Land. One fantasy after another, and 
the Patriots are no exception. And 
Everything Was Gloomy For The Mudsville 
Nine That Day. 



Notes from the undergrad 



Undergrad Underground 



By £. PATRICK MCQUAID 

Today I failed Chemistry. Or, 
perhaps, yesterday; I can't be sure. 
The Academic Warning from the 
office says: "You are a failure. Too 
bad; suggest you change your 
major." Which leaves the matter 
doubtful; it could have been 
yesterday. 

It rained the morning that I 
received the warning. I placed the 
manuscript under my raincoat and 
brought it with me to a small deli 
where huge slabs of imported 
cheese and salami hung over the 
glass counter, dangling from small 
red strings. 

I sat at a small table near the 
window and there opened the 
envelope. I must contrive of a plot 
for my next article. The bacon was 
greasy so I brought it back. The 
cashier told me that if I wanted 
another order I would have to pay 
for it so I said to forget it. 

Quickly scanning the sheet I 
discovered about my ill-fated at- 
tempts in the sciences. Thinking 
back, I recall now that the eggs 
were cold. I distinctly remember 



that. It didn't help matters much 
when I put too much salt on them 
either. 

"Well I was lonely and I needed 
someone," exclaimed a female 
voice. "You've served your purpose 
and I have no further use for you." I 
turned; a young man was sitting 
alone at the table across from me. 
His company had left him with that 
remark, stunning him momentarily. 
He gestured to the waitress that his 
coffee needed refilling. She obliged 
him. 

I returned to my own thoughts. I 
need a story idea. I scanned the 
headlines. Apparently the president 
has resigned, and, oh...Polanski has 
released a new film. I hear it's up to 
his usual par; I'll have to see it 
sometime soon. 

My reading was disturbed by a 
slight annoyance rising from the 
table across the room. I focused my 
attention to a young woman who 
was holding a threatening cream 
pie over a fellow's head. "Don't be 
childish!" came a nearby voice. I 
turned and sighted the speaker and 
missed the actual crime. Never- 



Returning tomorrow 

By STEPHEN COAN 

Throughout the village the cry could be heard he's returning 
tomorrow. Over the last couple of years the young people of the village 
were steadily leaving their homes and those who remained were mostly 
discontent with their way of life. 

The village elders knew that something was wrong but they could 
never put their finger on it and even if they did they didn't have the faintest 
idea how to correct it. 

The young man who was returning home was their only hope and 
they weren't even sure that he would return to help them. 

The young man spoke on how he had travelled to a town in the North 
which was known as U Mass. The people warmly greeted me there and 
made feel as though I was one of their brethren instead of a stranger, he 
said. 

They welcomed me with open arms into their school and their in- 
structors instructed me as though I was one of their own children, and they 
made sure that I understood my lessons. Whenever I had a question they 
were willing to listen and answer it patiently until they knew I had fully 
grasped their knowledge. 

Their young people live together instead of being segregated the way 
we are when we go to school. You may say that this leads to immoral 
behavior, buy by living together they learn to help one another out instead 
of the way we fight among ourselves. 

The eldest of the village elders spoke first, it is our way to be aloof 
strangers but we now realize the pointlessness of it and we will now make 
an effort to listen to what they have to say. 

And then the middle elder spoke, did not you want to remain with 
these p>eople, for the picture you have (sainted of them is rosey and I would 
think that you would have wanted to stay there with them forever? 

The young man then spoke with a clear voice and said, "I would have 
liked to remain with them very much, but my place is here, to help my 
brothers, through the wisdom I gained at U Mass." 

"I would be lying if I didn't say that I would like to visit them again, but 
returning and helping my people is more important even if it takes my 
whole life to do it." 

With this the elder of the village spoke and said,"you have not let us 
down my son, and I know how much it must have hurt you to leave there, 
but you have spoken like a wise man." 

And with this the villagers rejoiced for now hopefully the newly gained 
wisdom of one young man through others would revive them before they 
died out. 

I Stephen is returning to school in Florida. 1 



theless, the man was crowned with 
whipped cream; or perhaps it was 
banana cream, I wasn't sure. 

No sooner had this occured 
when the girl cried: I'm sorry, really 
sorry. Here, hit me with a pie if you 
like!" His eyes glanced down to the 
gravy-stained menu. The price of 
cream pie had risen another dime. 
This was obviously the only 
deterrant that kept him from 
pouncing on her. He rose slowly 
and departed. Needless to say he 
did not finish his tea. 

Damn, I need something to write 
about; but what? What can be said? 
Nothing new; it's just a different 
direction from which the writer 
perceives it. I wished that I had had 
a paper and pen; I would have 
caught the entire moment on 
paper. A good journalist always has 
some on hand; obviously I don't fit 
in that catagory. But no use-it's 
too real. People don't want to read 
about reality; they'd rather you 
make something up thafs un- 
believable. I recall reading about a 
gentleman who, after each dinner 
would throw his false teeth at his 
wife. She was filing for divorce. I 
could never imagine such a plot By 
far, our absurd existences are 
adventure enough. One needn't 
pen them for memory's sake. 

It was a particularly bad day for 
thumbing but I nevertheless 
procured a ride back to the campus. 
As I arrived. Old Chapel bells 
chimed. My head lowered and my 
arm extended out. I focused my 
eyes on my time piece. Early; 
always early. The bells always 
chime too soon. 

And so I'm sitting in the coffee 
shop watching small beads of 
amber liquid bubble up from under 
my cup while trying to find 
something to write about. "I think 
I'll buy a grindstone," comes a 
distraught voice, "and hang it on 
my wall. Each morning i'll rub my 
nose against it; just to make it 
official." 

It's all past now. It's past even 
while I write these words. The 
thoughts leap from my brain to my 
pen and yet they're too late. Even 
before the idea has finished for- 
mulating in my mind, it's gone. 

I let the seconds pass. I watch 
them tick by on the wall clock and 
do not restrain them. I used to drain 
each minute and wring it dry; now I 
let them flow by in anticipation of 
the next one. It's like riding with a 
rear view mirror. Aware of where 
you are, were, and will be, all at 
once. Like opposing infinities 
pulling at you in each direction. I 
remember tomorrow. It isn't that 
far away, and it wasn't too long 
ago. And so what can be said after 
a quarter of a century? What can I 
write about; I need an idea, 



Last issue thoughts 



This is the last issue of the Summer Solstice. 

For the first time in many years, the summer 
newspaper seriously attempted to not only let 
students know what area activities were available, 
but also to keep them informed of campus news. 

The latter is an important role. Too often ad- 
ministrators have taken advantage of the summer to 
pass regulations of questionable benefit to the 
students. A student paper, at least, can be an ac- 
curate check for the students. 

It is imperative, therefore, that a paper be 
published each summer. For a brief while this year, 
there was some doubt whether the Summer Activities 
Council would fund the paper. Students should 
demand that such publication never be questioned, or 
petition the Student Government Association to set 
aside money for the paper. 

Unlike the Collegian, which has no official con- 
nection to the Summer Solstice, we operated with a 
very small staff. Undoubtedly some news wa3 not 
reported which should have been reported and hard- 
pressed for time with a looming deadline, some 
mistakes were made. 

Still, the paper performed in a highly admirable 
fashion we believe. 

Special thanks to: Steve Ruggle, AAark Vogler, Jim 
Paulin, Jackie Blount, John Woods, Sisay Bezu, Cathy 
Thompson, AAark Citron, Jerry Lazar, Alan Chap- 
man, Sherwood Thompson, Ed Cohen, Fred Nobles, 
Ed AAcQuaid, Mike Kostek, Zamir Nestelbaum, the 
Black News Service, Stephen Coan, Luis AAedina, 
Dave Less, David Sokol, and to those in student 
government who cooperated with the Solstice staff. 

Mike Kneeland 



Gypsy Symphony^ six 
cuts recommended 



By TYLA L MICHELOVE 
GYPSY SYMPHONY - WENDY WALDMAN (Warner Bros. BS 2792) 
The cartridge on my turntable needs replacing and still the energy of this 
album comes fighting through. You may have heard your fill of love 
songs- rejection songs, but this album will change your mind. The words 
and music are a perfect reflection of the tumbling emotions all women feel 
and can never seem to express. This album isn't coy like Ms. Muldaur, 
sweet like Ms. Ronstadt or showy in Ms. Midler's way, if s gutsy, honest, 
lustfilled, lovefilled in terms of Toni Brown (Joy of Cooking), Bonnie Raitt 
and Ellen Mclllwain.. With all these comparisons, Wendy Walman 
maintains a sound of her own, something to be admired and enjoyed. She 
takes some Delta Blues, adds a rock 'n roll rhythm, a Billie Holiday vocal 
style (some Joni Mitchell and Bonnie Raitt influences as well) and throws 
in an arranging style (at times) like an old musical movie score (the horns 
are pretty well done). Together it sounds, well . . . together. Her version of 
"Mad Mad Me"put Muldaur's to shame (listen to them back to back, if s 
funny). 

Although Gypsy Symphony isn't going to change your lifestyle or shed 
light on an obscure philosophy, it is a good album musically and lyrically, 
something not to be overlooked. I can recommend six cuts from the 
album: 

"My Name is Love", "My Love is all I Know", "Cold Back on Me" 
(excellent rhythm here), "Northwoods Man", "Mad Mad Me" and "Come 
on Down". For a woman, she does ok. 

B, and let's hope she gets even better.